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Blything Walks
Blything Hundred is an ancient sub-division of Suffolk occupying precisely seven veins of the River Blyth that have carved a broad arc into the deep glacial plateau clays of High Suffolk. This plateau is at its highest (about 55 metres) and flattest along a part of the western watershed, which separates the parishes of Ubbeston (Blything Hundred) and Laxfield (Hoxne Hundred). As inhabitants of the Hundred, families have an historical continuity with the Saxon people, or tribe, that had its capital here at Blythburgh. In this connection, 'Blything' is equated with 'people of the Blyth', a designation that may go further back to a coastal sub-division of land held by the Iron Age Iceni. Blythburgh is the site of a gathering place and first came to prominence as the religious centre of a branch of the Wuffinga kingship centred on Sutton Hoo. This royal connection is evident from the Christian burial at Blythburgh of King Ana in 654. It is recorded as having a market in 1086 and had a functional significance equal to the other Domesday economic centres of Suffolk, which were at Kelsale, Dunwich, Ipswich, Stowmarket, Eye, Hoxne, Bungay, and Beccles.

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    Blything Walks

    Blything Hundred is an ancient sub-division of Suffolk occupying precisely seven veins of the River Blyth that have carved a broad arc into the deep glacial plateau clays of High Suffolk. This plateau is at its highest (about 55 metres) and flattest along a part of the western watershed, which separates the parishes of Ubbeston (Blything Hundred) and Laxfield (Hoxne Hundred). As inhabitants of the Hundred, families have an historical continuity with the Saxon people, or tribe, that had its capital here at Blythburgh. In this connection, 'Blything' is equated with 'people of the Blyth', a designation that may go further back to a coastal sub-division of land held by the Iron Age Iceni. Blythburgh is the site of a gathering place and first came to prominence as the religious centre of a branch of the Wuffinga kingship centred on Sutton Hoo. This royal connection is evident from the Christian burial at Blythburgh of King Ana in 654. It is recorded as having a market in 1086 and had a functional significance equal to the other Domesday economic centres of Suffolk, which were at Kelsale, Dunwich, Ipswich, Stowmarket, Eye, Hoxne, Bungay, and Beccles.