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Modern Phoenix Neighborhoods

Map of all known neighborhoods and buildings of Modern Phoenix from the midcentury modern era. Created from Modern Phoenix staff research in addition to the research of Don Ryden, City of Phoenix, Donna Reiner and the Guide to the Architecture of Metro Phoenix by the AIA. Out of respect for homeowners, individual homes are typically not listed but densely-modern neighborhoods are. Visit www.modernphoenix.net for more information on our city.
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Canal North / Hixson Homes
The first ever Ralph Haver neighborhood, circa 1945/46. Three homes confirmed, many others unconfirmed but suspected. Home to Ralph Haver's first family residence. From humble beginnings a virtual architectural empire grew.

This neighborhood barely made the 2008 Top Ten map, surprisingly beating out more established neighborhods Paradise Gardens, Starlite Vista, Tonka Vista and Star of Paradise. Strong value, investment potential and its upward mobility as a transitional neighborhood all added up!
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Marlen Grove
Marlen Grove homes were designed by Ralph Haver and built in 1952. This neighborhood was the site of our annual home tour in 2007. These homes are widely coveted for their flexible designs and creative design-conscious neighbors.

Winner 2008 Most Beautiful Neighborhood
Winer 2008 Most Desirable Neighborhood
Runner-up 2008 Best Investment

Our readers say:


"Superb mid-century modern for the Haver design, and best manifest modernism in Phoenix."

Our readers say:
"The ONLY place to live"

"Everyone in the neighborhood is on first name basis with each other. I spend more time with neighbors on a weekly basis then I do at work."

"The residents have an uncommon comraderie and care deeply about their homes."
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Tonka Vista
This neighborhood is reported to have been inhabited by many architects and engineers in the mid-1950s, including Ralph Haver and Del Webb.
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Marion Estates
This neighborhood features many custom modern elevation homes, and a few Ralph Haver and Al Beadle designs. The neighborhood is primely situated between Scottsdale, Paradise Valley and Phoenix.

Our readers say:
"Great for the diversity of significant MCM architects represented, the true and raw desert setting and the relatively original condition of the overall subdivision."
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Windemere
Windemere homes were designed by Ralph Haver and were built in the late 50s. Windemere was the site of the first Modern Phoenix home tour in 2005. The homes are distinguished by their floor to ceiling front-facing windows and large chimney volumes.

Runner-up 2008 Most Desirable Neighborhood
Runner-up 2008 Most Beautiful Neighborhood

Our readers say:
"For its location: It is the only Haver neighborhood in Arcadia."

"Windemere, hands down. Everything is perfect. New/old. Renovated/original. Uniformity/variety. A true glimpse into MoCo then and now. Plus, the Danleys' house never hurts!"


"Superb mid-century modern for the Haver design, and best manifest modernism in Phoenix."
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Rancho Ventura / Town and Country
This Ralph Haver neighborhood was built in 1957 and is situated well between Phoenix and South Scottsdale. It has an active neighborhood association and is a favorite up and comer for prospective homeowners seeking unaltered Haver homes. Some homes also features the rare "clinker brick" style wainscoting detail.

Winner 2008 Best Value
Runner-up 2008 Rising Star

Our readers say:
"A hidden little enclave of up and coming Havers not to mention the very very affordable prices and amazing neighbors."

"There is a renaissance underfoot in this centrally located neighborhood, making this little HaverHood a diamond in the rough. Over the last five years it has attracted about a dozen creative, entrepreneurial types who love mid-century design and are doing some note-worthy renovations. This core group have organized themselves to sponsor an annual home tour and other social activities that benefit neigborhood improvements. They recently formed HIVE, a loosely arranged business consortium consisting of real neighbors with talents in real estate, design, finance and marketing communications to cross promote each other. Find our what the buzz is all about and check out Rancho Ventura."
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Hy-View
Hy-View homes were built in 19__ and feature low sloped rooflines and large lots. Only a small percentage of homes in this area are truly modern elevations, but the rest are classic ranches and are well-kept. Though the architect is yet unconfirmed, the homes still look great and are a good investment for someone needing to be in South Scottsdale near Tempe.
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Three Fountains by Al Beadle
4411 N 40th St
Phoenix, AZ 85018, US
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Architect's Row
Harold Ekman, Ralph Haver, Ed Varney, Weaver & Drover, and Fred Guirey all housed their architecture firms on the south side of Camelback in the mid-50s. Al Beadle designed one of his first commercial buildings just a few doors down. See 111, 201 506 and 341 E. Camelback, plus the building across the street (yeah, the Castle Boutique). Though the Haver / Weaver&Drover / Varney offices at 128, 221 and 207 have been replaced with an unremarkable Auto Zone building and perhaps See's Candies, one one of Haver's rare two-story designs has since been rehabilitated by Red Modern Furniture -- as must-stop for any visitor to Phoenix. The Schreiber Brothers office building is just up the street on Central as well.
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North Park Central
These modest ranches range from traditional style to slightly modern, but have the huge advantage of being situated closer to downtown than most modern neighborhoods. A good value.
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Park Central Mall area
These charming ranch homes feature great variety of styles in one compact area, and great location.
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Campus Vista
Primarily red brick homes and ranches, Campus Vista has a great view of the Phoenix College campus that Ralph Haver designed. At least one known Haver home is in this neighborhood. See if you can find it!

Our readers say:
"Centrally located, up and coming, great values, diverse eclectic neighbhors, close to transportation (light rail)."
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Sunview Estates
HUGE lots, curving streets and sprawling modern ranches characterize this gorgeous neighborhood with good variety of modern styles to choose from.
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Hoffmantown
Primarily red brick homes are designed is a conservative but charming style. Not exactly modern, but certainly classically postwar. Close proximity to the light rail is a big bonus.
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Brannandale
Brannandale is micro-modern on a super budget. Not yet really developed by the neo-modernists yet, it is a good value for the location and a great starter size.
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Starlite Vista
These Ralph Haver residences were built in 1954ish and feature all the same floorplan, only flipped and re-oriented on the lot to create a uniform but diverse streetscape across three short drives.

Our readers say:
"Most of the Havers are in original form and the neighborhood is beautiful."

A hidden gem. Many owners are starting to renovate. Affordable and still has original, unrenovated Havers."
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Royal Palm
Royal Palm is a large, sprawling subdivision characterized by large lots, large flooplans, and palm-lined streets. Not every home has a modern elevation, but those that do are really cute. Some include dramatic swiss-style sloping roofline features that almost reach the ground.
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Newcastle
We're not really sure what's going on here, only that there are some interesting early-70s modern elevations. Great west-side value!
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Sunset North
We're not really sure what's going on here, only that there are some interesting early-70s modern elevations. Great west-side value!
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Moon Valley Gardens West
Dotted with some modern elevations among classic ranches.
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Village Meadows
Featuring some modern elevations designed by Charles Schreiber, this neighborhood is a sister to Village Grove in South Scottsdale. Sprawling, low-sloped rooflines and plenty of windows characterize this design.

Our readers say:
" Home values for first time buyers or apartment dweller trade-ups are great. An Alied-built home mirroring those in the Village Grove Historic District can be puchased for under $250K! Infrastructure in the area is constantly improving. Commuting is easy with access to I-17 and the 101. The best feature is, of course, the over 400 Allieds, including 30+ Modern elevations. Anderson and Greenbriar are especially nice streets. Many original neighbors still occupy these houses and keep them looking like they did in the 60s!"
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Chateau Thierry
Lots of sprawling and original modern ranches situated among the foothills of the Shadow Mountain Preserve create a refuge from the city. Some horse properties remain.
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The Big S Mountain
No drive through Sunnyslope is complete without skirting the edge of S Mountain. Keep your eyes open for older ranches to the east, and more contemporary works as you work your way west.
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Cactus Heights
Rumor has it that the reason why these homes are so eclectic is that they were all relocated during the building of Piestewa Freeway. ? ? ?
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Northwest Sunnyslope
Keep your eyes peeled for the two-story Xeros residence. You really can't miss it.
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East Sunnyslope
Dotted with charming modest modern ranches (and even a rare A-frame!), East Sunnyslope is a true mountain refuge from the city. Keep your eyes peeled for the Burnette Studio and Residence, a two-story CMU structure that is hidden behind dense desert foliage on the hill.
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East Sunnyslope
More mountain moderns in the foothills of the Phoenix Mountains Preserve. Keep your eyes peeled for the dark, boxlike Dialogue House by Wendel Burnette on the southern slope.
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East Sunnyslope
Excellent, clean modern ranches with easy access to the Mountain Preserve. The 12th Street Corridor is chock full of modest modern homes ready to fix up.

Winner 2008 Best Investment
Winner 2008 Rising Star
Runner-up 2008 Best Value

Our readers say:
"Unlimited Potential!"

"In this neighborhood you have almost every style of MCM covered...butterfly roof lines, Haveresque homes, boxes, ranches, contemporary new builds, many well known architects have built homes in Sunnyslope. The neighborhood has a significant amount of history behind it, both bad and good, ask almost anyone in Arizona and they know about Sunnyslope, it's not just known for being a MCM neighborhood."
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Paradise Gardens
Though Al Beadle would probably roll in his grave to hear it, his legacy is still associated with preliminary designs he created for the only known subdivision he was ever involved in. These boxy modern homes feature four elevations/floorplans, and were the subject of the Modern Phoenix home tour in 2006. Many neo-modern renovations have happened here in recent years, making it one of the most desirable neighborhoods for Modern Phoenicians seeding to live up north.
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Town and Country Paradise
These Ralph Haver homes were built in 19__ and are the furthest north Haverhood ever confirmed. They feature the same floorplans as the historic neighborhood Town and Country in Scottsdale.
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Cavalier Estates
Large sprawling ranches with grand entryways are one of North Phoenix's best kept secrets.
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Star of Paradise
Cute modern elevations, curvy streets and an affordable price make this neighborhood a Modern Phoenix favorite.
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Hallcraft Homes
Your everyday Ranchburger, circa late 60s. Lots and lots and lots of 'em.
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Hallcraft Homes
Your everyday Ranchburger, circa late 60s. Lots and lots and lots of 'em.
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Town & Country Scottsdale
This Ralph Neighborhood was built in the late 50s and is the first modern designed neighborhood ever to be designated historic by any city in the Valley of the Sun. Clinker brick treatments in the wainscoting of some elevations, as well as an open grid form above the entrance patio are two defining characteristics.

Our readers say:
"superb mid-century modern for the Haver design, and best manifest modernism in Phoenix."
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Village Grove
This subdivision of large ranch homes features "modern elevation" designs by architect Charles Schreiber in the early 60s. Large, sloping rooflines supported by angled carport posts are common characteristics. This neighborhood was host to Modern Phoenix home tour 2008 in April.

Our readers say:
"A true modern neighborhood, by definition. Although all the homes do not incorporate what we think of today as 'modern lines', the concept behind the entire development was very modern at the time."

"The Modern homes in Village Grove are some of the most unique modern tract home designs in the Valley. They have flown under the radar for many years but now that the architect responsible for the designs has been made public and with the press Village Grove has received their significance can not be ignored. In addition, the limited supply of modern Allieds makes them extremely desirable and in high demand. Allied Modern homes are probably the most difficult of the modern homes to acquire. The area is spotless and the community is perfect."
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Trail West
This tiny subdivision features a few modern elevation homes.
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Hotel Valley Ho
Designed by Ed Varney in 1956, this gorgous midcentury style hotel exemplifies the glory days of Scottsdale as a resort town. Recently rehabilitated in 2004, it stands as one of the west's best examples of luxurious MCM design.
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Garden Apartments
The area in the Shadow of the Valley Ho is dotted with darling garden apartments, most of which have been converted into condos.
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Garden Apartments
The area in the Shadow of the Valley Ho is dotted with darling garden apartments, most of which have been converted into condos.
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Multifamily Mysteries near Paiute Park
These low-sloped multifamily residences have probably seen better days.
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Broadmor
These midcentury modern homes are distinguished by their broad, low-sloping rooflines and ample clerestory windows. Detailed and slightly recessed entryways also create relief agains the otherwise flat front of the building.
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Cavalier Campus
Recessed entryways beneath wide, low gables characterize these homes. These models look suspiciously similar to Cavalier Estates in North Phoenix, and given the name, there is likely a connection.
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Papago Gardens
A good variety of styles are avaiable here, probably late 60s or early 70s?
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Campus Homes
Built in 1953 and designed by Ralph Haver, Campus Homes are the first example of tract homes built in Tempe. They are distinguished largely by the nine-pane window design out front, though not all homes feature this detail. Similar designs are used in Scottsdale's Camelback Park Estates. Their active neighborhod association will apply for historic designation.
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Camelback Park Estates
These Ralph Haver homes were built in 19__ and feature the same 9-pane window detail as the homes in Campus Homes, Tempe. Due to the rate of development in this area, these homes are greatly endangered and the fabric of the neighborhood is threatened by many radical remodels not in the modern spirit.
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Mayfair Manor
Mayfair Manor is a small Ralph Haver neighborhood at risk. One two-story home and a new knockdown. Homes feature similar but not identical elevations to Camelback Park Estates and Campus Homes.

Our readers say:
"Centrally located and the houses mingle well."

"
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Multifamily living on Maryland
There are several retro-era multifamily apartment complexes along Maryland between 7th Avenue and 12th Street. Most notable is the Olympus (formerly the Monarch) at Central and Maryland by Chopas and Starkovitch
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Janet Manor
Several Haver homes off the 12th-13th Street and Rose Lane area, including some clinker brick facades. Looks like another Town & Country style subdivision, only without clear boundaries. One of the city's best kept secrets.
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Maryvale Terrace
We don't really know what's going on here, but it looks pretty affordable modern for the masses! Probably a John F. Long development. More research needed.
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Rancho del Monte
Interesting stuff going aroundhere, including a tiny Ralph Haver rehab.
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Beadle Building and Beadleview
Al Beadle's Mountain Bell Building, all steel and glass, fell before our very eyes to be replaced by a modern hirise retirement community. The developer foreclosed on the property and the pile of rubble shamefully remains in violation of their agreement.
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Mountain Bell Building by Al Beadle
Demolished 2009
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12th Street Office Building by Beadle
This bermed structure features bold diagonal glass stripes and protects an inner garden courtyard.
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Valley National Bank, Herman Jacoby
1957. A valley National Bank designed by Herman Jacoby of Weaver and Drover. Now beautifully rehabbed and inhabited by Hoskin Ryan Consultants.
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Modern Multifamily Complexes
Lots of interesting multifamily apartments and condos along 20th north of Camelback.
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Biltmore Fashion Park
One of the grande olde outdoor midcentury era shopping malls of Phoenix. Not the same since Westcor attempted to improve it, but original details remain.
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Arizona Biltmore Resort
One of the most luxurious hotels in America, this resort opened in 1929 and was designed by Albert Chase McArthur. Often mistakenly credited to Frank Lloyd Wright, Wright was only involved in the consultation on the Textile Block patterns seen throughout the site.
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Northwood
Northwood is a small Ralph Haver neighborhood built in 1953/54. Conveniently located on the "12th Street Corridor" near other Ralph Haver designed projects and in the Madison school district.

Our readers say:
"There are currently five major remodels in progress on the street...these Ralph Haver homes have 10,000 square ft lots and Madison schools. Once can still find a bargain as there are many homes waiting to be lovingly transformed."
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Unknown Haver Homes
This (unconfirmed) Ralph Haver neighborhood shares qualities with Campus Homes in Tempe, having several 9-pane window elevations along the south side of Osborn Road.
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Phoenix Financial Center / Punchcard building
The Punchcard Building was designed by WA Sarmiento in 1968 and stands as an excellent example of large-scale midcentury modern architecture in Phoenix.
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Phoenix Municipal Building and City Council Chambers
Designed by Ed Varney and Associates + Ralph Haver and Associates in 1963.
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Phoenix College
Many buildings designed and remodeled by Ralph Haver and Jimmie Nunn's firm in the mid 60s.
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Veteran's Memorial Coliseum
1964. w/ T.Y. Lin international
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Executive Towers
This midrise residential building was built in 1960 by Dailey/Beadle.
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Lou Regesters Furniture / Copenhagen Imports
1701 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ
Designed in 1954 by Ralph Haver -- one of many furniture store designs he completed in the Valley. This particular showroom has the look and feel of a classic Haver Home on steroids, with everything just a little bit larger, a little bit MORE.
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Paradise Valley United Methodist Church
Designed in 1967 by Haver, Nunn and Jensen.
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Wigwam Resort
300 E Wigwam Blvd
Litchfield Park, AZ 85340, US
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Ralph Haver Office Building
1133 E Missouri Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85014, US
Now home to the Phoenix Boys' Choir, this unremarkable two-story building once served as the offices for Ralph Haver and Associates in 1962-1963. Its most unusual feature is the twisted columns that were reclaimed from a project that had been demoed, and Ralph, in classically cheap fashion, re-used them here.
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Cosanti
6433 E Doubletree Ranch Rd
Paradise Valley, AZ 85253, US
The Paradise Valley home and studio of architect Paolo Soleri. A must-see for any visitor to Phoenix interested in Modernism. Tours are self-guided and free. Bring some spending money to purchase one of the Cosanti Foundation's famous bells. An extra half-day trip up to Soleri's Arcosanti is also well worth the detour: look for our marker up Interstate 17 north of Phoenix.
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Arcosanti
Paolo Soleri's urban laboratory, started in the early 1970s and still chugging along. Featuring huge cast concrete passive solar apses, impressive bellcasting studios, a performing arts center, and mutifamily housing all in the gorgeous setting of Arizona's high desert. A must-see for any visitor to Phoenix and only a half-day trip there an back.
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Coronado High School
1960. Though remodeled extensively in 2006/7, parts of Ralph Haver's original campus design remain. The building is notable for its folded-plate (zigzag) roofline for the gym. The current buildings echo this shape in contemporary style.
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Phoenix Metro Retro
708 W Hazelwood St
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
Specializing in Danish Modern and modern style through the decades, Tom and Karl's inventory at Phoenix Metro Retro is always fresh enough to come back and find something new. Also selling artwork by contemporary artists, and sleek neo-modern jewelry by Heidi Abrahamson.
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Modern Lighting
5016 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
Modern Lighting carries and dazzling array of vintage light fixtures, home decor accessories, and some furniture.
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Red Modern Funiture
201 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, 85012
(602) 256-9620
Situated in a rare and rehabilitated Ralph Haver 2-story building, Jonathan Wayne of Red Modern Furniture specializes in midcentury modern furnishings with an impressive collection of high quality pieces. The building also houses mint, a vintage clothing boutique.
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Frances Boutique, Stinkweeds, Halo and Red Hot Robot
12 W Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
Shop vintage fashion at Frances while you check out this funky rehabbed mini-strip mall containing four uber-cool independently-owned shops in the heart of Uptown.
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Go-Kat-Go
5102 N 7th St
Phoenix, AZ 85014, US
Vintage stuff and new retro schwag for the hot-rodder and his roller derby girl. Best place to buy something new that looks old.
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Retro Ranch
4303 N 7th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
Bradford's eclectic collection of vintage midcentury furnishings, accessories, art and fashion is primely situated in the heart of Melrose on 7th -- one of the few pedestrian friendly avenues of Phoenix. Park and walk your way to several vintage and independently-owned shops.
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Design Within Reach
4821 N Scottsdale Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1967. This rehabbed vintage Valley National Bank building now houses the Design Within Reach showroom.

Designed by Weaver and Drover, with Frank Henry and Alden Barsted.
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2bmod
4158 N Goldwater Blvd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
20th Century design reigns at 2bmod with brand new, authorized reproductions and vintage collectible furnishings. Marcel's modest store holdings are just a fraction of what is available.
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Taliesin West
Fountain Hills, AZ, US
Frank Lloyd Wright's winter residence and school still operates today. Their tours are a must-see for any visitor interested in desert modernism.
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Gammage Auditorium
By Frank Lloyd Wright, Designed in 1957, Built in 1964. Originally designed for the King of Baghdad, an unfortunate assassination led to the repurposing of these unbuilt auditorium plans by then President of ASU, Grady Gammage. This swirling, circular birthday cake of an auditorium represents Wright at his most effervescent, and is designed to be as acoustically perfect as possible from every seat in the house.
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Farmer Education Building
This four-story ASU building was designed by Valley legend Ed Varney and Associates in 1962 and features patterned precast concrete grilles to protect windows from the sun. Massive covered walkways of concrete connect the building with others in the complex nearby. Despite its stoic and uninterrupted exterior, the interior courtyard is a lively tropical space that lifts the eyes skyward with the patterns and textures of freefloating stairways.
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Social Sciences Building
Designed by Ralph Haver and Associates in 1959. Notable for its precast concrete relief designs in the courtyard.

Building has four floors but the fourth was condemned in 2003 due to structural issues.
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Hayden Library
Designed in 1967 and expanded underground in 1987. The 1967 portion is Weaver & Drover.
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Moeur Activity Building
1938. WPA.

Added to the National Register in 1985.
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Cady Mall
1967. The university converted several streets to pedestrian malls.

Named in 1975 in honor of Gilbert Cady, whose work as head of business affairs for ASU gave him considerable influence on the development of the campus.
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Armstrong Hall
1966, expanded 1988. The home for the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law. Plenty of unusual angles and dome structures.
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Engineering Center
1956 (the south A building) through 1963 (the north G building). The entire complex except for the 1990 annex across from Engineering Center A is Haver. This center once housed an IBM 704 computer and a TV studio.
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Luke Air Force Base housing
Exact location unknown, but some Haver Homes must be around here somewhere! Built circa 1956 by Ralph Haver with Johannessen & Girard.
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Scottsdale Center for the Arts
Scottsdale Center for the Arts
7380 E 2nd St, Scottsdale, AZ,
1975. Curving walls, public entries and clerestories define the atrium designed by Bennie Gonzales.
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Beadle Residence aka "White Gates"
ENDANGERED. On the Az Preservation Foundations Top Ten Endangered Places list for 2007. Designed by Al Beadle in 1964, this property hs fallen into serious disrepair and will likely take millions to restore it. Visit Modernphoenix.net for more information and updates.
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Name Changed?? formerly Vintage Solutions
Focusing more on accessories, glassware, appliances, small furnishings and "stuff" than other vintage stores, the quality and selection at Vintage Solutions is excellent.
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Motorola Government Electronics
8201 East McDowell Road
Scottsdale, AZ 85257, USA
1956. 2 story 173,000 sq ft plant. Comprised of a central tower that doubled as an antenna test station.
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Let It Roll Bowl (formerly Sunset Bowl)
Bowling, retro-style! Would not be shocked at all to find out this is a Ralph Haver design.
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AMF Bowling Center
Bowling, retro-style, complete with peaked polynesian style rooflines!
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Phoenix Baptist Hospital
Interesting and unknown origin.
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Do Wah Diddy Collectibles
AZ, US
http://www.dowahdiddy.com/
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Saint Maria Goretti Catholic Church
6261 N Granite Reef Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85250, US
1972. Earthlings, your church has landed! Wendell E. Rossman, of Rossman and Cartmell, the team who designed the VNB branch at Los Acros, and the Law School building on the ASU campus.
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Glass and Garden Drive-Up Church
8620 E McDonald Dr
Scottsdale, AZ 85250, US
1966. Main sanctuary has circular plan that is a 'symbol of eternity for it has no beginning and no end." The dome is cast 6" thick concrete.
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Crossroads United Methodist Church
N Central Ave & E Northern Ave
Phoenix, AZ, US
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Arizona State Hospital Chapel
Arizona State Hospital
Phoenix, AZ 85008, US
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First Christian Church
6750 N 7th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
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Unitarian Universalist
4027 E Lincoln Dr
Paradise Valley, AZ 85253, US
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Holy Cross Lutheran Church
3110 N Hayden Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1961. among the best modern buildings in Phoenix. Modern in the truest sense, striking and different but nothing phony or showy about it. That rhythmic waffle-roof is used wonderfully, and there's real taste and sensitivity at work here. True to its function, true to the spatial logic of its efficient concrete-shell structure, barely altered from its original 1961 configuration, well-loved, cared-for, healthy, and in marvelous condition. The tower is two concrete slabs, complicated curves that come together in a complicated way, a sculpted object of considerable grace.
Inside the sanctuary, there's a comfortable community feeling from the 1960s, a space that must help keep the congregation together, a space I find haunting because that spatial feeling of integrated and cooperative community, down to the fixtures and furnishings, feels like my own childhood. Perhaps yours too.
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Former Arizona Bank by Raph Haver
4231 E Thomas Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85018, US
Former Arizona Bank building by Ralph Haver & Associates circa 1961, currently in classic Pepto Bismol and Mylanta color scheme. Unsure if this is original scheme, but it certainly matches many a Haver bathroom tile combo!
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Orchard House
Charles and Arthur Schreiber introduced the Valley to condominium living with the Orchard House. Check out the Frank Henry designed church across the street!
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Arcadia
Large lush lots, 50s ranch homes (many designed by the Schreiber brothers) and an alarming number of teardowns characterize this classic upscale community in Phoenix.

Winner 2008 Most Desirable Neighborhood
Runner-up 2008 Most Beautiful Neighborhood

Our readers say:
"Arcadia should have been a great Mid-Century resource of Modern homes, interspersed with what was a nationally significant collection of of California Ranches. Unfortunately, the remodeling, updating and McMansionization of Arcadia has caused irreparable damage to the historic character and context, and a loss of integrity that fully compromises the significance of the resource from a historic preservation standpoint. Anything, WE do now is too little, too late, especially north of Lafayette Blvd. We must do a historical significance survey before the survivors are trashed."
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West Sunnyslope
Originally built up as a tuberculosis camp for the ill seeking refuge in the Valley, this neighborhood features beautiful sloping foothills, killer views of downtown, and the Phoenix Mountain Preserve in your backyard. Not to mention some of the best values in town for little ranchburger homes and even a few midcentury modern designs. Drive every street north of Dunlap and you'll find the Xeros residence and a few other contemporary surprises.

Runner-up 2008 Best Value
Runner up 2008 Rising Star
Runner Up 2008 Best Investment

Our readers say:
"Unlimited Potential!"
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Manzanita
Worth a driveby for some contemporary styled fixer-upers.
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Quebedeaux Chevrolet / The Paper Heart
750 Grand Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85007, US
Designed by Victor Gruen under supervising architect Ralph Haver in 1955.
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Paradise Country Estates
1955 subdivision. Construction by Riskas. Architectural designs by Wong & Hall, Beadle & Assoc.
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Price House
7211 N Tatum Blvd
Paradise Valley, AZ 85253, US
Designed in 1954 by Frank Lloyd Wright. Private residence, do not disturb.
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Pasadena Tract MCM duplexes
Charming midcentury modern duplexes and several condo complexes in this neighborhood, including La Pueblo Bonita by Haver, Nunn and Collamer, and Mockingbird Northeast (Maybe Haver?)
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The Boardwalk by Al Beadle
A Phoenix Favorite!
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Capstone Cathedral
4633 E Shea Blvd
Phoenix, AZ, United States
!
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Ascension Lutheran Church
7100 N Mockingbird Ln
Paradise Valley, AZ, United States
Designed by William Wesley Peters in 1964, Frank Lloyd Wright's son in law
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Avenida Hermosa Condos (late era Haver)
E Avenida Hermosa
Phoenix, AZ, US
Haver, Nunn and Jensen do Spanish style to the hilt in this classic Phoenix condo complex.
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The Triange Building
1960s era
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Park Circle
Featuring "The Copenhagen", "The Vendome" , "The Milford" and "The moroccan" models
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Carla Vista
400 N Evergreen St
Chandler, AZ 85225, US
A small neighborhood with Ralph Haver designed homes in both Town and Country and Starlite models.
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Tierra del Sol
Beadle and Wooldridge homes
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Epicenter of former Drake Homes
There used to be eight Blaine Drake homes in this area, including the Owen House, Colpitt House and Scoville House -- now there are only two.
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Sans Souci neighborhood
Blaine Drake and other interesting stuff.
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Regents Park
Economy Haver Homes on the edge of Arcadia.
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Ingleside Manor
Peggy Reed house by Ralph Haver used to be around here somewhere. Some nice moderns in the area, endangered by McMansionization.
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Sherwood Estates
Grand and classic custom desert midcentury ranch homes.
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Moundview
2330 N 55th St
Phoenix, AZ 85008, US
Some very unique Mid Century Modern homes along with a stand alone Haver - a Town and Country plan
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Arthur Brown House
107 W 5th St
Tucson, AZ 85705, US
Arthur Brown 1966 Flecha Caida Ranch Estates
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The Triad Case Study Apartments
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Phoenix Homesteads
A few early plain modern ranches
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Farmers & Stockmens Bank
5001 E Washington St
Phoenix, AZ 85034, US
1951 by Pereira & Luckman
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First National Bank
1769 Grand Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85007, US
1952 by Edward Varney & Associates
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First National Bank
1 S 24th St
Phoenix, AZ 85034, US
1966 by Kenneth Oberg & Associates
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First National Bank
5050 N 24th St
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
1970 by Flatow, Moore, Bryan & Fairburn
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Valley National Bank
1400 N 1st St
Phoenix, AZ 85004, US
1954 by Weaver & Drover
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Valley National Bank
3001 N 24th St
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
1955 by Weaver & Drover
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Valley National Bank
1845 E McDowell Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85006, US
1956 by Weaver & Drover
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Valley National Bank
5041 N 16th St
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
1956 by Weaver & Drover
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Valley National Bank
201 W Indian School Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
1955 by Weaver & Drover
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Valley National Bank
2901 N 7th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
1958 by Weaver & Drover
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Valley National Bank
5056 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
1959
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Valley National Bank
6002 S Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85041, US
1961
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Valley National Bank
1528 E Buckeye Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85034, US
1965
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Valley National Bank
2950 W Peoria Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85029, US
1975 by Mather Architects
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Bank of Douglas/Arizona Bank
4231 E Thomas Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85018, US
1961 by Ralph Haver & Assoc.
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Arizona Bank
6015 N 16th St
Phoenix, AZ 85014, US
1963 by Ralph Haver & Assoc.
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Arizona Bank
2750 W Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85017, US
1969 by William Cartmell
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Arizona Bank
5044 N 44th St
Phoenix, AZ 85018, US
1969 by Flatow, Moore, Bryan & Fairburn
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Arizona Bank
51 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
1972 by Dean Glasco
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First Federal Savings & Loan
5210 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
1969 by Alfred Beadle
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Pioneer Bank/Home Savings & Loan
3443 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
1964 by W.A. Sarmiento.

Now Phoenix Financial Center
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Western Savings & Loan
5102 W Indian School Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85031, US
1972 by Alfred Beadle
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Western Savings & Loan
4350 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85018, US
1972 by Calvin Straub
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Western Savings & Loan
10005 N Metro Pkwy E
Phoenix, AZ 85051, US
1975 by W.A. Sarmiento
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St. Luke's Medical Center
1920 E Van Buren St
Phoenix, AZ 85006, US
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Haver Office Building
207 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
1948 by Ralph Haver
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Koko Club
2401 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
1951 by Ralph Haver. Burned down 1959.
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Entz-White Lumber Company
909 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85014, US
1953 by Haver & Nunn
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Waldo Plumbing Company
2710 E Washington St
Phoenix, AZ 85034, US
1954 by Haver & Nunn
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Barrow's Furniture Showroom
2800 E Broadway Blvd
Tucson, AZ 85716, US
1955 by Haver & Nunn.

Now Child and Family Resources.

Ralph Haver’s design for the Barrows Furniture Showroom incorporated an innovative and unique structural system. Bowstring trusses and a unique 2x6 roof-decking system are left exposed within the interior spaces, creating a warehouse-like character. The subtle curvature of the roof was also unusual at the time of construction and foretold a shift towards a more sculptural Modern architecture that would come in the 1960s.

The Barrows Furniture Showroom is significant as an early example of the expressionist phase of Modern architecture in Tucson. It is also significant as the only known commercial work in Tucson of a master, architect Ralph Haver.
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Blocher Building (Paul Blocher)
814 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85014, US
1955 by Haver & Nunn, suspected to be the That's a Wrap! building (formerly Lola Tapas)
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Durant's Restaurant Remodeling
2611 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85004, US
1956 by Haver & Nunn
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Globe Medical Center
703 E Ash St
Globe, AZ 85501, US
1957. suspected Haver.
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Tower Plaza Shopping Center
3713 E Thomas Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85018, US
1958 by Haver & Nunn
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Regency House
2323 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85004, US
1969 by Haver & Nunn
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Arizona Bank / The Vig Uptown
6015 N 16th St
Phoenix, AZ 85014, US
1961 by Haver & Nunn.

Arizona Bank was designed by Ralph Haver's firm in the year 1961. In 1963 it was granted an AIA Regional Award for Excellence in Design. There are no loadbearing walls within the building. The entire roof is held up by enormous prestressed concrete posts and beams. In short, this thing is a tank!

In 2010, the Vig Uptown is rehabilitating the building for use as a neighborhood pub.
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First Federal Savings and Loan
7015 E Camelback Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1963 by Haver & Nunn. Demolished. Now Fashion Square Parking
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Barrow's Camelback Furniture
2450 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
1963 by Haver & Nunn. Demolished 1998(?)
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Del Webb Office and Warehouse
4831 N 11th St
Phoenix, AZ 85014, US
1963 by Haver & Nunn.
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Polynesian Plaza Additions
6701 E McDowell Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85257, US
1964 by Haver & Nunn
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Cine Capri Theater
2424 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
1964 by Haver & Nunn. Demolished 1998. Phoenix's most luxurious Cinerama theater was built as the second phase of what was intended to be a larger development.
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Valley National Branch Bank/Mardi Gras Costume Shop
5895 N Granite Reef Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85250, US
1964 by Haver & Nunn.
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Redburn Tire Center
3801 W Clarendon Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85019, US
1965 by Haver & Nunn
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Newman Center
230 E University Dr
Tempe, AZ 85281, US
By Haver & Nunn. Demolished 2011.
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77 E Missouri Townhomes
77 E Missouri Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
By Haver & Nunn
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Phoenix Merchandise Mart
34 E Jackson St
Phoenix, AZ 85004, US
1946 by Ed Varney

Acquired by Michael Levine in 2005 Currently Downtown Mini Storage
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Neil B. McGinnis Equipment Company
45 W Buchanan St
Phoenix, AZ 85003, US
1945 by Gilmore & Varney (Draftsman Fred Weaver)

Alternative address: 500 South Central

aka Allis Chalmers Tractor Dealership

Acquired by Michael Levine in 2006
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General Sales Building
515 E Grant St
Phoenix, AZ 85004, US
1946 by Lescher & Mahoney

Built by Del Webb, 122,120 SF

The following information provided by Donna Reiner:
The building was slated to open August 1, 1946. The warehouse, estimated to cost $450,000, would include room for expansion, a steel roof, a model grocery store, frozen food storage rooms, loading dock at freight car and truck level, and modern fluorescent lighting systems. Over the years, the building had a number of different food related businesses in it. For example, in the 1951 city directory, there were 8 food businesses listed including General Sales. General Sales only appears in the city directories from the 1947/48-1954 at this address. Over time, it has also been vacant. This eventually became Fry’s Food Stores general office by the late 1960s. In 1973, it was listed as the Motorola Warehouse Distribution (the only nonfood related listing). However, the site was not even listed in the 1973 & 1974 directories.
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RNL Design
100 W Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
Architects Row. Listed as office of Paul Eugene Buchli (designer of Roman Roads) in 1963

Now RNL Design
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Spotted Dog Studio
5210 N 22nd St
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
Listed as office of Blaine Drake in 1956, 1963 AIA directory
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Richard Drover's Office
128 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
Listsed as office of Richard E. Drover in 1956, 1962
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4747 Building
4747 N 16th St
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
1960. Listed as Robert Starkovich office (Suite A-127) in 1963 AIA directory. First building in Phoenix designed with fully covered tenant parking.
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Calvin Struab Office
5247 N Invergordon Rd
Paradise Valley, AZ 85253, US
Listed as Calvin Struab's office in 1963 AIA directory
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Donald VanEss Offices
7000 E Camelback Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
Listed as Donald VanEss offices in 1963 AIA directory
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Edward Varney Jr Offices
221 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
Listed as Edward Varney Jr offices in 1956, 1958, 1963 AIA directories
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Bennie Gonzales Office
4038 W Van Buren St
Phoenix, AZ 85009, US
Demoed???
Bennie Gonzales office listed 1963 AIA guide
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Ed Varney's architectural office
221 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
listed as Edward Varney Jr.'s office in 1956/1958/1963 AIA directories

Curent address is an AutoZone
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Sunnyside School
3151 E Greenway Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85032, US
1948 by Haver & Nunn (cost $12,000)
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Pilot Training School
1951 by Haver & Nunn (Cost $2,000,000)
Marana AFB. From 1951–56, Marana was reused as a contractor-operated USAF flying school, operated by Darr Aeronautical Technical Company. It is now known as
Pinal Airpark, the home of Evergreen Aircraft Maintenance Facility and Silverbell Army Heliport (SAHP).
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Maricopa School
45012 W Honeycutt Ave
Maricopa, AZ 85139, US
1954-60 (3 phases) by Haver and Nunn (Cost $342,579)
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Lukachukai School
Rte 13
Lukachukai, AZ 86507, US
1956 by Haver & Nunn (Cost $780,000)
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Kaibab Elementary School
4323 N 62nd St
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1957-62 (3 phases) by Haver and Nunn (Cost $500,000)
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Kayenta Indian School
Main Rd
Kayenta, AZ 86033, US
1957 by Haver & Nunn (Cost $1,500,000) Now Kayenta Community School (?)
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Shepherd of the Valley School
1500 W Maryland Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85015, US
1958 by Haver & Nunn (Cost $255,000)
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St Vincent DePaul School
3130 N 51st Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85031, US
1959 Haver & Nunn
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Theta Delta Chi Fraternity House
E Alpha Dr
Tempe, AZ 85281, US
1961 by Haver & Nunn.
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Washington Elementary School
8033 N 27th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85051, US
1964 by Haver & Nunn. (Cost $260,000)
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Snowflake High School
1380 S Main St
Snowflake, AZ 85937, US
1968 by Haver & Nunn. (Cost $420,000)
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Pima Plaza
7237 E 1st Ave
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1953. Two story retail structure and one-story wing focused on a courtyard. A contemporary interpretation of the western style with a low pitched roof and symmetrical composition and board and batten siding.
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Pink Pony Restaurant
3831 N Scottsdale Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1954 (1970 historic alteration) Unique curved elevation, recessed doors flanked by raised flagstone planters, stepped overhang and patterned fascia.

Restaurant closed in 2009.
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Triangle Building
7122 E Indian School Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1962 by Ralph Haver. Two story retail/office building. symmetrical low pitched roof, wood columns, exposed beam ends and open balcony.
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Messinger Mortuary & Chapel
7601 E Indian School Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1958. Addition to the Messigner Mortuary includes a 6,700 sq ft chapel and waiting room. Constructed of masonry, glass, wood framing, wide halls and a shaded north entry. zThe entry is supported by steel tree-form columns that were fitted with French stained glass
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Scottsdale Fashion Square
7014 E Camelback Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1960s. The L shaped Lenart Building was designed by Edward L. Varney. But if you're looking for MCM inspiration here you might not be able to find it.
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Papago Lanes
2020 N Scottsdale Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85257, US
1960. Originally built as a bowling alley by Donald T. Van Ess. The structure was innovative with masonry walls supporting pretensioned thin shell concrete vaults with projecting ends and exposed stone walls.

Currently home to the Antique Trove.
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Trader Vic's Restaurant
Scottsdale, AZ, US
1962
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Gauranty Bank
7111 E Camelback Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1968
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Valley National Bank - Los Arcos Branch
7345 E McDowell Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85257, US
1962. At McDowell and 74th Street in Scottsdale there is a 'space age' branch bank over by the Los Arcos site. It's a good solid building and strongly modern in vintage and inspiration, a one story high ceilinged 5000-square-foot bank oriented towards the street, built as a Valley National Bank, opened on October 14, 1963, still healthy as a Chase branch.
The original architects were (William H.) Cartwell and (Wendell E.) Rossman, about whom I can't find anything, now forgotten, their memories replaced by Cartman and Roswell.

The most striking design element is the system of "V-frame tubular steel columns" supporting the roof in the front, very noticable from the street, looking advanced in an old-fashioned way. Actually it looks like WVW. For my money this counts as both good engineering (because this roof support allows a tall clean glass wall with deep shade, resulting in a very pleasant effect from inside) and good showmanship (because those columns could just as well have been simple vertical supports).
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Valley Plaza/Los Arcos Methodist Church
7425 E Culver St
Scottsdale, AZ 85257, US
1966. DEMOLISHED! Its appearance in this spot, and its motto ("Church in the Marketplace"), are connected to the nearby Los Arcos Mall. The low, gentle, almost material exterior shape here is consistent with at least one more church-of-the-future, the 1962 Priory Chapel in suburban St. Louis, and with the old La Concha Motel on the Las Vegas strip. All three of these buildings are derivative of the work of the great Mexican architect-engineer Felix Candela, a true innovator in thin-shell paraboloid concrete structures of the time.

Like this one they tended to be white. They were all round in floorplan, of course. And like any other architectural curves, the twelve arches of Los Arcos required expensive custom construction. The buttresses are a clue that the engineering here was less 'pure' than in other buildings, either by design or in mid-course correction or in retro-fix.
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Maynard Chiropractic Center
1920 N Scottsdale Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85257, US
A 1960s pavillion with a symmetrical plan. Made of exposed concrete panels and a cantilevered roof.
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Camelview Theater
7001 E Highland Ave
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1960s. A trio of custom fabricated steel canopies of varying sizes define the entry
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Arizona Bank
Scottsdale, AZ, US
1960s. The bank's character is a hybrid of vertical panels and angled horizontal glass bands respond to the sun's angles.
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Scottsdale Car Wash
7501 E Indian School Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1971. Constructed of exposed concrete block, cantilevered concrete beams with wood and glass infill. Architect Richard Caviness, copper Downs and Associates
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Arcadia High School
4703 E Indian School Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85018, US
1959.
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Saguaro High School
6250 N 82nd St
Scottsdale, AZ 85250, US
1966. Walls are made of concrete panels , with a roof of concrete tees and glass inserts. Natural concrete is complemented by color inserts.
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Scottsdale Community College
9000 E Chaparral Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85256, US
1970. The campus is based on a 4-foot grid and a main mall. The theme is based on southwestern basket weave patterns, also reflected in the concrete panels. Richard Drover, Frank Henry and Wallace E. Welch.
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First Church of Christ, Scientist
6427 E Indian School Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1962. Burnt adobe walls. concrete grillage, precast concrete roof and copper fascia. Received Valley Beautiful Citizens Committee Award in 1969.
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Scottsdale City Government Complex
3739-3939 N Drinkwater Blvd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1968. Award winning campus containing Scottsdale City Hall and library. Sculpted 2X thick walls, recessed windows and whiteness is appropriate for the dessert climate
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Patrick Residence
6628 E Exeter Blvd
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1973. Steel structure, U-shape plan
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Corbus Residence
11101 E Bajada Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85262, US
1978. on 5 acres. Designed to float above a desert ravine, creating a matrix that uses the natural boulders to form and define various living experiences.
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Focus House
10800 E Cactus Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85259, US
1986. Amazingly tasteful for 1986! Part of Taliesin Gates neighborhood. All walls have fluted texture that is self-shading and reflects saguaro cactus ribs. Low pitched copper roof and recessed windows
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Taliesin Gates
Houses designed by Taliesin Architects
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Scottsdale Medical and Professional Center
7350 E Stetson Dr
Scottsdale, AZ 85251, US
1960s. Slump block walls. aluminum windows, horizontal louvers and a patterned concrete fascia.
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Kon Tiki Hotel
2364 E Van Buren St
Phoenix, AZ 85006, US
The last and greatest of the hotels and motels on Van Buren. "A little bit of Waikiki in the heart of Phoenix." It was as nice as any hotel in town, and it marked the end of an era. Jet airplanes had arrived at Sky Harbor and Van Buren was already in decline. A postcard that describes the Kon Tiki as follows: Fabulous Polynesean atmosphere in the midst of Phoenix. Only minutes to all business and points of interest. One "short mile" from Phoenix Sky-harbor Airport. Complete hotel services with personal attention, and Kon Tiki enjoys the City's most wonderful food by the valley's finest chef -- Come to the Kon Tiki and take away a life long memory.
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First Federal Savings & Loans / Washburn Piano
1963. The circular Washburn Piano store was built as a bank by architects Varney, Sexton and Sydnor. it was later used as the showroom for the Washburn Piano and Organ Company. It closed in 2005. The building was demolished in 2007.
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Western Savings & Loan
1965 By Ralph Wyatt. Currently a Bank of America branch
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5th Avenue Professional Building
3411 N 5th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
The 5th Ave Professional building was designed by Alfred Newman Beadle. Al Beadle (1927 - 1998) was a pioneer of the mid century modernist movement. He designed single family homes, multi-family homes, and commercial structures, with an emphasis on minimalism. He was known as the "glass and steel man".

Al Beadle's designs have won numerous awards and been featured in national and international publications. The 5th Ave Professional building is an excellent example of his creative style.
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Vig Uptown
6015 N 16th St
Phoenix, AZ 85014, US
1963. The Vig Uptown's location is in Ralph Haver's AIA award-winning architecture. in 2009/2010 Circle West Architects stripped away decades of add-ons to reveal the structure in a new way.
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Valley National Bank
4401 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85018, US
1967. Originally a Valley National Bank (Bank One's predecessor). This free-spirited bank building, designed by Frank Henry, Taliesin Fellow, in 1963, is a classic example of Phoecian bank architecture of the time. Fondly known as the "mushroom bank" building, the site is characterized by monolithic cast concrete shade structures. The site has recently undergone serious preservation struggles as a developer has proposed to build condos upon the open space of the site. Due to great efforts in the preservation community, the site is currently safe until fall of 2008.
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Stewart Motor Company
802 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85003, US
Since 1947 The Stewart Motor Company building, designed by W. Z. Smith, has been an important landmark in commercial architecture in Phoenix. Best known today as Circles Discs and Tapes from 1972 - 2009, the building is eligible for — but not been registered — as a historic property.
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Valley National Bank
5628 E Thomas Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85251, US
1965. An ingenious Modernist building where the mass and strength of a exposed pre-cast concrete roof structure is mirrored in an inverted arcade.
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Pohle Dry Cleaning
3233 E Van Buren St
Phoenix, AZ 85034, US
1946. A progressive International Style building that retains it's character after more than sixty years.
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First National Bank of Arizona
1 S 24th St
Phoenix, AZ 85034, US
1966. Notable for its four large hexagonal concrete parasols.
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Paris Laundry & Dry Cleaning
4130 N 7th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
1957. The roof mounted sign and Googie style boomerang shape of the tilting columns give the building the look of a drive-in restaurant.
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Valley National Bank
4401 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85018, US
1967. VNB President Walter Bimson selected this sophisticated Modernist design by Frank Henry from among five competing submissions. The curvilinear composition of parasols and stone studded walls has stood the test of time. It won the AIA AZ 25 year Award proving to be one of Arizona's most distinguished and beloved Modernist buildings
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A.J. Bayless Supermarket
2715 W Van Buren St
Phoenix, AZ 85009, US
1950. This early post-war supermarket incorporates the horizontality of Streamlined Moderne with the simplicity of Bauhaus cubist forms.
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Stockyards Restaurant
5009 E Washington St
Phoenix, AZ 85034, US
1954. International Style blended with Southwest Overtones.
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First Federal Savings & Loan
5210 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
1969. Al Beadle combined the ideals of Mies and Wright into his own expression of New Formalism.
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Basha's Supermarket
3320 N 7th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
1956. A good example of a Modernist Style supermarket.
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Bill Johnson's Big Apple
3757 E Van Buren St
Phoenix, AZ 85034, US
1956. Boomtown facade with rustic Ranch Style materials.
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First National Bank of Arizona - Biltmore Branch
5050 N 24th St
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
1970. Design by William O. Jette. one of Phoenix's best examples of Brutalism.
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Corral Drive In
6245 S Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85042, US
1952. Best remaining example of a Googie drive-in left in Phoenix.
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Jimmy Jack's
2933 W Van Buren St
Phoenix, AZ 85009, US
1957. An example of the original prototype of the McDonald's fast food stand.
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Pruitt's
3425 E Thomas Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85018, US
1960. This combination of French Colonial Revival and Classical Revival was rarely seen in mid-century Phoenix.
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Durant's
2611 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85004, US
1947. A low key 'hide-out' purposefully designed to be unnoticeable, yet refined.
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Encanto Village Shopping Center
2801 N 15th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85007, US
1946. Bridges the gap from a strip of adjacent store fronts to a three dimensional shopping center. its Spanish Eclectic Style reflects houses in nearby Encanto-Palmcroft.
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Phoenix Star Theatre
440 N 32nd St
Phoenix, AZ 85008, US
1963. Brutalism in the Round natural concrete theater. (The structural engineer was T. Y. Lin international.)
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Town & Country
2021 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
1956. The only open air shopping center from the 1950s that has survived with its character intact.
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Veteran's Memorial Coliseum
1826 W McDowell Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85007, US
1964. w/ T.Y. Lin international
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Turf Paradise
1501 W Bell Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85023, US
1954.it is the modern style of the enormous cantilevered steel roof rather than the architectural style that is the important aspect of the building.
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Bob's Big Boy
1954
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Palms Theater
N Central Ave & W Cambridge Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85004, US
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300 Bowl
1919 W Bethany Home Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85015, US
1958. One of the few remaining Googie Style buildings in Phoenix
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Katz's Deli (Postino Central)
5144 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
Renovated 2009.
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Del Webb's TownHouse
100 W Clarendon Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
Phoenix's first mixed use, high rise tower containing business offices above and a hotel/convention center below.
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Parlor
1916 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
Original location of Salon De Venus. Rebuilt in 2009 using much of the same material and many of the same fixtures, etc.
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Paul Johnson Jewelers Building
1940 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
Now Law Offices of Caldwell and Ober
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Del Webb's Chistown Mall
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Dr. Glass Dental Office
3852 N 15th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85015, US
1951. Usonian inspired building similar to the 'textile block' construction system of the Arizona Biltmore. At least three others examples of this unique Usonian style have been identified in Phoenix.
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Professional Building
15 E Monroe St
Phoenix, AZ 85004, US
Art Moderne style. Pre-war home office for the Valley National Banks
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Conn & Candlin CPA Office
2701 N 7th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85003, US
1962. A direct descendant of Taliesin West.
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Helsing's Coffee Shop
Another location was located at Central and Camelback.
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Farmer's & Stockmens Bank
5001 E Washington St
Phoenix, AZ 85034, US
1950. A modernist hybrid, contrasting desert masonry and a glass curtain wallis a companion to the adjacent building containing the Stockyards restaurant.
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Dental Arts
3326 N 3rd Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
1969. 'Box on silts" design was a popular solution in Phoenix fro providing shaded parking while maximizing the leasable area of an office building.
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First National Bank of Arizona
1769 Grand Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85007, US
1952. Influenced by Usonian house designs with a low-scaled horizontal roof plane and cantilevered overhangs as well as the use of native fieldstone.
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Camelback Office
201 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
1957. A masterful example of the Miesian approach to the International Style.
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Read Mullan Ford Showroom
1960. Demolished 2009. Was once the corner-stone of automobile dealership row in post-war Phoenix.
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Valley National Bank
201 W Indian School Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
1957. Designed by Herman Jacoby, of Weaver and Drover. A aterling example of Phoenix's modernist buildings. Constructed of stone and glass it subtly blends an open floor plan with a green outdoor landscape. Was recently rehabbed and inhabited by Hoskin Ryan Consultants.
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Truxal Building
300 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
1960. The exaggerated Modernist features on the facade give the building a playful character.
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Union Service Station
1742 E McDowell Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85006, US
1950.Steamline Moderne design
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Valley National Bank - Willetta Branch
1505 N 1st St
Phoenix, AZ 85004, US
1954. Winner of the 1955 AIA Arizona Craftsmanship award for the brickwork of this "building that showcases good design and the progressive attitudes of modern Phoenix Bankers.
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Murdock Professional Building (Stewart Plaza)
240 W Osborn Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
1958. 19,500 sq ft. An excellent example of the two story courtyard office building design popular at the time for professional and medical offices.

It was the first building in Arizona to comply with building code requirements for earthquake resistance.
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Camelback East Enco Service Station
3940 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85018, US
1969. A Contemporary Style gas station that combines the crisp lines of Modernism with the rustic materials of a traditional residence.
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Valley National Bank
5041 N 16th St
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
1956. A bigger version of the 1954 branch bank at 3001 North 24th St. Incorporates International Style design elements to control the dessert environment
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Rainbow Car Wash
3003 E Indian School Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
1965
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FHA Office Building (Stewart Title)
244 W Osborn Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
1959. Early project of the David Murdock Development Company for the US Federal Housing Administration and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
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West Camelback Car Wash
2550 W Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85017, US
1967
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Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Co.
3136 N 3rd Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
1959. The Modernists character of the building combines the principles of the International Style with those of FLW organic architecture.
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City Center Motel
612 W Van Buren St
Phoenix, AZ 85007, US
1959. A rare surviving example of Googie Style roadside design, this is a fine motel demonstration of Wright's "form and function are one."
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Lescher & Mahoney Office
407 W Osborn Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
1963. Studio of architects Lescher & Mahoney until Mahoney retired in 1974. The building displays many different modernist principles.
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Desert Inn
950 W Van Buren St
Phoenix, AZ 85007, US
1951
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Egyptian Motor Hotel
765 Grand Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85007, US
1965
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Mardian Construction Company Headquarters
3815 N Black Canyon Hwy
Phoenix, AZ 85015, US
1965. To honor the firms 25th anniversary, the company built this building to reflect their pride and gratitude to the community. it's New Formalist form is unmistakably inspired by Edward Durell Stone's 1954 US Embassy in New Delhi. it is a rare example of this form of Modernism in Phoenix.
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Imperial '400' Motel
201 N 7th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85007, US
1960. Googie Style roofline.
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Vagabond Hotel
3644 E Van Buren St
Phoenix, AZ 85008, US
1961. A Wright influence Refined Modernist design and materials.
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Green Gables
2345 E Thomas Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
1946. Fantasy styled Period Revival of an English manor house.
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Vlassis Ruzow & Associates Office
1545 W Thomas Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85015, US
1974. Remarkable imagery of steel and glass floating above the earth. Reminiscent of the Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois.
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Dental Office
3132 N 7th St
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
Designed in the Usonian manner or Wright using bond concrete blocks
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Adelmann House
5802 N 30th St
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
1951
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Financial Center Pavilions
3443 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
1963
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David Wright House
5212 E Exeter Blvd
Phoenix, AZ 85018, US
1952. This curved house of concrete block was designed for David Wright, Frank's son.
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Western Savings & Loan
10005 N Metro Pkwy
Phoenix, AZ 85051, US
1974. This unique vase-shape of this once bank branch was designed to be seen from the I-17.
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Arizona Bank Branch
51 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
1971. This Modernist Arizona Bank imparts a feeling of local cultural heritage. Curved slump block walls reflect a regional interpretation of the Pueblo Style. Now a Bank of America. (See also 2950 W Peoria Ave).
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Financial Center
3443 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
1963. Constructed by real estate developer David H. Murdock to "provide the city with a piece of landmark architecture that had never before existed in Phoenix."
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Valley National Bank Office
2950 W Peoria Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85029, US
1974. Tom Zimmerman created his own regional interpretation of Modernist architecture. Curved brick walls reflected Pueblo Revival Style and are reminiscent of FLW's Johnson Wax Building. Now a Chase Bank. (See also 51 E Camelback)
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Centeal Towers
2727 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85004, US
1959-62. Among the earliest post-war high rise office towers to be constructed along the Central Ave corridor. it was an attempt to create an environmentally responsive interpretation of New Formalism in Phoenix.
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Rosenweig Center
3800 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
1992-1971. Land owned by the Rosenweig family of successful jewelers was offered to Del Webb for his corporate headquarters. The project ended up being 18.5 arce development of several buildings and towers all designed by the same firm.
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Miracle Mile Commercial Block
1715 E McDowell Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85006, US
1949-57. First coordinated commercial development outside the downtown core. Addressed the demands of post war motorists.
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McDonald's
McDonald's 'Golden Arches' drive-up restaurant.
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Crown Filter Queen
1800 W Van Buren St
Phoenix, AZ 85007, US
1955. This commercial building has been occupied by the same business for over fifty years.
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Helsing's Coffee Shop
Another location was at Central and Osborn
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Arizona Title Building
111 W Monroe St
Phoenix, AZ 85003, US
1963. The Phoenix equivalent to van der Rohe and Johnson's 1958 Segram Building in New York. A fine example of functional aesthetics, it is considered a masterpiece of corporate Modernism.
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Bragg's Pies
1301 Grand Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85007, US
1946. A fine example of an international Style commercial building with Streamlined Moderne influences.
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Mountain Bell Plaza
3033 N 3rd St
Phoenix, AZ 85014, US
1972. The steel and glass high rise office building was the epitome of Miesean international Style architecture in Phoenix. Demolished 2009.
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General Sales Company
515 E Grant St
Phoenix, AZ 85004, US
1946. A dignified warehouse that blends Beaux Arts Classicism with Modernist influences.
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Fist National Bank Plaza (Wells Fargo)
100 W Washington St
Phoenix, AZ 85003, US
1971. An example of 'corporate modernism' based loosely on precepts of Brutalism as applied to an international style tower.
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Greenwood Memorial Lawn Mauloseum
719 N 27th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85009, US
1965
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Valley Center (Chase Tower)
201 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85004, US
1974. the tallest building in Arizona.
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Paradise Chapel
3934 E Indian School Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85018, US
1955. Built during the height of the Ranch Style period.
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Medical Center
1313 N 2nd St
Phoenix, AZ 85004, US
1949. Similar to the Stockyards restaurant in its combination of the International style with regional influences.
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Hansen Chapel
8314 N 7th St
Phoenix, AZ 85020, US
1961. An Expressionist Modern from reminiscent of the 1956 Air Force Academy Chapel.
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Doc Dombey's Motor Clinic
4243 N 7th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
1947. Now known as Chesters Garage.
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Stewart Motor Company
802 N Central Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85003, US
1947. Brought together two modern conveniences that helped generate the explosive growth of post-war period: automobiles and air-conditioning.
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Rudolph Chevrolet
2646 W Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85017, US
1966. The refined International Style Modernism matched the low key, high style sales methods associated with Rudolph Chevrolet.
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Valley National Bank
6030 N 19th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85015, US
1962. The roof arches resemble those of John Johansen's Warner House. The function of the bank as a storehouse of wealth is represented by the large bas-relief panels portraying the 'money of the world' displayed on the exterior walls.
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IBEW Union Hall
5808 N 7th St
Phoenix, AZ 85012, US
1967. Beadle's interpretation of the Miesian International Style was the winner of the 1968 Central Arizona AIA's Award of Merit.
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Western Savings And Loans
1950 E Camelback Rd
Phoenix, AZ 85016, US
1965. Expands on the characteristic International Style box, with the inclusion of planar walls that shade tall slit windows and provide visual interest. Bas-relief sculptures enhance the facade of the building. Currently a Bank of America branch.
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Hanny's
40 N 1st St
Phoenix, AZ 85004, US
1947. Significant for it's Modernist stylistic treatment and for the use of design as a merchandising technique.
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Villa Catalina Condos
521 N Country Club Rd
Tucson, AZ 85716, US
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Pueblo Gardens by A. Quincy Jones
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Brentwood
334 W Medlock Dr
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
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Phoenix Towers
1956
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Modern Manor
Modern resale warehouse
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Antique Trove
2020 N Scottsdale Rd
Scottsdale, AZ 85257, US
Consignment booths, excellent postcard and ephemera collections.
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Center of Modern Design
7550 E Greenway Rd #110
Scottsdale, AZ 85260, US
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Cliff May prefab homes?
E 22nd St & S Craycroft Rd
Tucson, AZ 85711, US
? ? ?
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Sherwood Heights
The elite place to live if you worked at Motorola in the 60s.
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Modern On Melrose
4610 N 7th Ave
Phoenix, AZ 85013, US
Specializing in furniture and designer elements, the Modern on Melrose team offers mid-century modern, industrial and upcycled home and commercial decorator items. Look for eclectic collectible gift and jewelry items in the store's special boutique areas.
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A Town and Country Home
Tucson, AZ, US
A Town and Country model home by Ralph Haver among what appear to be other Haver-esque ranch homes. The homes were built by Cheuvront and this model was called "The Linda".
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Town and Country Home by Haver
A Town and Country model home by Ralph Haver among what appear to be other Haver-esque ranch homes. The homes were built by Cheuvront and this model was called "The Linda".
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Arcadia Green
By Pierson, Miller and Ware
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The Clarendon Hotel
Our recommendation for midtown lodging
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Temple Solel
6805 E McDonald Dr
Maricopa, AZ 85253, US
By Bennie Gonzales (altered). Formerly First Christian Church.
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First Christian Chruch
7405 E McDonald Dr
Maricopa, AZ 85250, US
By Bennie Gonzales
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Valley Presbyterian Church
6947 E McDonald Dr
Maricopa, AZ 85253, US
by Harold Wagoner
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Shepherd of the Valley Church
1500 W Maryland Ave
Maricopa, AZ 85015, US
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Temple Beth Hebree
333 E Portland St
Maricopa, AZ 85004, US
Looking for new owner
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Flair homes by Palmer & Krisel
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First United Methodist Church
c. 1966. Highly likely to be Cartmell and Rossman.
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Interdisciplinary A & B
Originally the Administration and Business Administration buildings, these Edward Varney buildings from 1951 represent the arrival of Modernism to the ASU campus design.
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Life Sciences Center A-B-D
1957-60. One of several sciences buildings from Kemper Goodwin. Use of elongated windows, brick and tile create a style blending Miesian and desert influences.
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Art and Architecture Complex
A 1970 set of three buildings: Art, Design South, and Neeb Hall (lecture hall). All are done in an aggregate heavy, stark Brutalist style.
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Schwada Classroom and Office Building
ASU's final Haver, produced by Haver, Nunn and Collamer in 1979. The final building to feature a purely midcentury/brutalist aesthetic on the Tempe campus.
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Palo Verde Main
1956. One of several new dormitories built in this decade in International Style.
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Palo Verde East and West
1962/1964. At the time the university's tallest residential structures.
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Manzanita Hall
1967, with substantial (inside gutted!) renovations completed 2013. This landmark on campus represents the height of 1960s architecture at the university and was the tallest building in Tempe for 25 years.
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Physical Sciences Center
1957-60 (wings B and C); 1964 (wing D); 1968 (wing A/Wexler Hall). Wings B and C are exactly like Life Sciences Center A, wing D has some different window styles, and wing A (the southernmost wing), designed by Kemper and his son Michael, features a massive eight-story tower.
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Forestry Building
1964, Haver, now known as Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building 5. Eventually became a cancer research center which earned it a massive, non-Modernist expansion on its north side in 2001.
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Ira Payne Hall
Walsh & Oberg, 1968-69. A later educational building with an arch theme. As part of Payne Hall a covered walkway connects Farmer, Payne and the Education Lecture Hall.
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Education Lecture Hall
Accompanied Payne Hall. 1968-69.
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Wrigley Hall
George Schoneberger, 1965. Was the school of nursing until 2007. Heavily remodeled with changes to exterior appearance and environmentally friendly adaptations.
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G. Homer Durham Language and Literature Building
1963/64. The north wing was added in 1970. David Sholder did some of the original work with Kemper Goodwin working on the added wing. This is ASU's largest classroom building with 47 classrooms and offices for the foreign language, English and film studies departments.
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Physical Education West
The home of ASU basketball from 1953-1973 and the replacement of an older building on the same site.
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Physical Education East
Originally women's PE, now mostly dance. Only T. Stewart Montgomery on campus. 1965-67.
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M. O. Best Hall
1956/65. Weaver and Drover's other 1950s residence hall for the university. The three-story A and B buildings are identical to Palo Verde Main, while the C building came later and has precast concrete sunshades and awnings.
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Hayden Hall
1950-51, H. H. Green. Now mostly surrounded by/connected to some extensions in 2000 and known as Hayden South.
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Psychology North
1963. Repeating pointed arches make this Horlbeck & Hickman building a sight to see on campus and for fans of Modernism.
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Murdock Hall
1970. This Donald B. Schwenn building stacks two lecture halls on top of each other in a Brutalist package.
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Psychology Building
1971. This Donald B. Schwenn building is similar to his Murdock Hall in style and treatment.
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Wilson Hall
Originally a residence hall, it has housed university offices for more than 40 years. Kemper Goodwin, 1956.
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Business Administration Building
Pierson, Miller and Ware, 1968. Received a major expansion (the north side) in 1981.
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Memorial Union
Originally constructed 1953 and expanded by Goodwin in 1968. A third (southeast) expansion occurred in 1989 but is in more of a Postmodern style.
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Valley National Bank
The "gold dome" bank (1962, demolished 2007). The building later served as a visitor information center for ASU. The dome now resides in the Vista del Sol complex to the southwest.
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Sahuaro Hall
Built between 1956 and 1958 with an expansion in 1965, this residence hall from Horlbeck and Hickman housed students until making way for the massive Vista del Sol complex in 2007.
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Cowden Family Resources
Lescher and Mahoney, 1950-51; back/west expansion, 1974. Originally the Home Economics Building.
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McClintock Hall
Built between 1951 and 1956, originally known as the [Dixie] Gammage Hall Annex. It's still a dorm.
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Stauffer Communication Arts
Rossman and Partners, 1970-74. Formerly the home of KAET channel 8 (look for the microwave tower and satellite dish) and an example of later, more sedate Rossman design.
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Music Building
East building is from 1970, with a West building added in 1992. Look for the "wedding cake"; it's designed to match Gammage Auditorium, and it too is Taliesin Associated Architects work. (The 1992 building, not so much.)
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Life Sciences Addition (C)
Varney Sexton Sydnor, 1972. A Brutalist and massive addition to the existing Life Sciences Center that stands as its own building.
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Mountain View East
Homes by Talisein Associates (?) John Rattenbury
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Frank Henry's House
John Rattenbury