Post Office Murals (1930s)

Labor Art

Reginald Marsh, among others, created murals for the Post Office building, depicting such themes as the internal operations of the Post Office, the Postal Service in isolated areas, postal workers unloading, sorting and transferring mail and the connections the Postal Service facilitates between people around the world. According to xxx, these murals, plus the murals in the Department of Justice building represented significant works of government art, both in quality and quantity; "..... led to the formation of a permanent section of painting and sculpture in the Treasury Department for the decoration of new Federal buildings."
(NOTE: the only murals you can see are on the ground floor on Pennsylvania Avenue in the lobby to the left of the postal station; to see the ones on upper floors -- including the two by Marsh (corridor in the southwest corner of the 4th floor), one of the unloading of mail from an ocean steamer and one of the internal workings of "the great Post Office" -- you must have someone from the EPA get you into the building)

US

DC

Washington

1200 Pennsylvania Ave NW

lobby to left of postal station

Close-up detail from "The Family Letter" by Alexander Brook. photo by Andy Richards

Detail from "The Family Letter" by Alexander Brook. photo by Andy Richards

DC Labor Map

Welcome to the DC Labor Map! Here you can find both current and historic labor sites in Washington, DC, including union hotels, restaurants, international and local union organizations, labor art and historic labor sites. You can use it for an online virtual tour of DC labor, or to plan your visit to our nation’s capital.
CLICK ON "LEGEND" at right to view categories; TO CHOOSE A SPECIFIC CATEGORY just click on it and only those sites will be shown.
We welcome your comments and suggestions: click on the “comments” tab at the bottom of the map. The DC Labor Map is a project of the Metropolitan Washington Council, AFL-CIO: primary research was done by Chris Garlock, Jon Garlock and Lisa Garlock; contributors include: Saul Schniderman, Peter Winch and Fhar Miess.