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Indonesian landfalls

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Ludmilla Creek
Spot On Marine
This is the yard where Scorpio is hauled out for yearly maintenance
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Fannie Bay
This is the anchorage where transients usually drop their hooks in Darwin. This will be our last anchorage in Australia.
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Saumlaki
Saumlaki
S7° 57’ E131° 19’
July 21 -24
Inbound Customs, Immigration, Quarantine and Port clearance.
Welcoming Ceremony by Local Government, the Bupati. Cultural Festival and Exhibition with local woven blankets, arts and crafts exhibits.
photo: faithofholland.com/WordPress/
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Banda
Banda Islands
Long before the coming of the European to Banda, these islands were the main source of pepper and fuli which were fought for by the nations in the world. On that era, these spices were brought by the Malayan merchant, Chinese merchant, and Arabic merchant, then shipped to Persian peninsula and by the merchant then were continued to Mediteranian/ Middle sea to be spread to all Europe through Constantinople, Genoa, and Venesia. Everytime these spices were moving from different hands, the prices became higher.
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Tual
Tual, Maluku
photo: flickr.com/photos/thirnbeck/447730162/
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Ambon
Ambon
Ambon Island lies off the south-west coast of the much larger Seram island. It is on the north side of the Banda Sea, part of a chain of volcanic isles that form a circle around the sea. It is 51 km (32 mi) in length, and is of very irregular shape, being almost divided into two. The south-eastern and smaller portion, a peninsula (called Leitimor) is united to the northern (Hitoe) by a narrow neck of land. Ambon city lies on the north-west of Leitimor, facing Hitoe, and has a safe harbor on Amboyna Bay.
In 1513, the Portuguese were the first Europeans to land in Ambon, and it became the new centre for Portuguese activities in Maluku following their expulsion from Ternate.[2] The Portuguese, however, were regularly attacked from native Muslims on the island's northern coast, in particular Hitu, which had trading and religious links with major port cities on Java's north coast. They established a factory in 1521, but did not obtain peaceable possession of it until 1580. Indeed, the Portuguese never managed to control the local trade in spices, and failed in attempts to establish their authority over the Banda Islands, the nearby centre of nutmeg production.

The Portuguese were dispossessed by the Dutch already in 1605, when Steven van der Hagen took over the fort and without a single shot. Ambon was the headquarters of the Dutch East Indies Company (VOC) from 1610 to 1619 until the founding of Batavia (now Jakarta) by the Dutch.[3] About 1615 the English formed a settlement on the island at Cambello, which they retained until 1623, when it was destroyed by the Dutch. Frightful tortures inflicted on its unfortunate inhabitants were connected with its destruction. In 1654, after many fruitless negotiations, Oliver Cromwell compelled the United Provinces to give the sum of 300,000 gulden, as compensation to the descendants of those who suffered in the "Ambon Massacre", together with Manhattan.[4] In 1673 the poet John Dryden produced his tragedy Amboyna; or the Cruelties of the Dutch to the English Merchants. In 1796 the British, under Admiral Rainier, captured Ambon, but restored it to the Dutch at the peace of Amiens, in 1802. It was retaken by the British in 1810, but once more restored to the Dutch in 1814. Ambon used to be the world center of clove production; until the nineteenth century, the Dutch prohibited the rearing of the clove-tree in all the other islands subject to their rule, in order to secure the monopoly to Ambon.

During the Dutch period, Ambon city was the seat of the Dutch resident and military commander of the Moluccas. The town was protected by Fort Victoria, and a 1911 encyclopedia characterized it as "a clean little town with wide streets, well planted". The population was divided into two classes orang burger or citizens, and orang negri or villagers, the former being a class of native origin enjoying certain privileges conferred on their ancestors by the old Dutch East India Company. There were also, besides the Dutch, some Arabs, Chinese and a few Portuguese settlers.

Ambon city was the site of a major Dutch military base, which was captured from Allied forces by the Japanese in the Battle of Ambon (1942), during World War II. The battle was followed by the summary execution of more than 300 Allied POWs, in the Laha massacre.

Indonesia declared its independence in 1945. As a result of ethnic and religious tensions, as well as President Sukarno's making of Indonesia a centralised state, Ambon was the scene of a revolt against the Indonesian government, which resulted in the rebellion of Republic of the South Moluccas in 1950.

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Ternate
Ternate
Ternate and it's companion Tidore around 1 kilometer away are are two companion conical volcanos over 5000 feet high and are one of the more spectacular views in all of Indonesia.
Ternate and the islands close by are the origional source of the clove tree over which the Dutch East India Company enforced a monopoly beginning in the year of 1522 and for the following 350 years.
The old ruined Portugese fort, Fort Orangie built in the year of 1607 is a nice visit in the area.
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Bitung
Bitung
Bitung, Sulawesi Utara, ID
Bitung is a city on the northern coast of the island of Sulawesi in Indonesia. It is in the province of North Sulawesi, and faces Lembeh Island and the Lembeh Strait, which is known for its colorful marine life, in particular sea slugs. Bitung has a population of more than 100,000.
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Banggai
Banggai
Banggai, Sulawesi Tengah, ID
Banggai Archipelago (Indonesian: Kepulauan Banggai) is a group of islands, which is located at the far eastern end of Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. It makes up a newly established regency (kabupaten) after splitting out of Luwuk. It is surrounded by the Banda Sea's Gulf of Tolo (Teluk Tolo), and the Molucca Sea. Peleng Straits (Selat Peleng) separates it from mainland Sulawesi.

Its islands consist of Peleng, Banggai Island, Bowokan, Labobo, Kebongan, Kotudan, Tropettenando, Timpau, Salue Besar, Salue Kecil, Masepe, and Bangkulu.
Photo: www.wallacea-divecruise.com
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Wakatobi
Wakatobi
Wakatobi is the name of an archipelago located in an area of Sulawesi Tenggara (South Eastern), Indonesia. The name Wakatobi is derived from the names of the main islands that form the archipelago: Wangiwangi Island, Kaledupa, Tomea, and Binongko. The group is part of a larger group called the Tukangbesi Islands.

The archipelago, located in the biodiverse hotspot known as Wallacea.

The Wakatobi is also home to Operation Wallacea, a UK based for non-profit conservation group looking at sustainable development of fisheries and coral reef research. An independent non-commercial website [1] has been set up about the marine park. This website contains tourist and travel information about the wakatobi, with additional resources about the biodiversity, conservation and local people.
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Ende
Ende
Ende, Nusa Tenggara Timur, ID
Ende was the site of a kingdom that existed around the end of 18th century. For many decades Ende has been a center of government, trade, education, and political activities.

In 1934, the nationalist leader, Soekarno, who later became Indonesia's first president was exiled to Ende by the Dutch colonial government.
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Labuan Bajo
Labuan Bajo
Flores
A fishing village, W end of Flores. Also is the ferry port connecting to Sapa, Sumbawa island. This is the best place to explore Komodo Rinca islands to see Komodo Dragons. It is also one of the best place for diving.
All facilities are located along the main road along the coast.
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Nagekeo
Nagakeo
I'm not sure exactly where Nagekeo is located.
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Mataram
Mataram
Mataram Indonesian:Kota Mataram is an independent city carved out of Lombok Barat Regency on the west side of the island of Lombok, Indonesia. It is the capital and largest city of West Nusa Tenggara province, and has a population of around 342,896 (estimated in 2005).
Three towns constitute the Mataram area; from west to east, these are Ampenan, Mataram, and Cakranegara. They are distinct towns, but run together. Broadly, Ampenan is an aging port city, Mataram is the governmental and office center for the province, and Cakranegara is the major commercial center on the island.
Mataram was also the seat of power for the king of Mataram (Seraja), which was sometimes controlled through neighboring Singaraja, Bali.
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Bali
Bali
Bali is the westernmost of the Lesser Sunda Islands, lying between Java to the west and Lombok to the east. It is one of the country's 33 provinces with the provincial capital at Denpasar towards the south of the island.

With a population recorded as 3,151,000 in 2005, the island is home to the vast majority of Indonesia's small Hindu minority. 93.18% of Bali's population adheres to Balinese Hinduism, while most of the remainder follow Islam. It is also the largest tourist destination in the country and is renowned for its highly developed arts, including dance, sculpture, painting, leather, metalworking and music.
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KUMAI
Kumai, Kalimantan Tengah
Kumai River The world famous attraction here is is the facilty where Orangutangs are reintroduced into the wild. Other cruisers in past years have described their visit here as one of the highlights of their stay in Indonesia.
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Belitung
Belitung
Belitung, formerly known as Billiton, is an island on the east coast of Sumatra, Indonesia in the Java Sea. The island is known for its pepper and for its tin. It was in the possession of the British from 1812 until the British ceded control of the island to the Dutch in the Anglo-Dutch Treaty of 1824. Its main town is Tanjung Pandan.
http://www.belitungisland.com
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Batam
Batam, Riau
Our last port in Indonesia.
Batam is an island and city in Riau Islands Province, known for its free trade zone area as part of the Sijori Growth Triangle, is located 20 km (12.5 miles) off Singapore's south coast. The 715 km² (276 miles²) island has a population of 919,449 (Des 2008).

The official language on the island is Indonesian, but due to the sizeable Chinese population, Chinese languages including Teochew, Hokkien and Mandarin are also spoken.
Photo of the ferry terminal from http://www.traveljournals.net
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Singapore
Singapore
Officially the Republic of Singapore, is an island city-state located at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, lying 137 kilometres (85 mi) north of the equator, south of the Malaysian state of Johor and north of Indonesia's Riau Islands. At 710.2 km2 (274.2 sq mi), Singapore, a microstate and the smallest nation in Southeast Asia, is by orders of magnitude larger than Monaco, San Marino, Andorra and Vatican City, the only other surviving sovereign city-states.

Before European settlement, the island now known as Singapore was the site of a Malay fishing village at the mouth of the Singapore River. Several hundred indigenous Orang Laut people also lived along the nearby coast, rivers and on smaller islands. In 1819, the British East India Company, led by Sir Stamford Raffles, established a trading post on the island, which was used as a port along the spice route. Singapore became one of the most important commercial and military centres of the British Empire, and the hub of British power in Southeast Asia.

During the Second World War, the British colony was occupied by the Japanese after the Battle of Singapore, which Winston Churchill called "Britain's greatest defeat". Singapore reverted to British rule in 1945, immediately after the war. Eighteen years later, in 1963, the city, having achieved independence from Britain, merged with Malaya, Sabah, and Sarawak to form Malaysia. However, the merger proved unsuccessful, and, less than two years later, it seceded from the federation and became an independent republic within the Commonwealth of Nations on August 9, 1965. Singapore was admitted to the United Nations on September 21 of that year.

Since independence, Singapore's standard of living has risen dramatically. Foreign direct investment and a state-led drive to industrialization based on plans drawn up by the Dutch economist Albert Winsemius have created a modern economy focused on industry, education and urban planning. Singapore is the 5th wealthiest country in the world in terms of GDP (PPP) per capita. In December 2008, the foreign exchange reserves of this small island nation stood at around US$174.2billion. The Singapore government had for the first time in history tapped into her official reserves and withdrew some S$4.9 billion with the approval of the President. The funds were then used as part of the S$20.5 billion resilience package unveiled by Finance Minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam on 5 February 2009. As of January 2009, Singapore's official reserves stands at US$170.3 billion.

In 2009, the Economist Intelligence Unit ranked Singapore the tenth most expensive city in the world in which to live—the third in Asia, after Tokyo and Osaka.

The population of Singapore is approximately 4.86 million.[4] Singapore is highly cosmopolitan and diverse with Chinese people forming an ethnic majority with large populations of Malay, Indian and other people. English, Malay, Tamil, and Chinese are the official languages.

Singapore is a parliamentary republic, and the Constitution of Singapore establishes representative democracy as the nation's political system. The People's Action Party (PAP) dominates the political process and has won control of Parliament in every election since self-government in 1959.
Source: Wikipedia
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Banjarmasin
Banjarmasin
Banjarmasin is the capital of South Kalimantan, Indonesia. It is located on a delta island near the junction of the Barito and Martapura rivers. As a result, Banjarmasin is sometimes called the "River City". Its population is about 444,000 (As of 1991).
www.pbase.com/image/53370774
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Karimun Jawa
Karimun, Losarang
Losarang, W Java
Karimunjawa is an archipelago of 69 islands in the Java Sea, Indonesia, 420 kilometres west of Jepara. The islands' name means 'a stone's throw from Java' in Javanese. The main island is also known as Karimun.
http://www.indonesia-expedition.com