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East Australia Weather Watch
Brisbane Australia
For those fluent in the language of clouds, especially of weather systems that portend the spectacular release of energy, the Brisbane Storm Chasers, hosting a network of high quality cameras, is your virtual window to weather.

However, for those not intimately acquainted with the geography of Eastern Australia, following the evolution of weather patterns and storm systems can be a bit confusing. It occurred to me that a map plotting the camera locations would be a perceptible aid.

The East Australia Weather Watch (EAWW) is based on the collection of fifty web cameras made available on the Brisbane Storm Chasers website. This excellent web camera resource is plotted on this map to the cameras' geographic locations in East Australia.

In addition to the Brisbane Storm Chasers Cameras, I've included links to Doppler radar locations and live stream audio for Air Traffic Control (LiveATC.net) centers and ground based Emergency Services in the region (RadioReference.com). This makes it possible to watch severe weather on the cameras and Doppler radar while listening to Air Traffic Control weather and pilot reports from nearby airports and aircraft, or Emergency Services responding to storm events on the ground.

My intention in plotting the The Australian Weathercam Network and the live audio feeds, as well as other weather resources, is to provide the camera viewer with a geographic, map based, resource that will enhance the understanding and enjoyment of Australian weather systems.

Included also on the map are links to APRS (Automatic Packet Reporting System); an amateur radio-based system for real time tactical digital communications of information of immediate value in the local area, and ACARS (Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System); a digital datalink system for transmission of short, relatively simple messages between aircraft and ground stations via radio or satellite. APRS provides real time measurements from dozens of amateur weather station operators. Weather stations are indicated on the APRS map by the blue WX icon. APRS is useful in additional interesting ways I leave to the user to explore. For those unfamiliar with ACARS and APRS, there are very good introductory articles on Wikipedia.

The camera and audio data represented on this map is exportable to Google Earth as a KML file.

Finally, the EAWW map, like The Sunrise Project blog is dedicated to the memory of my god-daughter Adrienne Taylor Keil (1989-2007)

Links:
Brisbane Storm Chasers -- http://www.bsch.au.com/index.shtml
LiveATC.net -- http://www.liveatc.net/
RadioReference -- http://www.radioreference.com/

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    East Australia Weather Watch

    For those fluent in the language of clouds, especially of weather systems that portend the spectacular release of energy, the Brisbane Storm Chasers, hosting a network of high quality cameras, is your virtual window to weather. However, for those not intimately acquainted with the geography of Eastern Australia, following the evolution of weather patterns and storm systems can be a bit confusing. It occurred to me that a map plotting the camera locations would be a perceptible aid. The East Australia Weather Watch (EAWW) is based on the collection of fifty web cameras made available on the Brisbane Storm Chasers website. This excellent web camera resource is plotted on this map to the cameras' geographic locations in East Australia. In addition to the Brisbane Storm Chasers Cameras, I've included links to Doppler radar locations and live stream audio for Air Traffic Control (LiveATC.net) centers and ground based Emergency Services in the region (RadioReference.com). This makes it possible to watch severe weather on the cameras and Doppler radar while listening to Air Traffic Control weather and pilot reports from nearby airports and aircraft, or Emergency Services responding to storm events on the ground. My intention in plotting the The Australian Weathercam Network and the live audio feeds, as well as other weather resources, is to provide the camera viewer with a geographic, map based, resource that will enhance the understanding and enjoyment of Australian weather systems. Included also on the map are links to APRS (Automatic Packet Reporting System); an amateur radio-based system for real time tactical digital communications of information of immediate value in the local area, and ACARS (Aircraft Communications Addressing and Reporting System); a digital datalink system for transmission of short, relatively simple messages between aircraft and ground stations via radio or satellite. APRS provides real time measurements from dozens of amateur weather station operators. Weather stations are indicated on the APRS map by the blue WX icon. APRS is useful in additional interesting ways I leave to the user to explore. For those unfamiliar with ACARS and APRS, there are very good introductory articles on Wikipedia. The camera and audio data represented on this map is exportable to Google Earth as a KML file. Finally, the EAWW map, like The Sunrise Project blog is dedicated to the memory of my god-daughter Adrienne Taylor Keil (1989-2007) Links: Brisbane Storm Chasers -- http://www.bsch.au.com/index.shtml LiveATC.net -- http://www.liveatc.net/ RadioReference -- http://www.radioreference.com/