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Maritime NY Cultural Resources

Going Coastal, Inc. has designed this community-based mapping project as an ongoing collaborative venture that invites users to search and contribute to the historical database. Please share your maritime places, sites, structures, and photographs.
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Fort Wadsworth Lighthouse
Gateway National Recreation Area
210 New York Avenue
Staten Island
718-354-4500
Grounds are open to the public and
Rangers offer occasional tours of the light.

Location: On the walls of Battery Weed over the Narrows.

Built: 1903
Owner: National Park Service

Description: The square brick tower with white cast iron lantern had a light that was visible at sea for 14 miles and helped guide ships through the Narrows until 1965, when it was rendered obsolete by the Verrazano Bridge. It was restored by volunteer Joe Esposito with a solar-powered beacon.
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Fort Schuyler
SUNY Maritime College
6 Pennyfield Avenue
Bronx , 10465
718-409-7218
Open to the public.

Built: 1826-1845
Owner: SUNY Maritime College
Designation: National Register of Historic Places

Description: The granite fort built to protect the East River approach to New York Harbor has an irregular pentagon shape, based on French forts. During the Spanish-American War mines were planted in the water between the fort and its counterpoint, Fort Totten. Decommissioned in 1934, the fort is restored on the grounds of SUNY Maritime College and is home to the Maritime Industry Museum.
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Castle William
Governors Island National Monument
Manhattan
212-514-8271
Seasonal public tours. Free ferry from the Battery Maritime Building.

Built: 1807-1811
Owner: National Park Service
Designation: National Register of Historic Places

Description: The sister fort of Castle Clinton sits on a rocky promontory looking out on the harbor channel. The first casement fort built in North America, Castle William is named for its designer, Lt. Colonel Jonathan Williams, the first superintendent of West Point. It looks like a medieval castle with its 40-foot high, 8-foot thick sandstone walls, still guarded by some of the original canons. Twenty-seven French 35-pound cannons lined the lower tier, and thirty-nine 20-pounders lined the second tier. Castle Williams served as a prison camp for confederate soldiers during the Civil War and, decades later, as jail to U.S. World War II recruits Walt Disney and boxer Rocky Graziano.


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Fort Jay
Governors Island National Monument
Manhattan
Open seasonally. Ferry departs Battery Maritime Building.

Built: first established 1798
Owner: National Park Service
Designation:

Description: The Fort is located on the highest point of the island. It is surrounded by earthen covered walls and a star-shaped dry moat. Originally named for statesman John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, the Fort was rebuilt as Fort Columbus in 1803, and restored to Fort Jay in 1904. Three Rodman cannons with one-mile ranges are still in place from the Civil War. Fort Jay served as the First U.S. Army’s (first on beaches of Normandy) headquarters after WWII to 1966.

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Fort Totten Battery
Fort Totten Park
212th St and Bell Blvd
Bayside, Queens
718-352-4793
Open to the public.

Built: 1858
Owner: NYC Parks & Recreation
Designation: Landmark ACOE Officer's Club

Description: The granite battery was originally called the Fort at Willet’s Point. Arched openings, circular staircases, tunnels and magazine openings were constructed during the Civil War but never completed. Totten sits on a promontory extending into Little Neck Bay guarding the “back door” to New York Harbor with Fort Schuyler.

The Nike missile defense system was developed here. The 136-acre historic Army base served as a school for the Army Corps of Engineers and a staging facility for various commands until the Gulf War. The landmark 1870 Officer’s Club building is the insignia of Army Corp of Engineers.
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Ambrose Light Tower
Ambrose Channel
New York Harbor
Active aid to navigation

Location: Ambrose Light marks Ambrose Channel, the chief entry to the ports of New York Harbor.

Built: 1967

Description: From 1908 and 1967, three lightships served the Ambrose Channel; one is a floating exhibit at South Street Seaport Museum. The lightship was replaced by a Texas-style tower, which was later damaged in a collision with an oil tanker. since 1999, a solar-powered tower featuring fog signal, radio and radar beacons and weather station has marked the harbor entrance.
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Castle Clinton National Monument
Battery Park
Manhattan
212-344-7220
Open to the public.

Built: 1808
Owner: National Park Service
Designation: National Monument

Description: The red sandstone circular fort originally called the Southwest Battery was built on rocks located 200 feet off the southern tip of Manhattan to defend the city in the War of 1812. The fort never had occasion to fire on the enemy and was later renamed for Mayor DeWitt Clinton. Substantial landfilling joined the structure the Battery. Throughout the years, the site has been a restaurant, the opera house Castle Garden, an immigration depot, and the first home of the New York Aquarium.
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Jeffrey's Hook "Little Red" Lighthouse
Fort Washington Park
West 181st Street
Manhattan
Urban Rangers conduct periodic tours and host an annual festival.

Location: On an outcropping of rocks called Jeffrey’s Hook just under the George Washington Bridge.

Built: 1889
Owner: NYC Parks & Recreation

Description: America's most beloved lighthouse. Deactivated in 1947, the small cast iron sentinel was slated for demolition. It was rescued by a children’s book, “The Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Grey Bridge” by Hildegarde H. Swift, which is about being small in a big world, which inspired community action and preservation. The light was re-lit in 2002.

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Blackwell's Light
Lighthouse Park
Roosevelt Island
Location: An esplanade on the island’s west side leads to the lighthouse, which is still lit at night.

Built: 1872
Architect: James Renwick Jr.

Description: The octagon-shaped Gothic-style tower stands 50 feet tall at the northern tip of Roosevelt Island (originally called Welfare Island) stands sentinel at the Hell Gate. This is one of the few lights not built by the federal government, but erected by the City of New York. It was constructed by convict labor using locally quarried granite. It takes its name from the Blackwell family that owned the island from 1685 to 1823 and served as a private navigational aid for over 70 years.

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Coney Island Light Station
Beach 46th Street
Sea Gate
Brooklyn
Active aid to navigation.

Location: Covers the Main Channel from Norton's Point in Sea Gate on the western edge of Coney island.

Built: 1890
Owner: The Coast Guard has leased the light to the Seagate Association, and there are plans to offer public tours.

Description: The skeletal light covering the Main Channel stands 75 feet tall and its red flashing beacon can be seen for 14 miles was established in 1890 on a spit of land in what is today the gated community of Sea Gate. The keeper’s cottage was home to the last civilian keeper, Frank Schubert, who joined the Lighthouse Service in 1937 and administered Coney Island light from 1960 to when he passed in 2003.

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Elm Tree
Miller Field - Gateway National Recreation Area
New Dorp Lane
Staten Island
Only the concrete tower remains today.

Location: Miller Field in Gateway National Recreation Area.

Built: 1856
Owner: National Park Service

Description: Named for a large Elm Tree located here that was used for navigation. It was replaced by a concrete aviation tower in 1939, which had a green light for aviators and white light for mariners. The light was replaced by a channel marker in 1964, and the site became part of Gateway National Recreation Area in 1972.

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New Dorp Lighthouse
Boyle Street
Staten Island
Location: The lighthouse, built on Vanderbilt farmland, has been privately owned since 1974.

Built: 1856
Designation: National Register of Historic Places

Description: An inland light centered on top of the keeper’s dwelling, 40 feet high and 192 feet above sea level, active from 1856 to 1964. It served as a rear range light for the Swash Channel in concert with Elm Tree Light.

There is no longer a beacon, but the appearance is maintained in its original form.
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Throgs Neck Light
SUNY Maritime College
Hanus Street
Bronx
Active aid to navigation.

Location: On the campus of SUNY Maritime College.

Established: 1827; current tower 1934
Owner: SUNY

Description: A skeletal tower topped by an automated fixed red light with a range of 11 miles marking the port entry from the Long Island Sound to the East River. Originally built in 1827, the first keepers Samuel Young and Jeth Bayles operated a bar for boaters and anglers at the site. The current tower, established in 1934, remains active today and the keeper's dwelling is used for faculty housing.
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North Brother Island Light
View from Randalls Island
Location: South side of North Brother Island.

Built: 1869
Owner: NYC Parks & Recreation
Current Use: Harbor Heron sanctuary

Description: The light served as a guide across the Hell Gate on the Bay of Brothers beginning in 1869 until 1953, when it was replaced by a skeletal tower. The tower has since been razed. North Brother Island, now a wading bird rookery, was once the forced home to Typhoid Mary at Riverside Hospital. Brother Island was the site of the greatest maritime disaster in New York City history, when on June 15, 1904 the excursion boat General Slocum was consumed by fire and lost 1000 lives on its shore.

The fog bell once used at the station is displayed at the NYPD's Harbor Unit at College Point where it memorializes officers who lost their lives in the line of duty.
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Old Orchard Shoals
Active aid to navigation.

Location: Three miles off Staten Island's south shore in Raritan Bay

Built: 1893
Owner: US Coast Guard

Description: The flashing white beacon marks the hazardous shoals at the narrow Gedney Channel. The brown and white tower established in 1893 stands 50.5 feet tall and sits on a caisson foundation. It is a spark plug or “bug light,” which is a prefab cast-iron cylinder about 20-feet across that was assembled on-site.
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Robbins Reef Lighthouse
Upper New York Bay
Active aid to navigation.

Location: The lighthouse sits on a small islet near the entrance to the Kill van Kull, best viewed from the Staten Island Ferry.

Established: 1883; current tower 1933
Owner: US Coast Guard

Description: Before the light was constructed, this hidden ledge of rocks had caused many wrecks. A 45-foot high spark plug lighthouse also called "Kate's Light" after Katherine Walker,the 4'10" tall widow of the keeper who died of pneumonia in 1886. Kate took over as keeper of Robbins Reef for 33 years retiring in 1819 after minding the kerosene lamp, watching for ships in distress and rearing two children, rowing them to Staten Island every day to attend school.

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Romer Shoal Lighthouse
Active aid to navigation.

Location: Sits just on the New Jersey side of the water boundary with New York.

Built: 1898
Owner: US Coast Guard

Description: A red band marks the 54-foot tall spark plug lighthouse showing a white flashing light. The lighthouse was originally located at the Lighthouse Service Depot, where it was used to test new oils and lenses. An effort to return the structure to the Lighthouse Museum, which now occupies the old depot, is held up with delays in opening the museum.
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Sandy Hook Lighthouse
Gateway National Recreation Area
84 Mercer Rd.
Sandy Hook, New Jersey
Location: Southerly entrance to New York Harbor.

Built: 1764
Owner: National Park Service
Designation: National Landmark

The oldest operating lighthouse in the country, first lighted in 1764. The octagonal tower is built of rubblestone. The lighthouse was transferred to the National Park Service in 1996 and is part of Gateway National Recreation Area at Fort Hancock.
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Statue of Liberty
Liberty Island
New York Harbor
Open daily except December 25. Accessible by ferry from the Battery.

Location: Upper New York Bay

Built: 1886
Sculptor: Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi
Owner: National Park Service
Designation: National Monument (1924)

Description: The lighted torch in Lady Liberty’s right hand was an aid to navigation from 1886 to 1902, Liberty Enlightening the World, an on site electric plant generated power to the electric torch, which was visible for 24 miles at sea.

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Staten Island Range
Edinboro Road
Staten Island
Active aid to navigation.

Built: 1912
Owner: US Coast Guard

Description: The 90-foot tower is located on a hilltop 141 feet above sea level in a residential neighborhood. The beacon is visible for a range of 18 miles at sea. The rear channel light works in tandem with the West Bank Lighthouse. The structure has an octagonal tower and was one of the last brick lighthouses built. Joe Esposito, a local lighthouse enthusiast, acted as volunteer keeper of the then automated light from 1992 to 2003. The NYC landmarked light remains active. The keeper’s house is now a private residence. Esposito's built a four foot model of the lighthouse and donated it to the National Lighthouse Museum.
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Stepping Stones
At the confluence of the East River & Long Island Sound
View from Beldon’s Point, City Island
Active aid to navigation.

Location: Western end of Long Island Sound, built atop a riprap foundation east of the Throgs Neck Bridge.

Built: 1878
Owner: USCG

The red brick Second Empire style lighthouse's green flashing light warns mariners of the mussel encrusted reefs to the south. The keeper’s house is no longer in use and the USCG has offered the property to bid.
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Titanic Memorial Lighthouse & Time Ball
South Street Seaport Museum
Pearl at Fulton Street
Manhattan
Location: Marks the entrance to the Seaport Historic District since 1976.

Built: 1915
Owner: South Street Seaport Museum

Description: The light is a tribute to those lost in the SS Titanic disaster on April 15, 1912. The 60-foot tall light was originally located on top of the old Seaman’s Church Institute at South Street and Coenties Slip. A time ball attached to its pole would drop at noon each day, alerting ships in the port to set their watches.

The plaque reads:
TITANIC MEMORIAL LIGHTHOUSE

THIS LIGHTHOUSE IS A MEMORIAL TO THE PASSENGERS, OFFICERS AND CREW WHO DIED AS HEROES WHEN THE STEAMSHIP TITANIC SANK AFTER COLLISION WITH AN ICEBERG

LATITUDE 41° 46' NORTH
LONGITUDE 50° 14' WEST
APRIL 15, 1912

THE LIGHTHOUSE WAS ORIGINALLY ERECTED BY PUBLIC SUBSCRIPTION IN 1913. IT STOOD ABOVE THE EAST RIVER ON THE ROOF OF THE OLD SEAMEN'S CHURCH INSTITUTE AT THE CORNER OF SOUTH STREET AND COENTIES SLIP. FROM 1913 TO 1967 THE TIME BALL AT THE TOP OF THE LIGHTHOUSE WOULD DROP DOWN THE POLE TO SIGNAL TWELVE NOON TO THE SHIPS IN THE HARBOR. THIS TIME BALL MECHANISM WAS ACTIVATED BY A TELEGRAPHIC SIGNAL FROM THE NATIONAL OBSERVATORY IN WASHINGTON, D.C.

IN JULY 1968 THE SEAMEN'S CHURCH INSTITUTE MOVED TO ITS PRESENT QUARTERS AT 15 STATE STREET. THAT YEAR THE TITANIC MEMORIAL LIGHTHOUSE WAS DONATED BY THE KAISER-NELSON STEEL & SALVAGE CORPORATION TO THE SOUTH STREET SEAPORT MUSEUM. IT WAS ERECTED ON THIS CORNER AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE MUSEUM COMPLEX IN MAY 1976 WITH FUNDS PROVIDED BY THE EXXON CORPORATION.

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West Bank Lighthouse
Lower New York Bay
View from Coney Island or South Beach
Active aid to navigation.

Location: Five miles south of the Verrazano Bridge.

Built: 1901
Owner: US Coast Guard

Description: A brown conical tower at the juncture of the Ambrose Channel. It is the tallest of the offshore lights at 70 feet and shows a fixed white light. The beacon was converted to solar power in 1998.
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Prince's Bay Lighthouse
Mount Loretto Unique Area
Hylan Blvd.
Staten Island
718-482-4953
Location: Bluffs of Mount Loretto overlooking Princes Bay.

Built: 1828
Owner: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

Description: A brownstone keeper’s house and attached tower built on the high bluffs in 1828, serving the oystermen of Prince’s Bay to 1922. For many years, Mt. Lorretto orphanage owned the property and a statue of the Virgin Mary stood in the tower, in place of a light. Since 1999, the land is now a natural preserve.
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Fort Gibson
Ellis Island National Monument
Manhattan
212-363-3200
Open daily except December 25th. Ferries depart frequently from the Battery.

Built: 1813

Description: Excavations on the south east part of the island show some of the footings and walls that once held three tiers of circular guns. Fort Gibson was a horse-shoe shaped battery built as a coastal defense. After 1861 the site served as a powder magazine for the Union Army during the Civil War. Oyster Island, located one mile from the Battery, was renamed Ellis in 1890 and chosen as the site for the main immigrant processing station, which it served 1892 to 1954. The island was enlarged tenfold by successive landfills from its original 2.74 acres to 27.5 acres.

Remnants of the fort were instrumental in determining a 160 year old sovereignty and jurisdiction dispute between New York and New Jersey over the federally owned island which the US Supreme Court ruled on in 1996 granting New York granted jurisdiction to only 4.68 acres.

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Fort Wood
Statue of Liberty National Monument
Liberty (Bedloe) Island
Manhattan
Open daily except December 25th. Ferries depart frequently from the Battery.

Built: 1808-1811
Owner: National Park Service

Description: Originally known as Star Fort because of its 11 point star-shaped battery, the Fort was named for Eleazor Wood, a hero of the War of 1812. In 1861 it was an infirmary for sick Confederate prisoners of war. Some of the old ramparts can be seen near the entrance to the Statue of Liberty, which is through the Fort’s 20-foot thick walls and sally port door. Inside, a stairway leads to a promenade that was a gun platform along the wall of the fort.

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Fort Hamilton
230 Sheridan Loop
Harbor Defense Museum
Brooklyn
718-630-4349
The oldest part of the Fort houses a museum free to visitors; open Monday to Friday 10:00 am – 4:00 pm, Saturday 10:00 am – 2:00 pm.

Built: 1825-1831
Owner: US Army

Description: Fort Hamilton is one of the oldest Army garrisons in the country and the oldest granite fort in the harbor. A small Battery was first used here on July 4, 1776, when General Knox fired on the HMS Asia as it approached the Narrows. Capt. Robert E. Lee, “Stonewall” Jackson and Capt. Abner Doubleday served at Fort Hamilton. It remains an active Army post with Army Recruiting Battalion, Reserve and National Guard units active today.

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Fort Lafayette
Brooklyn
The fort is under the eastern foot of the Verrazano Bridge.

Built: 1812

Description: The Naval Magazine stood off the coast of Fort Hamilton on Hendricks Reef. It was razed in 1960 to construct the Verrazano Bridge.
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Fort Tilden
Gateway National Recreation Area
Rockaway Peninsula
Queens
Open to the public. Hiking trails pass the buried remains of gun platforms and abandoned batteries are used for observing raptors and other birds.

Built: 1917
Owner: National Park Service
Jamaica Bay Unit, Gateway National Recreation Area

Description: Military post and naval air station on 317 acres named for former Governor Samuel J. Tilden. Battery Harris worked together with a battery six miles across the harbor at Fort Hancock in New Jersey. A Nike missile site for much of the cold war, Fort Tilden was active to 1974.


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Fort Tryon
Fort Tryon Park
Cabrini Blvd.
Manhattan
Open to the public. Only a plaque and flagpole commemorate the site.

Built: 1776
Owner: NYC Parks & Recreation

Description: Part of the Fort Washington series of posts built on high ground overlooking the Hudson River, it was the last stronghold of British forces on Manhattan Island. In the decisive battle, Margaret Corbin took up her fallen husband’s post and became the first American woman wounded on the battlefield. In 1779, “Capt. Molly,” was compensated by Congress for her distinguished bravery. The park was named for the last British governor of colonial New York.
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Fort Wadsworth
Gateway National Recreation Area
210 New York Avenue
Staten Island
718-354-4500
Open to the public.

Built: Fort Tompkins - 1807, Battery Weed (aka Fort Richmond) - 1860, Fort Wadsworth - 1900
Owner: National Park Service
Designation: National Historic Landmark, Battery Weed - NYC Landmark

Description: A complex of forts and batteries including Battery Weed and Fort Tomkins, incorporated into Fort Wadsworth. Battery Weed was the oldest continuously manned military installation in the country and one of the most dominent, first fortified by the Dutch in 1636, active during the Revolutionary War, enlarged for the War of 1812 and up until the Navy left in 1994.
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Miller Field
Gateway National Recreation Area
New Dorp Lane
Staten Island
718-351-6970
Now a sport's field open to the public.

Built: 1919
Owner: National Park Service

Description: An Air Service Coast Defense Station, coast artillery gun site and NIKE missile repair depot, each occupied the 213 acre airfield built on William H. Vanderbilts farm fields. It also served as a base for Army Special Forces.
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Kingsborough Community College
City University of New York
Brooklyn
718-368-5000
Location: Atop the round Marine Academic Center at the entrance to Sheepshead Bay and Rockaway Inlet.

Built: 1990
Owner: CUNY

Description: A skeletal tower that rises 114 feet above sea level and has a range of 11 miles and flashes a white light every four seconds.
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Firefighter
FDNY Marine Co. 9
St. George Terminal, Slip 7
Staten Island
Active duty.

Built: 1938 United Shipyards, NY
Length: 134, Beam 32, Draft-9 Hull: STEEL
Designation: National Historic Landmark

Description: Fire Fighter cost $983,000, can do 15 knots and has water guns with output of 20,000 gallons per minute. Designed by William F. Gibbs, she was New York’s first diesel electric boat and received the “Gallant Ship Award” for rescuing 30 seamen from fire aboard the Esso Brussels and Sea Witch collision in the harbor in 1972.


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U.S.S. Intrepid
Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum
North River, Pier 86
Manhattan
212-245-0072
Current use: Dockside museum. Dry docked for restoration 2006 to Fall 2008

Built: 1943 Newport News Shipbldg., VA
Length: 856, Beam: 93, Draft: 30/54.6
Displacement: 33292 Hull: STEEL
Original Use: Combatant
Designation: National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Landmark.

Description: One of 24 Essex Class carriers, Intrepid weighs 42,000 tons and is as tall as a 16-story building. She could reach speeds of 30 knots. Intrepid has had an active career beginning in WWII, where she joined the fleet at Leyte Gulf, the largest naval engagement in history. She has survived kamikaze hits, seven bomb attacks and a torpedo strike. She served in Korea and Vietnam, and was the prime recovery vessel for NASA, finally retiring in 1974. Host to Fleet Week activities each May.
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Growler
Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum
Pier 86, North River
Manhattan
212-245-0072
Current use: Floating exhibit. The museum complex is closed until Fall 2008.

Built: 1958 Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, NH
Length: 317.7, Beam: 27.2, Draft: 19, Displacement: 2768. Hull: STEEL
Original Use: Combatant

Description: The only guided missile submarine open to the public, Growler was one of three subs designed to carry Regulus cruise missiles. She was dispatched on nuclear deterrent patrol from 1958 to 1964. The vessel was saved from becoming a torpedo target by the Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum in 1988.
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Lightship Frying Pan LV-115
Hudson River Park
Pier 66, W 26th Street
Manhattan
212-989-6363
Current Use: Attraction/Event Space

Built: 1929 Charleston Drydock, SC
Length: 133.3, Beam: 30, Draft: 13.8
Gross tonnage: 630, Hull: STEEL
Original Use: Aid to Navigation
Designation: National Register of Historic Places

Description: One of only 13 lightships surviving from more than 100 Established. Served from 1930 to 1965 as the floating lighthouse at Frying Pan Shoals, located at the entrance to Cape Fear River in North Carolina. Employed as an examination vessel and net tender during WWII, retired in 1965, and recovered from the bottom of Chesapeake Bay in 1989.

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John J. Harvey
Hudson River Park
North River W 26th Street
Manhattan
Current use: Currently being overhauled at Derecktor Shipyard in Bridgeport, CT.

Built: 1931 Todd Shipyards, Brooklyn
Length: 130, Beam: 28, Draft: 9.0
Gross tons: 268 Hull: STEEL
Original Use: FDNY Fireboat
Designation:. National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Landmark

Description: The fastest large fireboat in the world, clocking over 17 knots, and once the most powerful with eight water canons that can pump 18,000 GPM. Named for a downed fireboat captain, the Harvey was the longest serving FDNY fireboat when it retired in 1995. Purchased at auction in 1999 and today shares its classic water display at harbors events. She answered the call for the Normandie fire in 1942 and aided in World Trade Center relief efforts on 9/11. The vessel received a New York State Preservation matching grant in the amount of $320,000, which must be matched by 2009.
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Lehigh Valley RR Barge No. 79
Waterfront Museum & Showboat Barge
Pier 44, 290 Conover St.
Red Hook , Brooklyn
718-624-4719
Current Use: Museum/Performance Space

Built: 1914 Perth Amboy Dry Dock Co.
Length: 86, Beam: 30, Draft: 2 Tons: 454 Displacement: 150. Hull: WOOD
Original Use: Cargo
Designation: National Register of Historic Places

Description: The only surviving wooden-covered railroad barge of the Lighterage Era (1860-1960) afloat today. It once carried up to 450 tons of cargo between rail lines and waterfront. Rescued and restored in 1986 by museum founder and professional clown David Sharps. Now offering educational programs and live performances at the Red Hook Garden Pier.
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Lightship Ambrose LV-87
South Street Seaport Museum
Pier 16, East River, Manhattan
(212) 330-8086
Current Use: Floating Exhibit

Built: 1907 NY Shipbuilding Co. Camden, NJ
Length: 135.9, Beam: 29, Depth of Hold: 13 Gross/Net Tons: 683/488. Hull: STEEL
Original Use: Aid to Navigation
Designation: National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Landmark.

Description: Served at the Ambrose station marking the entrance to New York Harbor–8 miles east of Rockaway Point, from 1907 until 1932. In 1922, the first radio beacon in the U.S. was installed on the ship. She served various stations, finally as the Scotland near Sandy Hook until decommissioned in 1962.
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Wavetree
South Street Seaport Museum
Pier 16, East River
Manhattan
212-748-8786
Current use: Floating exhibit.

Built: 1885 Southampton, UK
Length: 279, Breadth: 40.2, Depth: 24.4
Gross Tonnage: 2170 Hull: IRON
Original Use: Cargo
Designation: National Register of Historic Places

Description: The full rigged ship is the largest sailing ship afloat, and one of the last built of wrought iron. A tramp ship, Wavetree took on cargo for hire from India to South America. Sold in 1910, she was used as a warehouse in Chile and later converted to a sand barge before being acquired by the Seaport Museum in 1968.
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W. O. Decker Tugboat
South Street Seaport
Pier 16, East River
Manhattan
212-748-8786
Current Use: Museum/Excursion Boat

Built: 1930 Russell Yard, Long Island City
Length: 52, Breadth: 15, Depth: 5.6
Draft: 6, Gross Tonnage: 27, Hull: WOOD
Original Use: Newtown Creek Towing Co.
Designation: National Register of Historic Places

Description: One of the last steam-powered docking tugs Established in the harbor, now re-powered with diesel. The museum operates tours of the working waterfront on board the little tug.
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Lettie G. Howard
South Street Seaport Museum
Pier 16, East River, Manhattan
Current Use: Museum/Seafaring Camp

Built: 1893 Arthur D. Story Essex, MA
Length: 74.6, Beam: 21, Depth of Hold: 8.4 Gross Tons: 59, Displacement: 102
Hull: WOOD
Original Use: Fishing boat
Designation: National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Landmark.

Description: The schooner worked the fishing and oystering trades out of Gloucester, the Yucatan Peninsula and Gulf of Mexico until the 1960s
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Steamship Lilac
Hudson River Park
Pier 40, North River
Manhattan
Current Use: Under restoration

Built: 1933
Original Use: Lighthouse Tender
Designation:

Description: Lilac is powered by two-triple expansion steam engines and was originally Established for the U.S. Lighthouse Service and was later employed as a training vessel for merchant marines, finally decommissioned in 1973.
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Marion M
South Street Seaport
Pier 16, East River
Manhattan
212-748-8725
Current Use: Floating exhibit/work boat

Built: 1932 Virginia
Length: 60.6, Breadth: 22.5, Depth of Hold: 5.4, Gross Tonnage: 41 Hull: WOOD
Original Use: Chandlery lighter; freight

Description: The last wooden chandlery lighter in the country, Marion M has served as an oyster shell hauler and motor freighterfor the Standard Boat Company on Staten Island, and finally as a support vessel to the historic ships in the museum’s floating collection.
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Peking
South Street Seaport Museum
Pier 17, East River, Manhattan
(212) 330-8086
Current Use: Floating Exhibit

Built: 1911 Blohn & Voss Hamburg, Gery.
Rig: four-masted barque
Length: 321, Beam: 47, Depth of Hold: 26.2, Gross/Net Tons: 3080/2850. Hull: STEEL.Original Use: Cargo

Description: A four-masted barque built for commercial use to carry freight on long distance sailing voyages. She later served as a training vessel in England.
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Pioneer
South Street Seaport Museum
Pier 17, East River
Manhattan
Current Use: Excursion Boat

Built: 1885 Pioneer Ironworks, PA
Length: 57, Beam: 21, Draft: 9/4.6,
Gross/Net Tons: 43/37. Hull: STEEL
Original Use: Cargo

Description: The only iron-hulled American sailing schooner still in existence, she was the delivery vehicle of her day. Originally used to carry sand mined near the mouth of the Delaware, she was re-rigged as a schooner in 1895.
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Tug Helen McAllister
South Street Seaport
Pier 16, East River
Manhattan
Current Use: Under restoration

Built: 1900 Burlee Dry Dock, Port Richmond
Length: 112.12, Breadth: 29, Depth: 15.4 Gross Tonnage: 488, Hull: STEEL
Original Use: Towing coal barges

Description: Originally launched as Admiral Dewey, acquired by McAllister Towing in 1980s she worked the Carolina Coast and was donated to museum in 2000.
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Tug Pegasus

212-406-2225
Current use: Education

Built: 1907 Skinner Baltimore, MD
Length: 103, Breadth 24, Depth: 12
Gross tonnage: 186 Hull: STEEL
Original Use: Oil tug
Designation: National REgister of Historic Places

Description: One of only four “Battleship Tugs”—named for their size and 650 horsepower steam engines, it was converted to diesel in 1954. She worked in New York Harbor for 90 years, for Standard Oil Co. out of Bayonne, as part of the McAllister fleet for 35 years, and in 1987 was acquired by Hepburn Marine. Retired in 1997, she is preserved and offers public programs to introduce port life.

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Ventura
Battery Park City
North Cove Marina
Manhattan
212-786-1204
Current Use: Excursion/Charter

Built: 1922 Herreshoff Co., RI
Length: 62.5, Beam: 14.3, Draft 5
Gross/Net Tons: 26/21. Hull: WOOD
Original Use: Private Yacht
Designation: National Historic Landmark.

Description: Wooden sailing ship with a hull made of solid mahogany and decks of Indian teak originally launched as a duck hunting yacht by the founder of Citibank.
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Noble Houseboat Studio
Noble Maritime Collection
1000 Richmond Terrace, Building D
Snug Harbor, Staten Island
718-447-6490
Current use: Museum exhibit

Built: 1941
Original Use: Floating Artist Studio

Description: The studio was built of salvaged parts from scrapped vessels by noted maritime artist John Noble, including a 100-year-old teakwood salon from an abandoned yacht. The furnished artist’s studio was dismantled and reassembled at the museum, where it is on permanent display.
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Tug NY Central No. 13

646-932-1907
Current use: Undergoing restoration at Garpo Marina in Tottenville, Staten Island.

Built: 1887 Dialogue Shipbuilding Camden, NJ
Length: 82, Gross tons: 119
Original Use: Railroad tug

Description: One of few surviving iron hulled tugs, the vessel pushed barges carrying boxcars across the harbor for the NY Central Railroad and was later named the Hay-De by the Kosnac Floating Derrick Corp and was featured in movie “Billy Bathgate.” The vessel was rescued by its current owners in 2002 from being sunk as an artificial reef.
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Tug Bertha

917-701-7548
Current use: Undergoing a complete rebuilt at Garpo Yards in Tottenville, Staten Island.

Built: 1925 Whitworth & Co. Newcastle, UK
Length: 80 Beam: 18 Depth of Hold: 5.6 Displacement: 79 gross tons. Hull: STEEL
Original Use: Timber tug

Description: A Canadian timber tug crafted with a flat bottom and winches so it could move over land between creeks. Rescued by the current owner in 1999.
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South Street Seaport Museum
12 Fulton Street
Manhattan
212-748-8600
Hours: Friday-Sunday 10:00 am -5:00 pm All Galleries are open. Monday 10am-5pm: Schermerhorn Row Galleries Only. Ships open at noon, weather permitting. $8 adults.

An 11-square-block historic district of 19th century buildings and a fleet of century old vessels at the “Street of Ships” on Pier 16 charts the city’s maritime history and lore. The landmark Schermerhorn Row (12 Fulton St.) counting houses, Established on landfill in 1812 by ship owner Peter Schermerhorn, are the architectural centerpiece of the seaport. The upper floors of the block-long “Row” and the adjoining A.A. Low Building encompass 24 galleries that house the museum’s permanent exhibit chronicling the seaports history dating back to the Dutch colonial era. The floors above 92-93 South St. were formerly occupied by the Fulton Ferry Hotel, which inspired writer Joseph Mitchell in Up in the Old Hotel. The Melville, Walter Lord and Port Life galleries are on Water Street.
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City Island Nautical Museum
190 Fordham St
Bronx
718-885-0008
Hours: Sunday 1:00 pm - 5 pm and by appointment. Free admission.

A small island with a rich nautical history. The collection includes paintings, photographs and memorabilia on the role of City Island in the yachting industry, America’s Cup challenges and Hell Gate Pilots. Situated on one of the island’s highest points in old Public School 17, Established in 1897.
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Coney Island Museum
1208 Surf Ave
Brooklyn
718-372-5159
Open Saturdays and Sundays throughout the year 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm. Admission: 99 cents

A Steeplechase Horse! Boardwalk Rolling Chair! Funhouse Mirrors! Artifacts of the amusement town’s heyday, as well as a visitor and research center.
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Ellis Island Immigration Museum
Ellis Island National Monument
Manhattan
(212) 363-3200
Ferry departs the Battery and LIberty state Park, NJ.

Three floors of exhibits chronicling the history of the immigration processing station, where 12 million steerage and third class passengers entered the United States between 1892 and 1954. The Main Building, an ornate French Renaissance Revival structure, houses the museum, a family history research center containing ship manifests and passenger lists, and library with a comprehensive oral history collection.
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Fraunces Tavern Museum
Museum of Colonial & Revolutionary NY
54 Pearl Street
Manhattan
www.frauncestavernmuseum.org
Built: 1719
Architect: restored by William Mercereau, 1907
Designation: NYC Landmark

Hours: Monday - Saturday 12:00 noon to 5:00 p.m. Closed Sundays. Admission: $4

Description: Revolutionary New York revolved around Manhattan's oldest building. The 1719 Georgian-style yellow brick house is the site of Samuel Fraunces Tavern (1762) where George Washington gave his farewell address to officers of the Continental Army in 1783 and later New York Yacht Club was founded. Sons of the Revolution, a genealogical organization preserving the memory of the struggle for liberty, purchased the property in 1904 for a museum.
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Governors Island National Monument
Governor's Island
Manhattan
212-514-8296
Hours: Open seasonally. Ferries will leave from the Battery Maritime Building. Free admission.

The historic district contains landmark Castle William and Fort Jay, and numerous historic buildings. The pivotal summit between President Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev took place here.
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Greenpoint Monitor Museum
Bushwick Inlet, Brooklyn
718-383-2637
Currently without a home.

Charted in 1996 to establish a home on the Brooklyn waterfront at the original homeport on Bushwick Inlet for the USS Monitor.
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Harbor Defense Museum
Fort Hamilton
230 Sheridan Loop
Brooklyn
Open Monday thru Friday 10:00 am - 4:00 pm and Saturday 10:oo am - 2:00 pm. Free admission.

Built: 1825, Fort construction
Designation: National Register, NYC Landmark.

The museum occupies Fort Hamilton’s caponier, a freestanding bastion located within the fort’s dry moat and features a fine collection of military artifacts from the Revolutionary War to World War II. In August 1776, the Battle of Long Island began here. It has a library and archive for public use.
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India House
1 Hanover Square
Manhattan
212-269-2323
Tours by appointment.

Founded as a private lunch club by merchant ship owners in 1914, India House preserves a collection of maritime art, which traces the history and expansion of American maritime commerce and includes the charter for the 1770 Marine Society of the City of New York
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Intrepid Sea-Air-Space Museum
Pier 86, North River
West 46th St
Manhattan
212-245-0072
Closed for renovation. Reopening November 2008.

A rare look at a grand military vessel, the 900-foot long aircraft carrier Intrepid together with the guided missile sub Growler, 25 military aircraft on the ships deck. and a 204-foot long Concorde supersonic jet.
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Maritime Industry Museum
Maritime College-State University of New York
6 Pennyfield Ave
Bronx
212-409-7218
Hours: Monday thru Saturday 9:00 am -4:00 pm, year-round. Free admission.

One of the largest collections of maritime industry artifacts in the nation from the Evolution of Seafaring exhibit and a scale model of Brooklyn Navy Yard in 1942 to models of famous passenger liners and underwater artifacts recovered from ships sunk in and around New York harbor.
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Noble Maritime Collection
Sailor's Snug Harbor
1000 Richmond Terrace, Building D
Snug Harbor, Staten island
Open Thursday thru Sunday, 1:00 – 5 :00 pm. Admission: $5.

The collection of maritime paintings, drawings and lithographs by artist John A. Noble and other maritime artists are housed in one of the buildings of the former sailor’s retirement complex, , designed by architect Minard Lafever in 1844. There is a maritime library and over 6,000 historical photographs.
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Museum of the City of New York
Maritime Collection
1220 5th Ave
Manhattan
212-534-1672
Hours: Tuesday - Sunday: 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM. Closed Mondays. Admission: $9.

An extensive collection of maritime artifacts, carved figureheads, nautical instruments and prints as well as, about 100 ship’s models and paintings by local marine artists.
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National Lighthouse Museum
30 Bay St # 700
Staten Island
(718) 556-1681
This project controlled by the NYC EDC is stalled in the water.

It will be housed in one of the six historic buildings a the former U.S. Lighthouse Service Depot, which beginning in 1862 assembled, tested and repaired lighthouses for close to a century. Five of the remaining buildings at the 10-acre site are on the National Register of Historic Places and the Administration Building is a New York City Landmark. The museum will a Fresnal lens, which is made of hundreds of pieces of glass, the range of which is only limited by the curvature of the earth. Plans call for the Romer Shoals lighthouse to be relocated to the museum.
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Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House
National Museum of the American Indian
1 Bowling Green
Manhattan
212-514-3700
Hours:. Open daily 10:00 am – 5:00 pm, Thu. to 8:00 pm. Free admission.

The Cass Gilbert Beaux Arts building abounds in shells, marine creatures, and sea signs that decorate the interior and features murals in the rotunda dome by New York painter Reginald Marsh (1898–1954) tracing the course of a ship entering New York Harbor.
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Seamen's Church Institute Gallery
241 Water St
Manhattan
212-349-9090
Open to the public.

A public gallery exhibiting a permanent collection of ships models, paintings and artifacts at one of the city’s oldest maritime institutions, which was founded in 1834 to minister to merchant seafarers.
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New York Yacht Club
37 W 44th St
Manhattan
(212) 382-1000
NYYC has an extensive model and nautical art collection, library and chart room. The Model Room contains 151 full rigged models and
approximately 1200 builders and half models. Unfortunately, the collection may only be viewed by members and their guests.

The club was founded in 1844 by John Cox Stevens and eight friends aboard Steven’s yacht Gimcrack while sailing in New York Harbor. On August 22, 1851, the schooner America won the 100 Guinea Cup (renamed America’s Cup) from the Royal Yacht Squadron by defeating 14 British yachts in a 53-mile race around Isle of Wight. The syndicate that captured the trophy later assigned the Cup to the New York Yacht Club with a Deed of Gift, under condition that it be preserved as a perpetual Challenge Cup for friendly competition between foreign nations. The trophy was renamed the America’s Cup.

The yachting fraternity has successfully defended 25 challenges. The first challenge race took place in Upper New York Bay off the coast of Staten Island on August 8, 1870. The first contest matched the schooner Cambria against 23 New York Yacht Club boats, the entire club fleet. The center-board schooner Magic won. In 1893, the series was moved to open seas off the New York coast and in 1930 the race was transferred to Newport, Rhode Island. America’s Cup is the oldest trophy in sports and the most coveted award in yachting. The Club’s 132 year hold on the trophy is the longest winning streak in sporting history. The landmark Manhattan clubhouse of NYYC displays the carved eagle escutcheon of the yacht America. The next America’s Cup contest will take place in 2007.
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Staten Island Museum
75 Stuyvesant Pl
Staten Island
718-727-1135
Hours: Tuesday - Friday 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm, Saturday 10am - 5pm and Sunday 12pm - 5pm. Admission: $2.

Founded in 1881, the collection features maritime art, shells, specimens, history archives and a library.
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Statue of Liberty Museum
Liberty Island
Manhattan
Hours: Open daily. Admission is free. Ferry operates from the Battery and Liberty state Park.

In the pedestal of Lady Liberty, the museum displays the original torch.
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Waterfront Museum & Showboat Barge
290 Conover St
Brooklyn
Hours: Visit by appointment or during scheduled programs.

Floating museum housed in a restored 1914 railroad barge, it is the only surviving wooden covered barge of the lighterage era still afloat. The museum has a permanent exhibit of artifacts, features exhibitions and serves as a classroom to bring maritime history to life for students and visitors.
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New York Historical Society
170 Central Park W
Manhattan
(212) 873-3400
Hours: Tuesday through Sunday 10:00 am - 6:00 pm. Admission: $10.

The cast-iron bell of Fulton's "Clermont" and the bell from the "General Slocum" reside here, along with numerous maritime paintings, scrimshaw and an extensive collection of Hudson River School landscapes and John James Audubon’s watercolors for “The Birds of America,” plus millions of manuscripts, maps, and books.
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James Brown House
Ear Inn, Inc.
326 Spring Street
Manhattan
Current use: Gallery/event space
Historic use: Sailors' Tavern
Built: 1817
Structure: Wooden frame house with brick facade
Designation: NYC Landmark, State & National Register of Historic Places

Description: When built, the Federal-style house stood at the water's edge. The house retains many original details, however landfilling has placed it over a block away from the river. James Brown was an African-American Revolutionary War veteran who operated a tobacco shop on the ground floor and lived upstairs in the early 19th Century. A bar has operated here since 1835.
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American Seamen's Friend Society Sailor's Home & Institute
507 West St at Jane St
Manhattan
Hotel
Current use: Riverview Hotel
Historic Use: Sailors' Lodging
Built: 1908
Architect: William A. Boring

Description: The port of New York was at its peak when the widow of Russell Sage financed this home offering inexpensive lodging for sailor's, a bowling alley, concert hall and other amenities. A beacon illuminated the river from the observation tower. The surviving crew of the Titanic stayed here April 1912.
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John Wolfe Ambrose Monument
, US
Erected: 1936
Sculptor: Andrew O'Connor
Owner: NYC Parks

Description: The Irish-American engineer, John Wolfe Ambrose (1838-1899) responsible for the deep sea channel stretching from the Narrows to the ocean. Ambrose attended NYU and Princeton University, presided over the Brooklyn Wharf & Dock Co. and was influential in much of the city’s maritime infrastructure. He lobbied Congress for forty years for funds build a channel 2,000 feet wide and 40 feet deep, which could accomodate larger ships and open Brooklyn's port to more commerce. The resulting Ambrose Channel improved the viability of the port by cutting the distance into the port by six miles.

The life-size bronze bust of Ambrose looks out on the Harbor today from a pedestal located in the south wall of the concession building.
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East Coast Memorial
Erected: 1963
Sculptor: Albino Manca - Eagle
Designer: Architects Gehron & Seltzer
Owner: NYC Parks

Description: The World War II East Coast Memorial overlooking the Statue of Liberty commemorates those servicemen who died in the service of their country in the waters of the Atlantic Ocean during World War II. The centerpiece is a bronze eagle sitting on an ocean wave and holding a laurel wreath. Four 19-foot granite pylons flank the axis and are inscribed with the names of the 4,609 missing in the waters of the Atlantic.
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American Merchant Marine Memorial
Battery Park
Erected: 1991
Sculptor: Marisol Escobar

Description: Four bronze figures and a lifeboat are depicted. Two sailors look seaward while a third reaches to grasp the outstretched hand of a drowning seaman, who is only visible at low tide. The names of 6,700 merchant seamen lost in WWI and WWII are encapsulated here. The monument is built on a breakwater just south of Pier A.
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John Ericcson Statue
Battery Park
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The Immigrants
Battery Park
Erected: 1983
Sculptor: Luis Sanguino

Description:
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Admiral Dewey Memorial
Erected: 1973
Sculptor: Daniel Chester French

Description:
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Norwegian Maritime Monument
Erected: 1982
Fabricator: A. Ottavino Corp

Description:
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Emma Lazarus Memorial
Battery Park
Erected: 1955
Gift of the Federation of Jewish Women's Organizations, Inc.

Description: The bronze plaque on Israel limestone honors the author of the poem inscribed on the Statue of Liberty: "THE NEW COLOSSUS"

NOT LIKE THE BRAZEN GIANT OF GREEK FAME, WITH CONQUERING LIMBS ASTRIDE FROM LAND TO LAND. HERE AT OUR SEA-WASHED, SUNSET GATES SHALL STAND A MIGHTY WOMAN WITH A TORCH, WHOSE FLAME IS THE IMPRISONED LIGHTNING, AND HER NAME MOTHER OF EXILES, FROM HER BEACON-HAND GLOWS WORLD-WIDE WELCOME; HER MILD EYES COMMAND THE AIR-BRIDGED HARBOR THAT TWIN CITIES FRAME.

"KEEP ANCIENT LANDS, YOUR STORIED POMP!" CRIES SHE WITH SILENT LIPS, "GIVE ME YOUR TIRED, YOUR POOR,YOUR HUDDLED MASSES YEARNING TO BREATHE FREE.

THE WRETCHED REFUSE OF YOUR TEEMING SHORE SEND THESE, THE HOMELESS, TEMPEST-TOST TO ME. I LIFT MY LAMP BESIDE THE GOLDEN DOOR!"
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Prison Ship Martyr's Memorial
Fort Greene Park
Dekalb Avenue
Brooklyn
Erected: 1908
Designer: McKim, Meade and White

Description: Atop a hill, the tall Doric column crowned with a bronze urn lit as an “eternal flame” to commemorate the 11,000 men, women and children who perished aboard British Prison Ships during the Revolutionary War.
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Slocum Memorial Fountain
Tompkins Square Park
E 10th Street
Manhattan
Erected: 1906
Sculptor: Jonathon Scott

Description: The fountain made of pink Tennessee marble featuring a lionshead spout and a relief of two children looking out to sea commemorates the 1,021 lives lost when the triple-decker wooden side paddler "General Slocum" caught fire in the East River on June 15, 1904. The charter boat was carrying German immigrants, most from the surrounding neighborhood, to an annual picnic when fire forced the craft to beach on North Brother Island. Every year a ceremony is held to honor the victims.
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Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument
Riverside Park
89th Street & Riverside Drive
Manhattan
Erected: 1902
Sculptor: Paul E. Duboy
Architect: Stoughton & Stoughton

Description: Designed in the style of the City Beautiful movement, the temple-like structure containing 12 Corinthian columns lifting a pyramid-shaped dome surrounded by plazas is a Civil War memorial to soldiers and sailors who served the Union.
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Chelsea Soldiers' & Sailors' Monument
9th Ave & 28th St
New York, NY 10001, US
Erected: 1920

Description: WWI memorial
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Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Arch
Grand Army Plaza
Brooklyn
Triumphal Arch
Erected: 1892
Sculptor: Philip Martiny (spandrel figures)
Architect: John Hemingway Duncan

Description:

Sculpture of Columbia
Erected: 1898
Sculptor: Frederick William MacMonnies
Architect: Stanford White

Description:

The Navy: American Sailors At Sea Urged On By the Genius of Patriotism
Erected: 1901
Sculptor:Frederick William MacMonnies
Architect: Stanford White
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Soldiers', Sailors', Marines' & Airmen's Club
283 Lexington Ave
Manhattan
Established: 1919

Description: Hotel exclusively for members of the armed forces founded with the support of General John J. Pershing under the name the Soldiers' and Sailors' Club to accommodate returning troops of WWI.
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Merchant Marine Plaque
Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House
1 Bowling Green
Manhattan
Erected: 1921

Plaque reads:
"These men rendered one of the greatest services that could have been done for our nation and civilization's cause. Hundreds of precious lives were lost - a loss that can never be made up by their country." - President Warren Harding
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Keller Hotel
150 Barrow St
Manhattan
Current use: SRO
Historic use: Sailor's Lodging
Historic name: Knickerbocker Hotel
Built: 1998
Architect: Julius Munckwitz
Builder: William Farrell

Description: Ideally located near the steamship wharves and ferry landing, the Renaissance revival Keller is one of the last surviving and largely intact early riverfront hotels.
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Holland Hotel
397 West St
Manhattan
Current use: SRO
Historic use: Seailor's lodgings
Built: 1903
Architect: Charles Stegmayer
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: 3-story, neo- Renaissance hotel in the Weehawken Street Historic District.
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Mariner's Temple
12 Oliver St
Chatham Sq,
Manhattan
Current Use: Baptist Church
Historic Use: Baptist Church
Built: 1844
Architect: Isaac Lucas
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: The Greek revival brownstone temple was the first church in New York City and the nation devoted exclusively to sailors who docked at the port. It is also the country's oldest continuously operating Baptist Church. The Oliver Street Baptist Church was founded as Fayette Street Baptist in 1797, it was rebuilt in 1800 and again in 1819. It burned down in 1843 and was restored the following year and renamed Mariner's.

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Seamen's Church Institute
241 Water St
Manhattan
Current Use: Seafarer's Services
Historic Use: Schermerhorn Ship Chandlery
Built: 1989
Designed by Polshek & Partners

Description: The headquarters of SCI in the rebuilt former Schermerhorn Ship Chandlery, a red-brick building dating back to 1800. Founded in 1834, when the ministry operated from floating chapels, it is the largest mariners’ agency in North America today offering seafarer's professional training programs, legal services and advocacy. The institute was at South Street and Coenties Slip from 1913 to 1968. The Titanic Memorial Lighthouse that is now located at the entrance to the Seaport District topped the building.
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Danish Seamen's Church
102 Willow St
Brooklyn
718-875-0042
Established: 1957

Description: The Danish Seamen's Church of NY was founded in 1878.
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Sailor's Snug Harbor
Snug Harbor Cultural Center
1000 Richmond Ter # 11
Staten Island
Current use: Cultural Center, since the 1970s
Historic use: Seafarer's retirement
Built: 1831
Architect: Minard Lafever
Designation: National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Landmark: entire 83 acre site; NYC Landmarks include:
* Five Greek Revival buildings (Bldgs A, B, C, D & E)
* Interior of the John J. Marchi Exhibition Hall, Bldg C
* Veterans Memorial Hall
* Perimeter Iron Fence
* North Gatehouse

Description: Retirement campus for "aged decrepit and worn out sailors" situated on the banks of the Kill Von Kull, a narrow channel connecting Newark Bay with the Upper Bay of New York Harbor. Eight main buildings, used as dormitories and mess halls, are connected by corridors of brick and stone, thus obviating the necessity of the Home's guests walking outside during inclement weather.Sailors' Snug Harbor was founded by Robert Randall, Esq., of New York City, whose last will and testament - drawn by Alexander Hamilton, on June 1, 1801 - bequeathed almost his entire estate for the establishment and maintenance of a home for aged and disabled sailors. Mr. Randall's estate, a twenty acre farm, occupied the site of what now is valuable property in Manhattan. It lies between Fourth and Fifth Avenues, and Sixth and Tenth Streets. Thomas Melville, brother of Herman Melville, Moby Dick’s famed author administered the institution from 1867-1884 expanding the facility to accomode up to 800 men.


Source: Federal Writers' Project 1939
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Seamen's Retreat
Bayley-Seton Hospital
75 Vanderbilt Ave
Clifton, Staten Island
Current Use: Hospital
Historic Use: Sailor's Home
Built: 1834
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: The granite Greek Revival hospital building (1850s) and physician-in-chief's residence (1842) last from the old Seaman's Retreat. Established in 1831 by the New York legislature and supported by a tax (which was later declared unconstitutional) on each ship entering the port the facility was charged with caring for sick and disabled seamen. The property was operated by the State until 1883 when it came under the U.S. Public Health Service replacing a hospital it lost on Bedloe (Liberty) Island due to the construction of the Statue of Liberty. It closed in 1981, was taken over by Sisters of Charity of New York as Bayley-Seton Hospital, and closed to sell the property in 2005.
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Seafarers' Safe Haven
Prospect Park YMCA
357 9th Street
Brooklyn
Active sailor's housing
Established: 1931

Description: Maintains 12 rooms for retired seafarers, who must have seven years of maritime industry service, providing health care and other services. Local students created a one-hour documentary about the residents of Seamen's House
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Seafarers & International House
123 E 15th St
Manhattan
Current Use: Hotel
Historic Use: Hotel

Description: The Evangelical Lutheran Church has been ministering to seafarers on merchant ships in northeastern ports since 1873. The seafarer guesthouse provides affordable accommodation and service to visiting mariners.
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United Seamen's Service
635 4th Ave
Brooklyn
(718) 369-3818
Established: 1942

Description: Promoting the welfare of seamen since 1942 and supplying seagoing libraries to the American Merchant Marine, the U.S. Navy, the U.S. Coast Guard, and to seafarers of allied nations through its affiliate, the American Merchant Marine Library Association, Public Library of the High Seas since 1921.
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Deaconess Home & Hospital
Lutheran Medical Center
150 55th St
Brooklyn
Historic Use: Foundry
Current Use: Hospital

Originally located at 46th Street and 4th avenue, the Hospital was started by Sister Elizabeth Fedde, a Norwegian Lutheran Deaconess-Nurse called "the borrowed sister" who came from Norway to Brooklyn in 1883 to minister to Norwegian seafarers. The center moved to the American Machine & Foundry Co. building in 1970.
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Henry McFarlane House
New York Yacht Club
30 Hylan Blvd.
Staten Island
Built: 1841
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: Home the the NYYC from 1868 to 1871, years when the club successfully defended the America's Cup off the coast of Staten Island. the property is presently owned by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation.
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The Old Stone Jug
Neville-Tysen House
806 Richmond Terrace
New Brighton, Staten Island
Current Use: Private residence
Historic use: Sailor's Tavern
Built: 1770
Owner: Private
Designation: NYC Landmark, National Register of Historic Places

Description: One of the earliest surviving pre-Revolutionary War country houses in New York City. Originally a farmhouse built by Jacob Tysen, converted to a saloon serving the retired sailors of Snug Harbor and later the residence of retired naval officer Captain John Neville in the 1870s.
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Robert Richard Randall
Snug Harbor Cultural Center
Erected: 1884
Sculptor: Augustus St. Gaudens

Description: Life size bronze statue stands on a granite pedestal honoring the benefactor of Sailors' Snug Harbor. this is a duplicate of St. Gauden's original piece which relocated to South Carolina with the Sailor's Rest Home
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The Watering Place
Victory Blvd & Bay St
Staten Island, NY 10301, US
Erected: 1925

Description: "Near this spot early colonial navigators replenished their ships supply of water from a spring well known to those anchoring inside the Narrows before the year 1623." So reads the inscription on the bronze plaque on the face of a natural boulder.
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Hart Island Nike Missile Site
Hart Island
Bronx
The 101-acre island once served as a prison camp for Confederate soldiers. The U.S. Navy had a disciplinary barracks here during WWII and beginning in 1955 for seven years of the Cold War the U.S. Army Air Defense Command established a "Nike" missile launcher area (NY15). remnants of piers built by the Army to transport missiles survive on the western shore. Today, the Corrections Department manages the city's "Potter's Field" cemetery for more than 800,000 unclaimed dead. There is no public access to the island.
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Brooklyn Navy Yard
U.S. Navy Yard
63 Flusing Ave
Brooklyn
Shipyard Active: 1801 - 1964
Current use: Industrial Park & active drydocks
Designation: Drydock No. 1, Naval Hospital, and Surgeon's House are NYC Landmarks.

Description: The 300-acre historic waterfront site where the USS Monitor was commissioned, the steamship Fulton constructed in 1815, the USS Maine launched in 1890, and the battleships Arizona and Missouri were built, was once America's number-one ship-building center. Four of the six docks are still in operation, including the more than 150-year-old granite Drydock No. 1. The yard began building ships to help fight piracy on the Barbary Coast, went on to make frigates for the War of 1812 carrying on to construct battleships for World War II, its peak years employing 60,000 people.

WPA GUIDE TO NEW YORK CITY (1939):
"The yard is traversed by more than five miles of paved streets, and contains four drydocks ranging in length from 326 to 700 feet, two huge steel shipways, and six big pontoons and cylindrical floats for salvage work. In addition to the numerous foundries, machine shops, and warehouses it has barracks for marines, a power plant, a large radio station, and a railroad spur."

Sites at the Navy Yard:
• Drydock No. 1, Dock St. at foot of 3rd. St., whose huge basin employing the original pumps is a long as the Empire State Building is tall.
• U.S. Naval Hospital (1838) and Surgeon’s House (1863) , and a military burial ground.
• Admiral’s Row is a street lined with ten dilapidated officer's houses built between 1864 and 1901, which may be torn down to make way for a supermarket.

There is no public access at this time, though the Sands Street Gatehouse is being restored into a Visitors Center to reveal the history of the Yard.

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Brookland Ferry Landing
Fulton Ferry Landing
Brooklyn
"BROOKLAND FERRY LANDING
FROM WHICH POINT THE AMERICAN ARMY
EMBARKED DURING THE NIGHT
OF AUGUST 29TH 1776
UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
GENERAL GEORGE WASHINGTON
ABLY ASSISTED BY
COLONEL JOHN GLOVER
OF MARBLEHEAD, MASSACHUSETTS
ERECTED BY THE
BROOKLYN BRIDGE PLAZA ASSOCIATION
1929"
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Christopher Columbus
New York State Supreme Court Building
Montague and Court Street
Brooklyn
Erected: 1867
Sculptor: Emma Stebbins

Description:
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Commander Eugene S. Sarsfield Flagstaff
Sarsfield Playground
Flatlands Ave & E 38th St
Brooklyn
"Dedicated to the memory of Commander Eugene S. Sarfield U.S. Navy who went down with his ship the "USS Maddox" in the invasion of Sicily July 10, 1943."
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Dover Patrol Monument
John Paul Jones Park
4th Avenue and 101st Street
Brooklyn
Erected: 1931
Architect: Sir Astor Webb P.R.A.. & Son

Inscription: TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN EVERLASTING REMEMBRANCE OF THE DOVER PATROL 1914-1919. THEY DIED THAT WE MIGHT LIVE. MAY WE BE WORTHY OF THEIR SACRIFICE.

THIS MONUMENT TO THE DOVER PATROL ERECTED AS A TRIBUTE TO THE COMRADESHIP AND SERVICE OF THE AMERICAN NAVAL FORCES IN EUROPE DURING THE WORLD WAR. MONUMENTS OS IDENTICAL DESIGN AT DOVER ENGLAND--CAP BLANC NE FRANCE--NEW YORK, NY.
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John Paul Jones
John Paul Jones Park
Fort Hamilton Pkwy and 101st Street
Brooklyn
Erected: 1980

Description: A monument honoring John Paul Jones, Father of the U.S. Navy features a flagpole refabricated from the mast of the USS Daniel (No. 335) by Lt. Alton Douglas and the crew of the USS Seattle.

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Leiv Eiriksson
Leif Ericson Park
4th Ave & 66th St
Brooklyn, NY 11220, US
Erected: 1939
Sculptor: August Werner

Insription: LEIV EIRIKSSON
DISCOVERED AMERICA YEAR 1000
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Monitor Memorial
Monsignor Mcgolrick Park
Monitor Street
Brooklyn
Erected: 1938
Sculptor: Antonio de Filippo

Description:
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Robert Fulton
Robert Fulton Park
Fulton Street and Lewis Ave.
Brooklyn
Erected: 1955
Sculptor: Caspar Buberl

Description:
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Verrazzano Memorial Flagstaff
St. John J Carty Park
Fort Hamilton Pkwy & 95th
Brooklyn
Erected: 1964
Sculptor: Albino Manca

Description:
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Washington A. Roebling Memorial
Columbus Park
Court St. and Montague St.
Brooklyn
Erected: 1973
Sculptor: S. Hemming
Foundry: Bronze Arts & Crafts Co, Bkln
Fabricator: Brooklyn Monument Co., Inc.

Description: Bas relief plaque
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Christopher Columbus
Columbus Square
31st Street & Astoria Blvd.
Queens
Erected: 1941
Sculptor: Angelo Racioppi

Description: Large sculpture of Columbus standing on pedestal. A NYC Works Progress Administration (WPA) art project.
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Soldiers and Sailors Monument
Major John W Mark Park
Hillside Ave. and 175th St.
Queens
Erected: 1896
Sculptor: Frederick Wellington Ruckstull

Description: Standing angel holding a laurel wreath in her left hand and a palm bough in her right.
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Christopher Columbus
D'auria Murphy Square
E 183rd Street and Adams Place
Bronx
Erected: 1926
Sculptor: Attilio Piccirilli

Description: Carrara marble bust of Italian explorer in atop a granite base.
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Admiral David Glasgow Farragut
Madison Square Park
E. 26th St. and Madison Avenue
Manhattan
Erected: 1881
Sculptor: Augustus Saint-Gaudens
Architect: Stanford White

Description: Bronze standing figure of the first Admiral of the U.S. Navy who shouted "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!" from high on the ship's mast during the Civil War battle of Mobile Bay. The pedestal of the statue features ocean waves cresting over a sword, the figures of "Loyalty" and "Courage" and dolphins.
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Commandant's House
Admiral Perry Plaza
Evans St & Little St
Brooklyn
Quarter's A
Current Use: Private residence
Historic Use: Navy Yard Commandant's Quarters
Built: 1806
Architect: Charles Bulfinch
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: Federal-style three-story white clapboard Commandant's House, was the Navy Yard’s oldest building, in private ownership since 1964. Matthew C. Perry resided here when commanding officer of the yard from 1841 to 1843.
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Christopher Columbus Monument Fountain
Central Park S & 59th St
Manhattan
Erected: 1965

Description: The ornate fountain is a gift to the city George T. Delacorte, Dell Publishing Company Foundation.
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Columbus Monument
Columbus Circle
Manhattan
Erected: 1892
Sculptor: Gaetano Russo

Description: Columbus, sculpted of Carrara marble, is perched atop a 26-foot-high granite column over the circling traffic. A gift to the city from Italian Americans through newspaper Il Progresso Italo Americano.
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East River Park Anchor
East River Park
FRD Drive at Grand Street
Manhattan
Cast: mid-1800s
Erected: 1970

Description: The old anchor, believed to be donated by the F&M Schaefer Brewing Company, commemorates the shipbuilding industry that once thrived on Corlear's Hook. William T. Brown's Yard, at the foot of E 12th Street, built the schooner yacht America, designed by George Steers for the New York Yacht Club. The Crocker & Fickett yard built the full-rigged steamship Savannah in 1812, which was the first to cross the Atlantic in 1819 and sank off Fire Island. As many as 30 yards lined the riverfront by the mid-1800s, including the Thomas & Steers yard, Webb & Allen yard, and the Bishop & Simonson shipyard.

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U. S. Naval Hospital
Brooklyn Navy Yard
Flushing Ave & Ryerson St
Brooklyn
Naval Hospital
Built: 1938
Architect: Martin E. Thompson
Designation: NYC Landmark

Surgeon's House
Built: 1863
Architect: True W. Rollins & Charles Hasting
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: The Naval hospital was built in the Greek Revival style of Westchester marble. Confederate prisoners of Civil War were held in tis basement. The chief surgeons house built nearby and a military cemetery at the corner of South St. The Naval Annex site encompasses 28-acres and is set aside from the Industrial Park.
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Todd Shipyard
Erie Basin
1 Beard Street
Red Hook , Brooklyn
Ikea Store
Active shipyard: Robins Dry Dock Co.1864-1916; Todd Shipyard 1916-1980s
Graving Dock No. 1: 1886-2005

Description: The shipyard established by William Todd was the leading independent ship builder and repair yard in the country in the 20th century, playing a pivotal role in World War II. The history of the company mirrors the history of shipbuilding in America. The engines and propeller of the USS Monitor were built by DeLameter Iron Works (aka Erie Basin Dry Dock Co.), later merged with Robins Dry Dock & Repair Co.(1904) where a young William Todd ascended to company president and finally owner. 1983 was a peak year with Todd operating seven shipyards around the country, yet by 1987 the company was bankrupt. today, it still operates as Todd Pacific Shipyard Corp. In 1986, the Brooklyn yard was sold to Rodermond Industries, which failed in the 1990s. The Red Hook Graving Dock continued operation under United States Dredging Co.

Originally, Graving Dock 1 was built of timber by excavating the basin to a length of 540 feet, later enlarged to 600 feet, and in 1928 it was completely rebuilt out of concrete and steel to 750 feet. It's twin, Graving Dock 2 was buried under landfill in the 1970s.

The remnants of the Yard, including the working graving dock and 1860s Pump House, were
demolished to make room for the parking lot of the world's largest Ikea.
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Caddell Dry Dock
Ft of Broadway
Kill van Kull
Staten Island
(718) 442-2112
Active: 1903 - Present

Description: The oldest shipyard operation in New York Harbor services 300 vessels annually at six dry docks.

A New Look at a Dry Dock
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Caddell Dry Dock East Yards
Ft of Bement Ave
Kill van Kull
West Brighton, Staten Island
Established:

Former site of Brewer Dry Dock Co. yard purchased by Caddell in 1972. A dry dock is a dock that can be emptied of water while a ship is being repaired.
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Navy Terrace Plaque
Central Park
Manhattan
Erected: 1947

Inscription:
NAVY TERRACE NAMED IN HONOR OF
THE MEN AND WOMEN OF NEW YORK CITY
WHO SERVED THEIR COUNTRY DURING THE WORLD WARS IN THE UNITED STATES NAVY UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS UNITED STATES COAST GUARD DEDICATED MAY 24, 1947.
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May Ship Repair
3075 Richmond Terrace
Kill Von Kull
Staten Island
(718) 442-9700
Current use: Active ship repair yard
Historic use:
- Burlee Dry Dock Co. [1885-1907]
- Staten Island Shipbuilding [1907-1929]
- United Drydocks Co. [1929-1938]
- Bethlehem Steel [1938-1960]

Description: The shipyard began as Burlee, a builder of wooden vessels, and merged with Port Richmond Ironworks. A foundry was added in 1916 for the construction of steel ships. United Shipyard built the Gibbs & Cox designed Mahan-class destroyers, Mahan and Cummings(1935) and the modified Dunlap-class, Dunap and Fanning (1936) for the U.S. Navy. As Bethlehem Steel built destroyers, landing craft, cargo vessels and tugs. Between 1950-51, the Merrell Class Staten Island Ferry was constructed here. The yard is stilled for ship repair.
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Kosnac Floating Derrick Co.
Towing, Tugboats
1435 Richmond Terrace
Kill Van Kull , Staten Island
718-876-5447
Established: 1920
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Townsend & Downey Shipyard
Shooters Island
Kill Von Kull
Staten Island
Bird Sanctuary
Operated: 1900-1910

Description: Builder of cruising and racing yachts, including the Meteor, built for the emperor of Germany, Kaiser Wilhelm II. The luxury yacht launched in 1902 with President Theodore Roosevelt and two thousand other guests at the ceremonies filmed by Thomas Edison. In 1903, they built the record-breaking 3-masted schooner Atlantic designed by William Gardner that held the TranAtlantic speed record for monohulls for 100 years, beaten in 2005. Major docks and shipways were located on the eastern shore. Abandoned for much of the 20th century, only a few decaying piers remain. The island is now a protected sanctuary for nesting wading birds.
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International Mercantile Marine Co. Building
United States Lines
No. 1 Broadway
Manhattan
Citibank
Built: 1884
Architect: Edward H Kendall; reclad 1919-21 Walter B. Chambers
Designation: National Register

Description: Renaissance Revival skyscraper built for the headquarters of the International Mercantile Marine Co., owner of the Titanic. IMM was a trust that combined White Star, American, Red Star, Atlantic Transport, and Leyland lines organized in 1902 by J.P. Morgan to monopolize shipping worldwide.

A plaque on the building reads: Adjoining this site was the first Dutch fort on Manhattan Island, known as Fort New Amsterdam.
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Cunard Lines Building
United States Post Office
25 Broadway
Manhattan
Built: 1921
Architect: Benjamin Wistar Morris, Carrère & Hastings
Historic Use: Cunard Lines ticket office
Present Use: Standard & Poors Building
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: The Cunard Line opened its first New York office in 1848. In the 1920s, it merged with the Titanic's parent company, the White Star Line, to become the largest passenger ship line in world. Cunard is now part of Carnival Cruise Lines.

"Built as a ticket office for the Cunard Passenger Ship Line, the grand interior of the Great Hall shows how the popular Beaux Art style was adapted to a new use. The architect collaborated with muralist Ezra Winter to produce a decorative program focused on shipping themes, set within a huge vaulted space that recalls Roman bath buildings. In contrast to the ceremonial Great Hall, the exterior is a simple Renaissance facade topped with a relatively undistinguished high-rise. The Great Hall was converted into a branch of the U.S. Postal Service in 1977." (Source: NYC-Architecture)

Benjamin Wistar Morris was the original architect of Rockefeller Center, and designed the Metropolitan Opera and the Queen Mary.
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Munson Beaver Building
New York Cocoa Exchange
92 Beaver St
Manhattan
Current Use: Luxury Condo Building
Historic Use: Office Building
Built: 1904
Architect: Clinton & Russell
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: Designed in the neo-Renaissance-style with a lobby done in white Carerra marble, the building housed the Munson Steamship Company from 1904 to 1921. Munson operated shipping lines to South America. From 1931 until 1972 it was residence to the New York Cocoa Exchange, the world's first cocoa futures market.
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Empire Building
71 Broadway
Manhattan
Built: 1898
Architect: Francis Kimball & G. Kramer Thompson
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: The steel-framed building was the headquarters of U.S. Steel Corporation from 1901 until 1976, and housed the company owned Bessemer Steamship Line. In 1901, tenants included the American Line and Red Star Line, which merged into the International Mercantile Marine Co. the following year as well as Isthmian Steamship Lines Company.
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Munson Steamship Building
67 Wall St
Manhattan
Current Use: Residential Tower
Historic Use: Office Building
Built: 1906
Architect: Kenneth M. Murchison

Description: The 25-story wedge-shaped tower served as headquarters to Munson Steamship, which began with a line to Cuba and eventually carried passenger and cargo between the U. S., the Caribbean and South America.


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New York CruiseTerminal
Piers 88, 90 & 92
711 12th Ave at 49th St
North River , Manhattan
Built: 1935

Description: The "Luxury Liner Row" piers were constructed to accommodate larger steamships replacing Chelsea Piers as the main passenger port o' call. Formerly called the Passenger Ship Terminal, it contains three finger piers 1,000 feet long and about 400 feet apart offering five berths. It was renovated in 1970 and is currently undergoing a redesign to handle larger cruise ships.
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Pier 40, Holland-America Lines
Hudson River Park
Ft of W Houston St.
North River, Manhattan
Built: 1954

Description: Holland-America built the 14.5-acre square wharf to serve both the transatlantic passenger and cargo trade. It is the largest pier on the river. In the lobby, a 12-by-20-foot mural by Frank Nix shows a map of Europe with Holland America's ports of call and the four vessels that sailed under the name Rotterdam, as well as symbols including the Atomium built for the 1958 Brussels World's Fair. The company's Cruise Ship Lines used the pier by 1970, then relocated their headquarters to Seattle in 1983. The pier was subsequently used as a warehouse and Federal Express distribution center. The wharf is currently part parking garage and recreation complex.
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Pier 59 - 62, Chelsea Piers
Chelsea Piers Sports Complex
W 23rd St. at Hudson River
Manhattan
Built: 1910
Architect: Warren and Wetmore (designers of Grand Central Terminal)

Description: The old headhouses connect the piers located between 17th and 23rd Streets along the Hudson River which were designed to handle large oceanliners. The piers were slated for demolition in the 1970s, but were adapted by private interests reopning in 1995 as a large sports and recreation complex including skating rink, golf driving range, marina and bowling alley.
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Pier 76, United States Line Pier
NYC Tow Pound
W 36th St
North River, Manhattan
Built:

Description: The former port for United States Line is now home to the Manhattan Tow Pound and NYPD Mounted Unit.
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Pier 57, Grace & French Lines
W 15th St.
North River, Manhattan
Built: 1952
Engineer: Emil Praeger
Designation: National Registers of Historic Places

Description: A floating pier supported by three buoyant, hollow caissons was utilized by W. R. Grace Company until 1969. The pier housed Marine & Aviation and was later occupied by the municipal bus depot until 2003.
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Pier 54, Cunard White Star Lines
Hudson River Park
W 13th St & West St
North River, Manhattan
Built: 1910
Designed by Warren and Wetmore

Description: Built as part of the Chelsea Piers, the open pier has a steel arch at the entrance which is a remnant of the old pier shed. The RMS Carpathia returned to Pier 54 after discharging survivors of the Titanic disaster. In 1915, the Lusitania departed from this pier on her maiden voyage before being sunk by German torpedoes.
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National Maritime Union of America
Joseph Curran Plaza 100 9th Ave.
Joseph Curran Annex 346 W 17th St.
Manhattan
The Maritime Hotel
Current use: Hotel
Historic Use: Maritime Union Headquarters
Built: 1966
Architect: Albert C. Ledner

Designation:

Description: The 12-story white-tile building with porthole windows was built for the sailors' union. Once the union's main building, originally called the Joseph Curran Annex (346 W 17th) and Curran Plaza (199 9th Ave.), after the union's founding president. The front walls slope at 8.5 degrees to meet zoning requirements that the structure have a 20-foot setback above 85 feet. In 1987, the City wanted to condemn the structure to make the building a prison, but was outbid Covenant House, who used the building as a shelter for runaway teens. It was sold to New York Service Center for Chinese Study Fellows in 1996 and was purchased in 2001 and converted to the Maritime Hotel.

Between 1954 and 1967 Albert C. Ledner, AIA, designed 14 projects for the National Maritime Union. Four were built in New York; all are expressive mid-century modern. In 2003 the dormitory building was reborn as the signature Maritime Hotel.(Source: Historic District Council)

The National Maritime Union (NMU) was an American labor union founded in May 1937. It affiliated with the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) in July 1937. After a failed merger in 1988, the union merged with the Seafarers International Union of North America in 2001. (Wikipedia)

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Curran Building
St. Vincent's Hospital Bldg
36 7th Ave
Manhattan
Current Use: Office Building
Historic Use: National Maritime Union Office Building
Built: 1964
Architect: Albert C. Leder
Designation:

Description: One of the four buildings in the National Maritime Union's New York City complex. It is named for Joseph Curran the first and only president of the sailor's union. The future of the Curran/O'Toole Building will be determined as Saint Vincent's Hospital moves forward with its plans for a new hospital. (Source: Historic District Council)
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Moran Towing
2015 Richmond Terrace
Kill Van Kull, Staten Island
Established: 1860

Description: The oldest and largest supplier of tugs on the U.S. East and Gulf coasts.
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K-Sea Tranportation
3245 Richmond Terrace
Kill Van Kull , Staten Island
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Reinauer Transportation Companies
1983 Richmond Terrace
Kill Van Kull, Staten Island
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McAllister Towing
3165 Richmond Terrace
Kill Van Kull , Staten Island
Established: 1864
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New York Container Terminal
Howland Hook
300 Western Ave
Arthur Kill, Staten Island
Established:

Description: Built by American Export Lines, the terminal was purchased in 1973 by the City of New York for $47.5 million. In 1985, The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey leased the terminal from the City for a period of 38 years. The Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan bought the marine container terminal in 2006 for for $2.4 billion. The Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan is one of Canada's largest institutional investors.
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GMD Shipyard
Brooklyn Navy Yard
Bldg 595
Brooklyn
(718) 260-9200
GMD offers two graving docks and wet berth capabilities.

A graving dock is an artificial basin for holding a ship for graving or cleaning the bottom and repair. Gates close and water pumped out.
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Pier A, NYC Dept of Docks & Ferries
Battery Pl & West St
Manhattan
Current Use: Possible excursion boat terminal
Historic Use: Fire station, Dept. of Docks
Built: 1886, three-story pierhead added 1900
Engineer: George Sears Greene
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: The oldest covered pier in Manhattan built to house the NYC department of Docks and Ferries. The pier later served as station for FDNY Marine Company No. 1. The clock tower, erected in 1919 as a WWI memorial, tolls hours in ship bells. Redevelopment plans for the pier have been delayed by litigation.
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Gansevoort Peninsula
Piers 52 & 53
Gansevoort St at 10th Ave
North River, Manhattan
FDNY Marine Co. One
From 1866 until 1885, Herman Melville worked out of this address as a customs agent, inspecting cargo arriving at the Gansevoort Street wharves. Currently the site of a former Department of Sanitation incinerator and marine transfer station.
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Pier 94, Cunard Freight
Unconvention Center
12th Ave & 55th St
Manhattan
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Pier 66A, B&O RR Float Bridge
Hudson River Park
West 26th St & 11th Ave
North River, Manhattan
Marine-Rail
Current Use: Park
Historic Use: Rail Barge Transfer Bridge
Built: 1954
Designation: National Register

Description: Cross-Hudson barges transported goods, such as cattle and sheep, by rail car from New Jersey to the B&O Freight Terminal in Manhattan from 1954 to 1973.
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Bowling Green Offices Building
White Star Line
5-11 Broadway
Manhattan
Built: 1898
Architect: W & G Audsley
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: The building was ccupied by steamship
companies, including White Star Line ticket office (No. 3 Broadway) and the International Mercantile Marine Co. prior to its purchase of No. 1 Broadway.
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Whitehall Building
Maritime Assn of the Port of NY-NJ
17 Battery Pl
Manhattan
Current Use: Office Building
Historic Use: Steamship Row offices
Built: 1904
Architect: Henry J. Hardenbergh, Clinton & Russell (1910 addition)
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: The Renaissance Revival office tower takes its name from Peter Stuyvesant's home, which was located nearby. Completed in two stages, the structure features unobstructed harbor views and remains home to many maritime entities. Tenants include: (PAST) Hansa Line, Booth Line, Barber Line, Lloyd's Register of Shipping, International Mercantile Marine Company (1904), (PRESENT) The Marine Society of New York, International Longshoremen’s Union, the Maritime Association, Circle Line, National Cargo Bureau, and McAllister Towing.
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Maritime Exchange Building
80 Broad St
Manhattan
Current Use: Office Building
Historic Use: Shipping Trade Offices
Built: 1931
Architect: Sloan & Robertson
Designation:

Description: The Maritime Exchange was a center for shipping logistics and operations of New York harbor. Seahorses mark the entrance and a recently restored Art Deco ceiling mural in the lobby by Lillian Gaertner Palmedo depicts a scene of ships at sea.
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Battery Maritime Building
11 South St
New York, NY 10004, US
Built: 1909
Architect: Walker and Morris
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: Beaux-Arts terminal originally accommodated ferry service to 39th Street in Brooklyn. Slips 6 and 7 ferry visitors to and from Governors Island and Slip 5 is planned for East River commuter service. The facade underwent a $60 million restoration. Plans for the building include a specialty foods marketplace in the building's Great Hall, and a new addition on the west side to house a 135-room boutique hotel and indoor/outdoor roof-top restaurant.
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U.S. Maritime Service Enrolling Office
45 Broadway
Manhattan
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John Willis Griffiths House
130 Ainslie St
Brooklyn
Final residence for New York naval architect John Willis Griffiths, b. 6 Oct 1809 (Manhattan, New York), d. 30 March 1882 (Brooklyn, New York). Griffiths built the Rainbow (1845), the first true clipper ship, which radically changed the China and California trade.

His final resting place is the Linden Hill Methodist Cemetery, 332 Woodward Ave, Ridgewood, Queens NY 11385, Section B lot 113

SOURCE: Dr. Larrie D. Ferreiro, author Ships and Science: The Birth of Naval Architecture in the Scientific Revolution, 1600-1800 Cambridge: MIT Press, 2007
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NY Naval Militia Armory
150-74 6th Ave
Whitestone, Queens
The only active, federally-recognized Naval Militia with continuous, unbroken service to the Country and State for more than a century and a history stretching back to the Revolution, housed in the former club house of the Whitestone Yacht Club.

"The New York Naval Militia's heritage spans over two centuries, dating back to the American Revolution. The first naval battle of the Revolutionary War was fought on Lake Champlain in 1776 by New York Militiamen manning the ships of a small American squadron." SOURCE www.dmna.state.ny.us


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Brooklyn Army Terminal (BAT)
U.S. Army Military Ocean Terminal
140 58th Street and 1st Ave
Brooklyn
Built: 1918
Architect: Cass Gilbert
Built by: Turner Construction Co.
Designation: State & National Register

Description: The US Army's main port of embarkation in New York City shipping army equipment and personnel overseas. It was renamed Brooklyn Army Terminal in 1955 and was closed in 1961. The 91-acre area is a large complex of piers, docks, warehouses, and railroad tracks that now serves as an industrial park and bioscience center. The lobby has an exhibit of Elvis Presley shipping out to Germany from BAT in 1958.

(SOURCE: NYS Division of Military & Naval Affairs: Military History; Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record )
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Rockaway Naval Air Station
Jacob Riis Park
Rockaway Penninsula, Queens
One of the US Navy's original Naval Air Stations. Operational from 1917 to 1930 with a maximum occupancy of 1,285. Once contained over 80 buildings on a 96 acre site. By 1930, 42 of 51 remaining structures were demolished. About 1931 started conversion to Jacob Riis Park. Completion of the park removed all traces of the air base. Starting point for first airplane to fly the Atlantic in 1919. (SOURCE: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us)
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US Coast Guard Station
Rockaway Point Blvd.
Rockaway, Queens
USCG closed Station Rockaway and transfered ownership of the property to the National Park Service, Jamaica Bay Unit.
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Naval Armed Guard Center
52nd St & 1st Ave
Brooklyn
Naval Armed Guards defended unarmed merchant vessel against attacks by German aircraft and U-boats in the North Sea.

"When the USS BROOKLYN was scrapped in 1921, the mainmast and the foremast were saved and were
installed at the New York State Naval Militia Armory located at 52nd St. & 1st Ave., Brooklyn, NY. They
were installed at either end of the armory's drill deck which a huge domed ceiling." from www.navalbasehobbies.com
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LIRR Gantry Marine-Rail
474 48th Ave
Long Island City, Queens
State Park
Gantry cranes used from the middle 19th to middle 20th century to load and unload rail car floats and barges. (SOURCE: Wikipedia)
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Sperry Gyroscope Co. Inc.
Manhattan Bridge Plaza
Brooklyn
Founded in 1910 by Elmer Sperry the company developed the gyrocompass.In 1911, Elmer Sperry worked closely with Admiral David Taylor of the United States Navy in order to perfect his gyrocompass. The first gyrocompass was installed on the battleship Delaware and by 1915 it had become standard equipment on all navy ships. In 1913 the first gyrostabilizer was installed on the USS Worden. Sperry was one of the nation's most important defense contractors during two world wars.
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U.S. Maritime Service Training School
Kingsborough Community College
2001 Oriental Blvd
Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn
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Pier 53, FDNY Marine Co. 3
Ganesvoort Peninsula
Ft Bloomfield St
Manhattan
Fireboat House
Fireboat JOHN D. MCKEAN built in 1958.

FDNY Marine units were established in 1875 to respond to shipboard fires, suppressing waterfront fires, and lending support to shore-based firefighters by pumping water directly out of the harbor.
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69th Street RR float Bridge
Riverside Park South
North River, Manhattan
Built: 1911
Engineer: James B. French

Description: New York Central Railroad Float Bridge No. 4 has a pair of hinged bridge decks suspended by cables from a barn like overhead housing. Motors inside that housing lifted and lowered the decks to align them with the floats, whose position depended on the tides and the loads they carried. (SOURCE: New York Times)
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Atlantic Basin
1 Hamilton Avenue
Brooklyn
Cruise Terminal, Containerport
Built: 1847
Built by: Atlantic Dock Company

Description: The port facility was developed by James T. Stranahan, known as the "Father of Brooklyn" who arrived in Brooklyn in 1845 at the age of 37. The waterfront development did not pay a dividend until 1870. Stranahan went on to bring about the development of Prospect Park and the Brooklyn Bridge. A statue of Stranahan stands today at Grand Army Plaza.

Source: Red Hook Gowanus Neighborhood History Guide, BHS; The New York Times, December 14, 1888
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Erie Basin
Erie Basin Bargeport
ft. Columbia Street
Brooklyn
The largest private marine facility in the Northeast. Erie Basin is a deep water protected harbor developed in the 1850s. Brooklyn's largest dredging and breakwater project, it served as the terminus for the 524 miles canals connecting the Hudson River, Lakes Erie and Champlain, and other points.

Erie Basin Bargeport is a joint venture between Reinauer Transportation & Hughes Maritime containing 30 acres of land and 56 acres of underwater property.
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St. John's Freight House
Clarkson St at Washington St.
Manhattan
Built: 1934

Description: St. John's Park Freight Terminal, with tracks at second floor, permits public loading and unloading to be done entirely under cover. The Terminal covers three city blocks and eventually will be extended one block to the south and nine additional stories will be built above its present three stories. These additions will make it the largest commercial structure in New York City.

The Terminal is served by 14 freight elevators and is designed to facilitate the speedy and economical handling of freight. The first floor of the Terminal is recessed so that 150 trucks may load or discharge at one time under cover and within the building line. (SOURCE: Railroad.net)
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New York Terminal Warehouse
W 27th St
Manhattan
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B&O Railroad Warehouse
W 26th St
Manhattan
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Starrett-Lehigh Building
601 W 26th St
Manhattan
Warehouses
Current Use: Media Co. Offices
Historic Use: Factory Warehouses
Built: 1931
Architect: Russell G. Cory, Walter M. Cory & Yasuo Matsui
Designation: Landmark

Description: Built by financier William A. Starrett on land he leased from the Lehigh Valley Railroad. The ground floor was a freight yard. Tracks lead directly from the piers into the building, freight cars served by car floats docking at Pier 66 across 12th Avenue moved in 30-foot elevators to truck pits on upper floors. Each floor is still equipped with passenger, freight, and truck elevators.
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Piers 1—12, Brooklyn-Port Authority Marine Terminal
Brooklyn Bridge Park
Brooklyn
Piers 1-6 Brooklyn Bridge Park
Pier 7-11 Red Hook Container Terminal
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South Brooklyn Marine Terminal
29th - 39th Street
Brooklyn
An 88-acre marine terminal located between 29th and 39th streets in Brooklyn, just south of Erie Basin. The SBMT is owned by the Port Authority and managed by EDC.
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Bush Terminal
Between 2nd & 3rd Ave, 39th to 50th St
Brooklyn
Warehouses
Built: 1902-1909
Built by: Irving T. Bush
Designation: Eligible for state and National Register

Description: Called "a city within a city," Bush Terminal was the first American example of completely integrated manufacturing and warehousing facilities encompassing its own railroad, power plant and fire department that grew to 250 acres, with 21 miles of railroad track. Purchased by Helmsley-Spear in 1965, the property converted to an industrial park. (SOURCE: Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record, Library of Congress)
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New York Dock Co. Warehouses
160-162 Imlay Street
Brooklyn
Warehouses
Built: 1910

Description: Twin six-story one-block-long former warehouses were part of the New York Dock Company's huge freight handling complex that extended for two and one-half miles on the waterfront. The Port Authority took over property in 1955 and it was leased to Maersk in 1958. Today the structures deteriorate while developers litigate their future.

"The first warehouse and pier system in the western hemisphere was begun in 1850 b ythe New York Dock Company. The enterprise now includes 34 piers, 159 storage warehouses, with a total capacity of 65,435,000 cubic feet; 20 manufacturing buildings ...and a cold storage plant. Its activities are divided into three terminals, the Fulton, the Baltic, and the Atlantic Basin."(The Port of New York by Thomas Edward Rush, 1920)
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Beard Street Warehouses
Beard Street
Red Hook, Brooklyn
Warehouses
Built: 1869
Built by: William Beard

Description: 21 small warehouses on 7.5 acres currently occupied by small industrial businesses, including a glass works.
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Pier 41
204-207 Van Dyke St.
Red Hook, Brooklyn
Warehouses
Current Use: Industrial complex
Historic Use: Dry Goods Storehouse
Built: 1860s
Built by: William Beard

Description: The Civil War-era brick storehouse is occupied by craftsmen and cabinetmakers.
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Red Hook Stores
Fairway
480-500 Van Brunt Street
Red Hook , Brooklyn
Warehouses
Built: 1860s
Built by: William Beard
Historic Name: Van Brunt Stores, New York Warehouse Co.’s Stores

Description: Five-story brick warehouse adapted for reuse as a Fairway supermarket and luxury loft apartments.

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Empire Stores
Empire-Filton Ferry State Park
Water Street
Brooklyn
Warehouses
Built:

Description: The four-story Empire Stores stockpiled coffee in the 19th century when dry goods warehouses formed a wall on the East River. Part of the structure is currently used for State Park's offices.
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Tobacco Warehouse
Empire-Fulton Ferry State Park
26 New Dock St
East River, Brooklyn
Warehouses
Built: 1870s
Designation: Landmark

Description: Civil War-era tobacco inspection warehouse built by the Lorillard family.
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Bush Building
130 W 42nd St
Manhattan
Shipping Trade Offices
Built: 1917
Architect: Helmle & Corbett

Description: The tall, narrow Bush Terminal International Exhibit Building was conceived by Irving T. Bush as office space for importers who operated at Bush Terminal in Brooklyn.
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Coast Guard Air Station
Floyd Bennett Field
Gateway National Recreation Area
Brooklyn
Operational: 1938-1998

Description: One of the Coast Guard's first ten air stations and the city's first municipal airport.

Rotary wing aviation within the Coast Guard was born at Brooklyn, when LCDR Frank Erickson, USCG, and Igor Sikorsky designed and developed the Sikorsky XR-4 helicopter. [Arthur Pearcy, A History of Coast Guard Aviation (Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 1989), p. 88.]
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Naval Air Reserve Base
Floyd Bennett Field
Gateway National Recreation Area
Brooklyn
Operational:

Description: One of eight Naval Reserve Bases,with the mission of providing flight training. Navy operations began at the field in 1931, which was designated Brooklyn Naval Air Station.
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Grain Elevator Terminal
685 Columbia Street
Brooklyn
Warehouses
Built: 1922
Built by: Office of the State Engineer
Designation: Eligible for State and National Register

Description: The 54-bin, 90-foot-tall reinforced concrete New York State Barge Canal Grain Elevator once stored Midwest grain shipped via the Erie Canal with capacity for two million bushels. The State turned over the silo to the Port Authority in 1944 and it continued to operate until 1965. The structure’s conveyors and loading pier were demolished in 1987. The 159-acre industrial complex around the grain elevator is used for salt storage and concrete production.
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Bowne Grain Storehouse
595-601 Smith Street
Brooklyn
Built: 1886

Description: Gabled 19th Century warehouse of S. W. Bowne for the storage of hay, straw, grain and feed barged on the Gownaus Canal.
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Cross Harbor Railroad
4302 1st Ave
Brooklyn
Marine-Rail
New York Dock Railway, Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal, Bush Terminal Railroad

Description: Last carfloat operation in New York City operates between Greenville Pier in Jersey City , NJ and Long Island, also has direct rail connection to the New York & Atlantic Railway Co.
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65th Street Float Bridge
ft. 65th Street
Brooklyn
Marine-Rail
Built: 1999

Description:

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U.S. Navy Fleet Supply Base
Storehouse No. 1, No. 2, Steam Plant
850 3rd Ave
Brooklyn
Built: 1918
Built by: US Navy, Bureau of Yards & Docks; Turner Construction Co.

Description: Originally constructed to supply the New York-based Third Fleet during WWI. The structures were managed by U.S. General Services Administration after 1960. Storehouse No. 1 was transformed in 1991 to accommodate the Federal Detention Center. It operated as a Clothing Supply Depot during WWII, employing about 2,000 garment workers to sew Navy uniforms.
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Coast Guard Support Center NY
Description: The large U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) facility, Support Center New York, consists of "a small, self-sufficient town, with several thousand people, a hotel, beauty salon, bowling alley, movie theater, nine-hole golf course and a Burger King".* The 172-acre island is surrounded by a seawall and is accessed by ferry from Manhattan. Coast Guard facilities on the island closed in 1995 and the USCG functions at were relocated to Fort Wadsworth on Staten Island.

Governors Island Coast Guard Memories

(* NY Times, February 4, 1995)

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New York Dock Co. Daylight Factory
One Brooklyn Bridge Park
360 Furman St
Brooklyn
Warehouses
Built: 1928
Architect: Russell G. Cory

Description: 12-story concrete "daylight factory" type warehouse with large windows built by the New York Dock Company for manufacturing has been owned by the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society for its printing facility since 1983. Recently converted to luxury condos.
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Navy Yard Transfer Bridge
63 Flushing Ave
Brooklyn
Marine-Rail
Built: 1942

Converted to a pontoon bridge in 1977.
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Fulton Ferry Landing
Built: 1814
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Fireboat House
Brooklyn Ice Cream Factory
2 Old Fulton Street
Brooklyn
Engine Co. 77, Marine Co. 7
Built: 1926
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: The structure closed in 1970 and currently houses an ice cream parlor.
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National Cold Storage Buildings
Brooklyn Bridge Park
66 Furman St
Brooklyn
Warehouses
Built: 1870s

Description: Originally the John T. Martin's Stores, converted to handle cold storage in 1915. At one time the largest cold storage in the New York area. The building is slated for demolition to make way for hotel in Brooklyn Bridge Park plan.
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Naval Homeport
Stapleton, Staten Island
The city first built municipal piers on the Stapleton waterfront in 1921. From 1937 to 1944 five enormous piers (Piers 12-16) served as the nation's first free trade zone, known as Foreign Trade Zone No. 1 - free from U. S. Customs inspection, embargoes, and import duties. During WWII both the U.S. Army and the U.S. Navy used the Stapleton waterfront as the New York State Port of Embarkation and designated for hospital ship docking. After the war, the waterfront fell into disrepair as the shipping industry declined. The Homeport, officially known as Naval Station New York (NAVSTANY), opened in 1989 at a cost of approximately $300 million and officially opened in 1989. The 36-acre waterfront base was closed in 1994. The property contains a 1,400 ft. pier and six buildings. PlanNYC calls for can investment of $66 million in infrastructure improvements and a mile long water front esplanade as part of the Stapleton Waterfront Development Plan.

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U.S. Maritime Sevice
Radio Training Station
Gateway National Recreation Area
Hoffman Island, Lower New York Bay
Operated: 1940 -
Current Use; Bird sanctuary

Description: Trained officers for the merchant fleet.
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NY Quarantine Depot
Gateway National Recreation Area
Hoffman Island, Staten Island
Immigrant Processing, Quarantine
Operated: 1872
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Ellis Island
Manhattan
Immigration Processing
Operated: 1892 - 1954
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Pier 4 RR Float Bridge
Brooklyn Bridge Park
Furman St
Brooklyn
Marine-Rail
Deteriorated
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New York Dock Co. Offices
Brooklyn Bridge Park
334 Furman Street
Brooklyn
Shipping Trade Offices
Current Use: Habitat for Humanity Offices
Historic Use: NY Dock Co. Offices
Built: 1917

Description: Planned demolition as part of park development.

Description:
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Piers 81 & 83, Hudson River Dayliner
Manhattan
Former Hudson River Day Line Piers are homeport to Circle Line and World Yacht excursion boats. The first Day Line began in 1863.
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Swinburne Quarantine Hospital
Swinburne Island

Immigrant Processing, Quarantine
The Quarantine hospital for immigrants arriving in America with contagious diseases was established on Swinburne Island to replace quarantine ships, which had operated since the Tompkinsville Quarantine Station was burnt down by Staten Island residents in 1858. The island was named for John S. Swinburne a Civil War Hero and surgeon who headed the development of the man-made island.
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Chelsea Fiber Mills
GREENPOINT MANUFACTURING & DESIGN CENTER (GMDC)
1155 Manhattan Ave
Greenpoint , Brooklyn
Maritime Industry
Current Use: Design & manufacturing center
Historic Use: Marine Rope Mill
Built: 1868
Designation: National Register

Description: Eight-building brick jute mill manufactured marine rope for rigging sails. George DuPont Pratt was trustee and treasurer to the company. The structure was abandoned by the 1970's. Adaptive reuse of the building began in 1988 when a group of small woodworking and cabinet-making firms moved in. In 1993 the tenants purchased the building from the city.
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American Manufacturing Company
Greenpoint Terminal Market
61 West St
Greenpoint, Brooklyn
Maritime Industry
Current Use: Abandoned
Historic Use: Rope Factory
Built: 1898
Architect: Angell & Higginson

Description: 16 building complex of AMC, at one time Brooklyn's second largest emploer and the largest rope manufacturer in the world. Much of the complex was still intact when destroyed by a fire in 2006.
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Capt. James W. Braisted House
26 Townsend Ave
Clifton, Staten Island
Built: 1886


Description: Queen Ann house built for ferry boat captain who later became Superintendent of the West Shore Railroad Ferry. According to the Preservation League of Staten island, Capt. Braisted accompanied Cornelius Vanderbilt on a round-the-world voyage in 1854.
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Seguine House
440 Seguine Ave
Staten Island
NYC Parks Historic House Trust
Built: 1840
Designation: NYC Landmark

Description: Greek Revival mansion built by oyster trader Joseph Seguine (1801-1856)
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Tompkinsville Quarantine
Wolfe's Pond Park
Staten Island
Quarantine
Established: 1799

Description: Burials of victims of contagious diseases continued at Wolfe's Pond until the 1890s
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Fire Control Tower
Palmer Dr at Beach 216th St
Breezy Point, Queens
Built: 1943

Description: Fire control tower, disguised as a lighthouse, for Battery Kessler and Battery Fergusson during WWII.
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FDNY Marine Co. 6
Brooklyn Navy Yard
Building 292
Brooklyn
Fireboat Station
KEVIN C. KANE fireboat purchased in 1992.

Established in 1875, the FDNY Marine Operations is the largest unit of its kind in the world.
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St. George Ferry Terminal
Ferries have been making the 5.2-mile trip from Lower Manhattan to Staten Island’s north shore dating as far back as 1650, with biweekly service beginning in 1745. The City of New York took over the operation in 1905. The current fleet is seven vessels and operates 24 hours per day. On a typical weekday, five boats make 104 trips carrying more than 65,000 passengers.
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Sandy Hook Pilots Pier
201 Edgewater Street
Staten Island
Established: 1694

Description: Pilots board incoming vessels at Ambrose Light to steer them through the sea lanes, shoals and reefs of New York Harbor. Dispatchers rotate calls among 65 pilots, who must apprentice for at least seven and a half years.
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FDNY Marine Co. 9
St. George Terminal, Slip 7
Staten Island
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Miller Launch
Pier 7 1/2
Ft. Hannah St
Staten Island
Marine Service Company
Established: 1977
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Witte Marine Salvage/DonJon
2453 Arthur Kill Rd
Staten Island
John Witte started buying boats for parts and scrap in 1931. He stored the vessels in the shallow water adjacent to the scrap yard while he salvaged parts. A graveyard of over 200 decaying ships are now scattered along the coast. Witte is today one of the largest scrap yards on the East Coast and one of the top scrap exporters in the nation.
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Garpo Marine
Tottenville, Staten Island
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Norwegian Seamen's Church
317 E 52nd St
Manhattan
Built: 1992

Description: Continues a long tradition of providing a home away from home for seamen and other travelers from Norway. It has now become a religious, social, and cultural center offering shows, exhibits, concerts, and a library of Nordic literature. (Source: tutrlebay-nyc.com)
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Conference House
Captain Christopher Billopp House
7455 Hylan Blvd
Staten Island, NY 10307, US
718-984-2086
Capt. Billop settled Ward's Point in 1677 after a distinguished career in the Royal Navy. He is credited with securing Staten Island for New York State by winning a wager to circumnavigate the island in one day.

The house is most famous as the site of the Pre-Revolutionary War Peace conference. On September 11, 1776, the Captain's decendent Colonel Christopher Billopp, a loyalist, hosted the meeting of Admiral Lord Howe with Benjamin Franklin, John Adams and Edward Rutledge.
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WWII Torpedo Factory
HS 439 Brooklyn International High School
49 Flatbush Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11217, US
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Lee, Higginson & Company
41 Broad St
New York, NY 10004, US
Built:
Historic Use: Bank trading floor
Present Use: Broad Street Ballroom

Description: "wraparound, 225-foot-long mural, “A Pageant of the History of Commerce by Sea.” Painted in 1929 by Griffith Baily Coale, it shows 36 generations of sailing ships, culminating in a panel titled “20th-Century Ships of the Sea and Air,” set at the foot of Lower Manhattan." NY Times, 1/17/08
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Rikers Island
Military training ground during the Civil War, first used by the Ninth New York Infantry, on the 440-acre island purchased by the city from the Riker family 1884. Today, the island houses one of the world's largest jail complexes.
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Gowanus Pumping Station & Flushing Tunnel
201 Douglas St.
Brooklyn, NY 11217
Opened: June 21, 1911

Description: At the head of Gowanus Canal, a 12-foot wide tunnel dug about a mile underground opens at Buttermilk Channel. A steampowered propeller circulating the polluted water in the canal with water in the channel helped to reduce some of the areas odor stemming from industrial waste and raw sewage in the waterway. This propeller broke in the 1960s and was not repaired until 1999. Each day the tunnel sucks 300 million gallons of water from Buttermilk Channel through the canal pushing polluted water into Gowanus Bay.

Source: Red Hook Gowanus Neighborhood History Guide, BHS; NYC DEP
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Brooklyn Improvement Company
3rd Ave & 3rd St
Brooklyn, NY 11215, US
Built:

Description: Edwin Litchfield, builder of the Gowanus Canal, founded BIC.
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Paulsen Wire Rope Corporation
4th Street
Between Hoyt & Bond St.
Brooklyn , NY
Built:

Description: Not sure if this is same as company of the same name in Sunbury, PA, which supplied It was to the Brooklyn Bridge rehabilitation.
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The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 5th Avenue, 83rd & 84th
Manhattan,
Art Deco gilded-glass mural “The History of Navigation” from the first class salon of the ocean liner Normandie, which sank in the Hudson River in 1942. The mural was donated to the MET in 1976 by collectors Irwin R. and Linda Berman. Designed by fashion illustrator Jean Dupas and manufactured by Charles Champigneulle in 1934, the 56 20-foot-high, 40-pound panels will be on display for the first time May thru October 2008. Prior to this time. only 24 murals were in view at the MET's restaurant.
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Up In The Old Hotel
South Street Seaport
NY, US
Journalist Joseph Mitchell, whose death in in May 1996 at the age of 87 merited a half-page obituary in the New York Times, pioneered a style of journalism while crafting brilliant magazine pieces for the New Yorker from the 1930s to the early 1960s. Up in the Old Hotel, a collection of his best reporting, is a 700-page joy to read.
Mitchell lovingly chronicled the lives of odd New York characters. In the pages of Up In the Old Hotel, the reader passes through places such as McSorley's Old Ale House or the Fulton Fish Market that many observers might have found ordinary. But when experienced through Mitchell's gifted eye, the reader will see that these haunts of old New York possess poetry, beauty, and meaning. (Source: Amazon)
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The Great Bridge

David McCullough
First published in 1972, The Great Bridge is the classic account of one of the greatest engineering feats of all time. Winning acclaim for its comprehensive look at the building of the Brooklyn Bridge, this book helped cement David McCullough's reputation as America's preeminent social historian. Now, The Great Bridge is reissued as a Simon & Schuster Classic Edition with a new introduction by the author.
This monumental book brings back for American readers the heroic vision of the America we once had. It is the enthralling story of one of the greatest events in our nation's history during the Age of Optimism -- a period when Americans were convinced in their hearts that all great things were possible. In the years around 1870, when the project was first undertaken, the concept of building a great bridge to span the East River between the great cities of Manhattan and Brooklyn required a vision and determination comparable to that which went into the building of the pyramids. Throughout the fourteen years of its construction, the odds against the successful completion of the bridge seemed staggering. Bodies were crushed and broken, lives lost, political empires fell, and surges of public emotion constantly threatened the project. But this is not merely the saga of an engineering miracle: it is a sweeping narrative of the social climate of the time and of the heroes and rascals who had a hand in either constructing or obstructing the great enterprise. Amid the flood of praise for the book when it was originally published, Newsday said succinctly "This is the definitive book on the event. Do not wait for a better try: there won't be any.
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Leaves of Grass

Walt Whitman
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Of Time and The River
A Legend of Man's Hunger in His Youth

Thomas Wolfe
About fifteen years ago, at the end of the second decade of this century, four people were standing together on the platform of the railway station of a town in the hills of western Catawba. This little station, really just a suburban adjunct of the larger town which, behind the concealing barrier of a rising ground, swept away a mile or two to the west and north, had become in recent years the popular point of arrival and departure for travellers to and from the cities of the east, and now, in fact, accommodated a much larger traffic than did the central station of the town, which was situated two miles westward around the powerful bend of the rails. For this reason a considerable number of people were now assembled here, and from their words and gestures, a quietly suppressed excitement that somehow seemed to infuse the drowsy mid-October afternoon with an electric vitality, it was possible to feel the thrill and menace of the coming train.



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Robert Fulton Grave
Trinity Church
89 Broadway
New York, NY
Robert Fulton, inventor of the steam engine, is laid to rest in the small cemetery in the yard of Trinity Church.
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Moby Dick
Former site of Harper Brothers, publisher of of Melville's "Moby Dick". The original stereotype plates of the book were lost in a fire here.
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Herman Melville Grave
Woodlawn Cemetery
501 E 233rd St
Bronx, NY, United States
Birth: Aug. 1, 1819
Death: Sep. 28, 1891
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Cornelius Vanderbilt Grave
Moravian Cemetery
2205 Richmond Ave
Staten Island, NY
Birth: May 27, 1794
Death: Jan. 4, 1877
19th Century American shipping and railroad tycoon.
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Gertrude Ederle Grave
Woodlawn Cemetery
Birth: Oct. 23, 1905
Death: Nov. 30, 2003

The first woman to swim the English Channel.
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Birthplace of Herman Melville
6 Pearl St
New York, NY 10004
A plaque and mask of the author of MOBY DICK is on the wall of the high-rise where the original home once stood.
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NYC Marble Cemetery
72 E 1st St
New York, NY, United States
Francis Frickett shipbuilder of the SAVANNAH, built at Corlear's Hook on the East River in 1818. She is the first steamship to cross the Atlantic departing New York May 22, 1819 and arriving in Liverpool June 20, 1819 under Capt. Moses Rogers.

Stephen Smith, of Smith & Dimon shipbuilders located on Corlear's Hook, builder of the SEA WITCH (92 ft length, 43-foot beam, 908 tons)credited with being one of the first American "clipper ships." Under Capt. Waterman she made a record-setting run from Hong Kong to New York in 77 days. She lowered this record to 74 days in 1849. This mark is one of the oldest human speed records still standing, having not been bettered by any sailing vessel. The shipyard built the Clipp ship RAINBOW in 1845.


Adam & Noah Brown shipbuilders. The brothers set up a shipyards at Lake Erie, and Adam at Lake Champlain in the War of 1812, building the NIAGARA and LAWRENCE. In 1815 they had a hand in the building of Fulton Steam Frigate.
built the SARATOGA

John Ericson designer of the ironclad MONITOR

Preserved Fish was a whaling captain out of New Bedford, Mass., before moving to New York City in the early 1800's. With his cousin Joseph Grinnell, he sold whale oil, acquired ships and organized the shipping company Fish & Grinnell running packet lines to Liverpool and London.


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Greenpoint Reformed Church
138 Milton St
Brooklyn, NY
"Two white porcelain plaques depict a seated figure of Robert Fulton, with designs for paddle-wheel steamboats, submarines and torpedoes and the gentleman standing is the politician Robert Livingston, Fulton’s business partner. The plaques were probably made in the late 1870s at the Union Porcelain Works, a factory in Greenpoint that was in operation from the 1860s to the 1920s." NY Times
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Giovanni da Verrazzano Statue
Battery Park
20 State St
New York, NY
The bronze bust Verrazzano (c. 1485-1528) sculpted by Ettore Ximenes for the Hudson-Fulton Celebration of 1909.
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Morgan Library
29 E 36th St
New York, NY
Houses a copy of the Cellere Codes, Giovanni da Verrazzano's report on his travels to the New World, which was later used by navigator Henry Hudson.
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Annie Moore
Calvary Cemetery
4902 Laurel Hill Blvd
Flushing, NY
The first immigrant through Ellis Island on January 1, 1892. The grave was unmarked since her death in 1924. It was located in 2008 and a Celtic Cross now marks the grave.

Her passage across the Atlantic at age 15 from County Cork to New York Harbor is commemorated with bronze statues at Ellis Island
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Statue of Annie Moore
Ellis Island
New York , NY
Statue of Annie Moore erected at Ellis Island, and at her Irish departure point, Cobh, in County Cork commemorating the 15 year olds status as the first immigrant to arrive through Ellis Island on January 1, 1892.
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Site of St. Mark's
325 E 6th St
New York, NY 10003
Commemorative plaque honoring the victims and families of the city's worst sea disaster, the General Slocum catastrophe. This was the location of the church.
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Robert Angus Sweeney
Calvary Cemetery
4902 Laurel Hill Blvd
Flushing, NY, United States
African American US Navy sailor and double Medal of Honor winner.
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American Dock Company
Bay St
Staten Island, NY, US
American Dock consisted of Piers 1-5 constructed by Alfred Pouch in 1872. The old warehouses on the site have been repuposed as present-day Bay Street Landing condos.
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Seafarer's International Union
635 4th Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11232, US
(718) 499-6600
The SIU represents mariners and boatmen who sail aboard U.S.-flagged vessels in deep sea, the Great Lakes, and inland waterways.
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DeWitt Clinton (1769-1828)
500 25th Street
Brooklyn, NY, United States
"Father of the Erie Canal"

Mayor of New York City, N.Y., 1803-07, 1808-10, 1811-15
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William Russell Grace
Holy Cross Cemetery
3620 Tilden Avenue
Brooklyn, NY, United States
Establsihed steamship line in U.S. in 1860, Grace Line (W.R. Grace & Co.) In 1885, Grace accepted the Statue of Liberty from France on behalf of the people of United States.
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N Y Nautical Instrument Services
158 Duane Street
New York, NY, United States
One of the oldest nautical supply stores in America.
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William Henry Webb
Woodlawn Cemetery
New York shipbuilder & naval architect