L Labor Friends/Allies

ACORN

739 8th St SE
Washington, DC, 20003 US
Madhu Wijesize,
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Amalgamated Bank

202-721-0760
www.amalgamatedbank.com
The only majority owned labor union bank.
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APALA-DC Chapter

815 16th St NW
Washington, DC, 20006 US
Pafoua Lee, President
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Buzzard Point/ A rare industrial neighborhood of DC

This rather nondescript building currently houses the DC warehouse of Mo-tivate, the company that operates Capital Bikeshare. Behind this building, as you’ll see on our way out, is a salvage yard cooperative. The warehouse was originally located about a block to the east, wedged between a cement pro-cessing facility and PEPCO diesel generating plant which makes conversations like this inaudible on hot days when everyone in the city is drawing power for their air conditioners. Keep the image of this mixture of cement dust, diesel particulates and fumes from occasional incineration at the salvage yard in mind when we get to Foggy Bottom later, as it would have been many times worse in its heyday. This neighborhood of Buzzard Point is one of the last remaining industrial areas within District boundaries, and this one, too, will disappear, as we are standing on what will become the bleachers of the new DC United soccer stadium in a few years.
Recent bicycle industry organizing
In 2012, employees working for Alta Bicycle Share, the company that then operated Capital Bikeshare, discovered in the company’s contract with the Dis-trict Department of Transportation, that they were supposed to have been get-ting paid a federally-mandated prevailing wage with benefits. With the help of the Employment Justice Center, they made a claim with the Department of Labor, and the case is still ongoing (some current and former workers have been given back pay, but there has not been a full settling of accounts).
Last year, after Alta workers with the CitiBike system in New York City won union recognition, and driven by mounting concerns over job security, arbitrary discipline, safety and other issues, Capital Bikeshare workers also decided to organize with TWU Local 100, followed shortly thereafter by their colleagues in Boston and Chicago. At the same time, the company was in the process of being taken over by a group of hyper-wealthy real estate and “lifestyle indus-tries” investors in New York. While previous management had decided to voluntarily recognize the union in New York, the new owners were vehemently against unionization and retained the services of notorious union busters Jack-son Lewis. Workers in DC, Boston and Chicago ultimately prevailed, however, with those in DC voting 75% for the union, with 90% turnout.
Contract negotiations are ongoing, and concerns remain that the new owners plan to use Capital Bikeshare as a vehicle for latter-day “urban renewal” (more on that in the next stop) and real-estate profiteering.
- Fhar Miess
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CASA de MD

734 University Blvd E
Silver Spring, MD, 20903 US
Gustavo Torres, Exec Dir
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CBTU DC

501 3rd St NW
Ste 1124
Washington, DC, 20001 US
Gwend Johnson, President
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DC Employment Justice Center

727 15th St NW
Washington, DC, 20005-2101 US
Melvina Ford, Executive Director
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FAST/RAA

1420 K St NW Ste 300
Washington, DC, 20005 US
Michael Murphy,
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Gray Panthers of Metropolitan Washington

5309 Iroquois Rd
Bethesda, MD, 20816 US
Joseph Flynn, Recording Secretary
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Jewish Labor Committee

1816 Chestnut St
Philadelphia, PA, 19103 US
Rosalind Spigel, Acting Director
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Jews United for Justice

1413 K St NW
5th Floor
Washington, DC, 20001 US
Jacob Feinspan, Executive Director
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National Employment Law Project

1333 H St NW
Suite 300, East Tower
Washington, DC, US
www.nelp.org
Promotes policies and programs that create good jobs, strengthen upward mobility, enforce hard-won worker rights, and help unemployed workers regain their economic footing through improved benefits and services.
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Progressive Maryland

8720 Georgia Ave Ste 500
500
Silver Spring, MD, 20910 US
Sean Dobson, Executive Director
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L Labor Struggles/History

1,000 Sandwiches (1932)

1423 Pennsylvania Ave NW
(now the Willard Hotel)
Washington, DC, US
Once the site of Childs Restaurant, which was paid an unusual visit by one of Washington's wealthiest women, Evalyn Walsh McLean, owner of the Hope Diamond. Appalled by the condition of the Bonus Army (see markers for Bonus Expeditionary Force) in June 1932, Mrs McLean was walking among them when, as she reported in her autobiography 'Father Struck It Rich," she turned to the chief of police [Glassford, after whom the marchers named one of their encampments] after he announced he was going to get coffee for them and said "All right, I am going to Childs." As she retold it, "It was two o'clock (in the morning)...a man came up to take my order, "Do you serve sandwiches? I want a thousand," I said. "And a thousand packages of cigarettes...I want them right away. I haven't got a nickel with me, but you can trust me. I am Mrs. McLean." The sandwiches and cigarettes were delivered. After this McLean obtained a tent for the marchers to use as their headquarters and bought cots for the women and children to sleep on. She was most upset by the hunger among the marchers and went as far as calling Vice President Charles Curtis to demand that something be done.
- Douglass E. Evelyn & Paul Dickson in "On This Spot; Pinpointing the Past in Washington, DC" (pp 70-71)
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1st Boycott in DC (1834)

423 G St NW
Washington, DC, US
Columbia Typographical Society boycott against Gen. Duff Green, editor of the United States Telegraph, who brought in non-union printers and two-third apprentices. Boycotts are now a popular pressure tactic used by all sorts of groups and causes but they were first invented and widely used by labor unions in the 1800s. Washington's first boycott took place in 1834, declared by the Columbia Typographical Society against Gen. Duff Green, editor of the United States Telegraph. Green had brought in non-union printers and apprentices, precipitating not only the boycott but a 3-year strike.
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1st DC use of Taft-Hartley Act (1947)

1101 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
Temporary Restraining Order issued by District Court Chief Justice Bolitha J. Laws against United Office & Professional Workers of America (CIO) who were picketing Arthur Murray dance studio for refusing to negotiate a contract with his dancing teachers
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1st successful 8-hr strike/Navy Yard strikes

Navy Yard, Washington, DC
Washington, DC, US
Federal employees conducted 1st successful strike anywhere for 8 hr day.

Back on the northwest shore of the river sits the Washington Navy Yard, which saw a great strike for a ten-hour day that began on July 31st, 1835. Strikes effected most Federal Navy Yards during this year, and coincided in Philadelphia with a General Strike. Many of the strikes were inspired by the “10 Hour Circular”, produced by artisans in Boston, and which spread down the coast. During the strike at Washington Navy Yard, three-quarters of the men employed at the Yard walked out.

“Snow Storm” riots
The strike very much had a darker side, however, as it coincided with what came to be known as the “Snow Storm” race riot that stretched into early Au-gust, so named because the riot eventually came to target Beverly Snow, a well-known Black restaurateur. In the context of a public backlash against the growing popularity of abolitionist sentiment, the strike took on a notably racial dimension. According to Michael Shiner, a Black slave leased out to the Navy Yard by his master, part of the impetus for the strike was that Isaac Hull, Commandant of the Yard (and already much-disliked by the men of the Yard), had hired a crew of Black caulkers from Baltimore to work on a frigate being constructed there. Some accounts claim that the white workers felt that the caulkers were being brought in to break their already-planned strike, while others cite a more basic jealousy that the free Blacks were getting the good paying jobs.
Indeed, in 1838, Baltimore’s Black caulkers formed a Caulkers Association, a true labor organization that successfully bargained with Baltimore’s shipyard owners. “Caulkers were paid very well and were seldom refused wage increas-es since the Association monopolized the market,” wrote Bettye C. Thomas in the Journal of Negro History (1974). “They were also able to dictate the condi-tions under which they would work.” Among those Baltimore caulkers in the mid 1830s was one Frederick Douglass.
- Fhar Miess
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African American Industrial Workers Historic Homes

Foggy Bottom was the home of many industrial operations in the 19th & 20th centuries. Foggy Bottom was the home of three breweries, six oil refineries, warehouses and an array of small to medium manufacturing shops, blacksmiths and craft artisans. A short walk down one of these historic streets reveals small, thin, short houses that were the mainstay home of industrial workers and especially a large population of African American workers. Alley life is an important sociological phenomenon in DC and is reflected in the Snow's Court, Queen Anne's Court and Hughes Mews which were once thriving alley communities for poor Blacks and immigrants. As Jim Crow segregation began to decline after World War II, African Americans eventually moved out of these homes into other DC neighborhoods. Today, a few Black families still live in the neighborhood that has now become gentrified with the current historic and quaint homes.- "Walking the Spirit of Black Foggy Bottom," Bernard Demczuk, PhD., Sept 2011
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Bonus Expeditionary Force (Camp Glassford) 1932

401 Constitution Ave NW
Washington, DC, United States
"In the Spring of 1932, as America's Great Depression deepened, 20,000 out of work WW1 veterans descended on the nation's capital to demand immediate payment of bonuses. While most marchers set up camp in Anacostia, over 1,000 squatted in abandoned buildings along Pennsylvania Avenue near the Capitol. The site was dubbed "Camp Glassford" after DC Police Chief Glassford, a retired Brigadier General who arranged the use of the buildings (which were in the process of being torn down to make room for the National Gallery of Art and the Federal Trade Commission) and sent bedding and food to the Bonus marchers, many of whom were accompanied by their wives and children. Although the House of Representatives approved payment of the bonus, the Senate voted against it. When Congress adjourned, the Federal government -- led by General Douglas McArthur and Major Dwight D. Eisenhower -- moved aggressively to evict the unarmed veterans, using teargas, tank, cavalry and bayonet-wielding troops to clear Camp Glassford, reducing the area to smoking rubble. Two veterans shot dead by the troops are buried in Arlington National Cemetery. Camp Marks in Anacostia, was similarly attacked and burned (an event that echoes back to the British sacking in 1814 and forward to 1968 when the city once again burned in the aftermath of the assassination of Martin Luther King)."
- New York Magazine (no date; from Bonus VF)
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Bonus Expeditionary Force (Camp Marks) 1932

Anacostia Dr SE
Washington, DC, US
(exact location TBD) Most of the 20,000 Bonus Marchers -- broke and starving WW1 veterans and their families -- who arrived in Washington in 1932 stayed in camp Marks, a shantytown that rose on the Anacostia flats, described by John Dos Passos as "built out of old newspapers, cardboard boxes, packing crates, bits of tin or tarpaper roofing, old shutters, every kind of cockeyed makeshift shelter from the rain scraped together out of the city dump." Marchers spent most of their time protesting in front of the Capitol, returning to Camp Marks or Camp Glassford (see 24) to eat, sleep and listen to speeches, like one Dos Passos reports from "a tall scrawny man with deeply sunken cheeks": "Here's a plant that can turn out everything every man, woman and child in this country needs, from potatoes to washing machines, and it's broken down because it can't give the fellow who does the work enough money to buy what he needs with. Give us the money and we'll buy their bread and their corn and beans and their electric iceboxes and their washing machines and their radios. We ain't holding out on 'em because we don't want those things. Can't get a job to make enough money to buy 'em, that's all." After their petition to Congress was denied, the veterans were evicted. In an attack led by general Douglas MacArthur, Camp Marks was burned to the ground (photo).
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Bonus Expeditionary Force Martyrs Hushka & Carlson (1932)

Arlington National Cemetery
Fort Myer, VA, United States
WW1 veterans William J. Hushka and Eric Carlson, killed when Eisenhower & McArthur cleared out the Bonus Expeditionary Force (Bonus Army); see also Bonus Expeditionary Force (Camp Marks), Bonus Expeditionary Force U.S. Capitol Protest & Bonus Expeditionary Force (Camp Glassford).

DIRECTIONS: Best bet is to go to the Visitor Information Center and ask for a map to graves 2262 and 5217 in Section 18; then you can walk in (about 20 min) or drive (5 min) and they'll give you a free parking pass and visitor's pass for your car, which is required, and follow the directions on the map.

SPECIFIC DIRECTIONS: follow Eisenhower Drive, go right on Porter, left on Grant and left on Clayton; this is Section 18. To find HUSHKA, look on the West side on Clayton for Row D1, which begins with Francis J. Schmitz; Hushka is the 8th grave back. To find CARLSON, look on the East side of Clayton for the row which begins with James A Latham; Carlson is the 17th grave.

HUSHKA, WILLIAM J; PVT 1ST CL CO I 41ST INF US ARMY
Date of Death: 07/28/1932
Grave location: Section 18, Grave 2262

CARLSON, ERIC; PVT 1ST CL HDQRT CO 76TH FLD ART
Date of Death: 08/02/1932
Grave Location: Section 18; Grave 5217
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Bonus Expeditionary Force U.S. Capitol Protest (1932)

Independence Ave SW & 1st St SW
Washington, DC, US
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C & O Canal

1057 Thomas Jefferson St NW
Washington, DC, United States
Built by black and Irish laborers who organized themselves and solved many unforeseen and unique engineering challenges in building this great public works, using their trade skills where the credited designers were unable to proceed. (Peter Winch)
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Coxey's Army Camp Stevens (1894)

Hamilton St NW
Washington, DC, 20011 US
At this location Coxey's Army camped April 29-31, 1894 on the grounds of what was then Brightwood Riding Park. They had marched 400 miles on foot from Ohio in 35 days, on their way to protest the effects of a severe economic depression. As Coxey declaimed, "Congress takes two years to vote on anything if left to itself. Twenty-millions of people are hungry and cannot wait two years to eat."
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Coxey's Army Confrontation at U.S. Capitol (1894)

Independence Ave SW & 1st St SW
Washington, DC, US
SE corner of U.S. Capitol: At the height of a serious economic depression in 1894, bands of unemployed workers formed "industrial armies" which headed for Washington to demand various reforms. Coming from Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, Denver, Chicago, Boston and the midwest, the "Commonwealers," as they called themselves, rode seized trains and converged on Washington in April and May. The largest contingent, led by "General" Jacob Coxey, having marched on foot most of the way from Ohio, entered the District on April 29, 1894 and established Camp George Washington. Cheered by thousands of onlookers, on May 1, 1894, Coxey's Army marched seven miles down 14th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue to the Capitol where Coxey was arrested while trying to speak and many of his unarmed followers were beaten by police, many of whom charged the crowd on mounted horses. "Clubbing...will not drive thought out of people's minds," Coxey told AFL head Samuel Gompers, "a club will subdue one man, but it will recruit one hundred for the cause." Following this confrontation, the workers remained in the District through most of the summer, camped at various sites, including Camp Tyranny (see 53).
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Coxey's Army: Camp Tyranny (1894)

Washington Ave SW & 1st St SW
Washington, DC, US
Following their confrontation with police at the Capitol on May 1, 1894 -- in which their leader was arrested and many of the marchers beaten by police -- Coxey's followers set up "Camp Tyranny" at the site of a cleaned-up dump. They remained here for two weeks, drilling, protesting and playing baseball, until the camp was closed in mid-May by public health officials. The "Commonwealers" then moved on to a succession of camps in Hyattsville, Bladensburg (MD) and Roslyn (VA) before they were eventually driven out by militia on August 11.
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Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge

Anacostans
From this vantage point, you can get a sweeping view of the river once re-ferred to as the Eastern Branch of the Potowmac River, and which we now refer to as the Anacostia. The southeast shore of this river was once home to a thriving native american trading center, visited by traders all up and down the east coast. They were referred to by white settlers as Anacostans, an angli-cized version of Nacotchtank, meaning “at the trading town”. Only 60 years after their first contact with Europeans, with their numbers greatly depleted by Eurasian infectious diseases to which they had no immunity, they relocated to Anacostine Island, which we now refer to as Roosevelt Island. Their remnants and descendents likely merged with the Piscataway.
Camp Marks
Also on the southeast shore, most of the 20,000 Bonus Marchers—broke and starving WWI veterans and their families—who arrived in Washington in 1932 stayed in camp Marks, a shantytown that rose on the Anacostia flats, described by John Dos Passos as “built out of old newspapers, cardboard boxes, packing crates, bits of tin or tarpaper roofing, old shutters, every kind of cock-eyed makeshift shelter from the rain scraped together out of the city dump.” Marchers spent most of their time protesting in front of the Capitol, returning to Camp Marks or Camp Glassford to eat, sleep and listen to speeches, like one Dos Passos reports from “a tall scrawny man with deeply sunken cheeks”: “Here’s a plant that can turn out everything every man, woman and child in this country needs, from potatoes to washing machines, and it’s broken down be-cause it can’t give the fellow who does the work enough money to buy what he needs with. Give us the money and we’ll buy their bread and their corn and beans and their electric iceboxes and their washing machines and their radios. We ain’t holding out on ‘em because we don’t want those things. Can’t get a job to make enough money to buy ‘em, that’s all.” After their petition to Congress was denied, the veterans were evicted. In an attack led by general Douglas MacArthur, Camp Marks was burned to the ground.
- Fhar Miess
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Justice for Janitors block DC bridges (1996)

14th Street Bridge
Justice for Janitors bridge occupation
The bridge just ahead of us is the Theodore Roosevelt Bridge. During a week of actions near the end of September, 1995, activists with Justice for Jan-itors engaged in a series of actions to protest DC budget cuts that would ad-versely effect working families in the district. On September 20th, activists loaded up into 3 buses at Justice for Janitors headquarters on K St. and drove around the city, being followed by MPD. A fourth bus evaded surveillance by departing from Virginia and drove onto the Roosevelt Bridge and parked diag-onally across it, blocking all four lanes. It was part of a larger campaign that used traffic disruptions as a tactic to shut down business-as-usual in the district (and indeed throughout the country) during 1994–1995. Earlier in the week, Justice for Janitors activists had shut down the 3rd Street Tunnel, and that spring, they had shut down the 14th St. Bridge. Their actions were effective enough that they prompted a congressional hearing on the matter in October of 1995.
On June 15, 1990, striking janitors and their supporters held a peaceful march and demonstration in LA’s Century City district. As the protest got underway, 400 striking janitors fighting to win a union to build a better life for their families found themselves squaring off against fifty baton wielding police officers - when the workers linked arms to cross the street, they were beat back by dozens of police officers, and thir-ty-eight of the wounded marchers were arrested; photo courtesy SEIU

Anacostine island
Out in the middle of the Potomac, you can see Anacostine island, so named for the small settlement of the remaining Anacostan tribe who relocated there, only 60 years after their first contact with Europeans, with their numbers greatly depleted by Eurasian infectious diseases to which they had no immunity. The island is now referred to as Roosevelt Island.
- Fhar Miess
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March on Washington (1941)

(Randolph); Foner OLBW, 239-41
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March on Washington for Jobs & Freedom (1963)

(Randolph,Reuther): Foner (OLBW,346-9)
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Medical Center (1952)

1001 4th St Nw
Washington, DC, 20001-2516 US
Doctors join hands with labor unions to operate a medical center; sends Negro patients into private offices of doctors, regardless of race or color. (12/10/1952)
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Palmer Raids: House of Attorney General A. Mitchell Palmer

In 1919, 2123 R Street NW was home to the Attorney General of the United States Alexander Mitchell Palmer and his family. On June 2, the house was bombed by Italian anarchist Carlo Valdonoci, who was influenced by the writ-ings of Luigi Galleani. Sacco and Vanzetti were also known to be ‘Galleanists’ and were influenced by this same school of thought. The bomb exploded prem-aturely and Attorney General Palmer and his family were uninjured in the blast. The explosion shattered the front of the house and blew out windows in the surrounding neighborhood, including those in the home of then Asst. Secretary of the Navy, Franklin D. Roosevelt, who lived across the street. Valdonoci was killed in the premature explosion.
On the same day, bombs went off in several other American cities, in what would comprise and become collectively known as the 1919 United States an-archist bombings, that fed the red scare of 1919–1920. In April of the same year, a mail bomb had been intercepted and defused before it reached Mr. Palmer. Later in 1919 Palmer would go on to lead the Palmer Raids against radical leftists in the country which resulted in the arrest of 10,000 people, 3,500 of whom were held by authorities in detention; in total 556 immigrants were eventually deported under the Immigration Act of 1918, including famous an-archists Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman.
There were 7 other bombs delivered on the same day as this one. They all were delivered with several copies of a pink flyer, titled “Plain Words,” that read:
“War, Class war, and you were the first to wage it under the cover of the powerful institutions you call order, in the darkness of your laws. There will have to be bloodshed; we will not dodge; there will have to be murder: we will kill, because it is necessary; there will have to be destruction; we will destroy to rid the world of your tyrannical institutions.”
- Fhar Miess
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Resurrection City

1455 Pennsylvania Ave NW
D.C., DC, 20004 US
In this space, which was at the time a grassy field, starting on May 21st, 1968, thousands of people constructed a shantytown called “Resurrection City” as part of the Poor People’s Campaign of Martin Luther King’s SCLC shortly after his assassination. The campaign was organized to push for an Economic Bill of Rights. Thousands of people lived in Resurrection City and in some ways it resembled other cities. Gordon Mantler writes: “Resurrection City also became a community with all of the tensions that any society contains: hard work and idleness, order and turmoil, punishment and redemption. Businesses flourished inside the tent city’s walls, as did street crime. Older men informally talked politics while playing checkers or having their hair cut; others argued in more formal courses and workshops.” There were unusual problems but there was also unusual dignity. Residents called it “the city where you don’t pay tax-es, where there’s no police brutality and you don’t go to jail.” Resurrection City had its own zip code, a university, a “Soul Tent”, a psychiatrist, and a city hall. It lasted for 6 weeks.
- Fhar Miess
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Solidarity Day (1981)

9/19/1981: 250,000 protested Reagan's firing of PATCO air traffic controllers; the demo was the largest in 20 years
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Southwest Waterfront “Urban Renewal”

The Southwest Waterfront is one of DC’s oldest—and new-est—neighborhoods. For 150 years, this was a working waterfront communi-ty. “Urban renewal” changed the landscape forever. Today, Southwest is a virtual library of Modernist architecture of the 1960s with a few historic struc-tures, some of which go all the way back to the section’s beginnings.
In the 1950s New York developers Webb and Knapp put their ideas for Ur-ban Renewal into a formal plan for a new Southwest, the nation’s first full-scale urban renewal project. Architects Harry Weese and I.M. Pei envisioned a 10th Street Mall linking the National Mall to a rebuilt waterfront and a residential area serving 4,000 families of varying incomes. Offices, hotels, restaurants and shops would line the new mall. A major cultural and entertainment center would complete the picture.
While most of the residential buildings materialized, Webb and Knapp never completed the Tenth Street Mall, and the cultural center was built instead in Foggy Bottom (today’s Kennedy Center). Nevertheless, the brand new resi-dential areas, so convenient to the federal core, attracted middle-class govern-ment workers as well as members of Congress and their staffers.
“We thought we were urban pioneers,” recalled journalist Neal Peirce. “We were moving back to the center city and were quite idealistic…. We wanted to make Southwest a model….” The new Southwest housed Hubert Humphrey and Sandra Day O’Connor, among others. Some low-income former residents were able to return, but most were displaced, casting a shadow on the urban renewal ideal.
The neighborhood is being totally remade once again, with the massive re-development of the waterfront itself that you’ll see on the way to our next stop, in addition to building of a new soccer stadium. Both are likely to severely impact what remains of the low-income housing in the neighborhood, such as the St. James Mutual Homes we just passed on P Street.
- Fhar Miess
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The Pearl Incident

The Pearl Incident in 1848 was the largest recorded nonviolent escape at-tempt by slaves in United States history. On the evening of April 15, 1848, in the gathering dark, 77 men and women slipped aboard the schooner Pearl, waiting near the current wharves up the Washington Channel. Captain Daniel Dray-ton had agreed to sail them south on the Potomac and then north to freedom via the Chesapeake Bay. But the bad weather forced the Pearl to anchor just short of the Chesapeake Bay. Meanwhile, someone—many later said a jilted suitor of escapee Emily Edmonson—tipped of the slave owners.
The Pearl was apprehended and its passengers and crew were brought back to the Seventh St. Wharf. They were marched in chains to jail near Judiciary Square as mobs jeered. Drayton later wrote, “it seemed as if the time for the lynching had come.” Enraged whites rioted for three days, attacking offices of the National Era, an abolitionist newspaper they associated with the escape attempt. Unharmed, the enslaved were all sold South. Edmonson’s father raised the money to buy the freedom of Emily and her sister Mary, and the sis-ters went on to campaign for abolition. Emily eventually returned to the DC area, where her descendants still live.
- Fhar Miess
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White House Labor Civil Disobedience over deaths of El Salvador labor leaders (1989)

1600 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC, United States
18 protestors were arrested when they blocked a gate to the White House during a protest over deaths of labor leaders in El Salvador. Among those arrested were Michael Urquhart, president of the American Federation of Government Employees Local 12, mark Simon, President of the Montgomery County Education Association and Maryland Del. Paul G. Pinsky (D., Pr. George’s).
- item submitted by Saul Schniderman
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I Union Hotels

Beacon Hotel

1615 Rhode Island Avenue, NW
Washington, DC, 20036 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Best Western Capitol Skyline Hotel

10 I St SW
Washington, DC, US
202-488-7500
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Capital Hilton The

1001 16th Street NW
Washington, DC, United States
202-393-1000
UNITE HERE 25: 202-737-2225
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Convention Center Embassy Suites

900 10th Street, NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Donovan House: DO NOT PATRONIZE!

Boycotted by UNITE HERE 25
1155 14th St NW
Washington, DC 20005
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Doubletree Hotel Crystal City-National Airport

300 Army Navy Drive
Arlington, VA, United States
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Dupont Circle Hotel: DO NOT PATRONIZE!

1500 New Hampshire Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
HOTELS (UNITE HERE 25: 202-737-2225)
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Embassy Suites Hotel Crystal City National Airport

1300 Jefferson Davis Hwy
Arlington, VA, United States
UNITE HERE Local 25 ( 202-737-2225)
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Fairfax Embassy Row

2100 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
UNITE HERE 25: 202-737-2225
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Harrington Hotel

436 11th Street, NW
Washington, DC, 20004 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Hay Adams Hotel

800 16th St NW
Washington, DC, 20006 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Hilton Crystal City at National Airport

2399 Jefferson Davis Highway
Arlington, VA, 22202 US
UNITE HERE Local 25 (202-737-2225)
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Hilton Washington Embassy Row

2015 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC, 20036 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Holiday Inn – Georgetown

2101 Wisconsin Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20007 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Hyatt Regency Washington

400 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Jefferson Hotel

1200 16th St NW
Washington, DC, US
UNITE HERE 25: 202-737-2225
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Liason Hotel

415 New Jersey Ave., NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Loews' L'Enfant Plaza

480 L'Enfant Plaza
Washington, DC, 20024 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Madison Hotel

Fifteenth & M Streets NW
Washington, DC, 20005 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Mandarin Oriental Hotel

1330 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC, 20024 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Marriott Marquis

901 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington DC 20001
District of Columbia
(202) 824-9200

UNITE HERE 25: 202-737-2225
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Marriott Wardman Park

2660 Woodley Road, NW
Washington, DC, 20008 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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McLean Hilton Tysons Corner

7920 Jones Branch Drive
McLean, VA, United States
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Omni Shoreham Hotel

2500 Calvert Street NW
Washington, DC, 20008 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Phoenix Park Hotel

520 North Capitol Street, NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Renaissance Mayflower Hotel

1127 Connecticut Avenue NW
Washington, DC, 20036 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Sheraton Four Points

1201 K Street, NW
Washington, DC, 20005 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
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Sheraton Premiere at Tyson's Corner

8661 Leesburg Pike
, 22182 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

St Regis Washington

923 16th and K Streets, NW
Washington, DC, US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

W Washington, DC Hotel

515 15th St, NW
Washington, DC 20004
202-638-5900
www.wwashingtondc.com
Union: UNITE HERE 25
directions Directions

Walter E. Washington Convention Center

Unite Here 23
directions Directions

Washington Court Hotel

525 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Washington Hilton and Towers

1919 Connecticut Avenue NW
Washington, DC, 20009 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Westin Fairfax Hotel

2100 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC, 20008 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Williamsburg Inn

300 E Francis St
Williamsburg, VA, United States
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Williamsburg Lodge & Conference Center

310 S England St
Williamsburg, VA, United States
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Williamsburg Woodlands Hotel & Conference Center

105 Visitor Center Dr
Williamsburg, VA, United States
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

I Union Restaurants

1919 Grill

1919 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC, United States
UNITE HERE Local 25
directions Directions

American History Museum cafes

Constitution Ave NW
DC, 20560 US
Stars and Stripes Café (Ground floor) (UNITE HERE 23)
11 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily* (may stay open later if visitor demand warrants extra hours)
Natural and sustainable foods including natural beef burgers, pizza, hot dogs, BBQ, Sandwiches, soups, salad bar, fountain and bottled beverages and desserts.

Constitution Café (1st Floor) (UNITE HERE 23)
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily; Open until 7 p.m. when the museum has extended hours.
Sandwiches, salads and soups made with natural and locally grown ingredients. Pastries, ice cream and specialty coffees, bottled sodas and water.
directions Directions

American Red Cross cafeteria

(UNITE HERE 23)
directions Directions

Anthem at Marriott Marquis

901 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Aquarelle At the Watergate

2650 Virginia Ave NW
Washington, DC, United States
202-298-4455
UNITE HERE Local 25
directions Directions

Article One Lounge at Hyatt Regency

400 New Jersey Avenue NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Belvedere Lobby Bar at Gaylord National

201 Waterfront St
Fort Washington, MD, 20744 US
directions Directions

Bistro 525 at the Washington Court

525 New Jersey Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
directions Directions

Bistro Ondines

2399 Jefferson Davis Hwy
Arlington, VA, 22202 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Cafe and Grill

525 New Jersey Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Cafe Promenade

Renaissance Mayflower Hotel, 1127 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC, United States
202-347-2233
UNITE HERE Local 25
directions Directions

Cafes at the National Museum of the American Indian

Mitsitam Café (UNITE HERE 23)
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Limited menu after 3 p.m. off season)
Visit the Mitsitam Café website
"Mitsitam" means "Let's Eat!" in the Native language of the Delaware and Piscataway peoples. The café enhances the museum experience by offering Native-inspired cuisines from five regions of the Western Hemisphere, including the Northern Woodlands, South America, the Northwest Coast, Meso America and the Great Plains.Tamales, roasted turkey, grilled salmon, homemade seasonal soups, buffalo burgers, Indian fry bread, a seasonal variety of aqua fresca and desserts.

Mitsitam Espresso Bar (UNITE HERE 23)
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Pastries and casual fare from the cafe’s repertoire, plus Tribal Grounds Coffee—organic, fair-trade coffee grown by indigenous farmers and imported, roasted, and provided to the museum by the Eastern Band of Cherokee.
directions Directions

Cafes at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

Atrium Café (Ground Floor) (UNITE HERE 23)
Monday-Friday: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Open until 5 p.m. when the museum has extended hours.
Natural and sustainable foods including BBQ beef brisket, rotisserie chicken, burgers, pizza, hot dogs, gourmet sandwiches, house-prepared soups, fresh salads, organic fruit, bottled and fountain beverages, and homemade desserts.

Café Natural (Ground Floor) (UNITE HERE 23)
Daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Open until 7 p.m. when the museum has extended hours.
Ice cream, homemade desserts, specialty coffees, gourmet sandwiches, and fresh salads.
directions Directions

Cannon HOB cafe

Cannon Cafe, Cannon B-114
Hours: In Session: Monday-Friday 7.30am-4.00pm
Out of Session: Closed
directions Directions

Capital Cafe

1919 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC, United States
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Castle Café

1000 Jefferson Dr SW
District of Columbia, DC, 20004 US
(UNITE HERE 23)
8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily
Specialty sandwiches, soups, pastries, organic salads, wraps, panini sandwiches, antipasti, organic coffee, espresso/cappuccino bar, teas, bottled beverages, beer, wine, and premium ice cream.
directions Directions

Charlie Palmer Steak House

101 Constitution Ave NW
Washington, DC, United States
directions Directions

CityZen

1330 Maryland Ave SW
Washington, DC, 20024 US
directions Directions

Courtside Café

550 1st St NW
Washington, DC, US
on the Georgetown Law campus; staffed by members of UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Decanter at St. Regis

923 16th St NW
Washington, DC, 20006 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Dignitary, The (Mariott Marquis)

901 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
Unite Here 25
directions Directions

Edgar Bar & Kitchen

1127 Connecticut Avenue NW
Washington, DC, 20036 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Finn & Porter Restaurant

900 10th Street NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Ford House Office Building cafes

UNITE HERE 23

Ford Cafe, Ford 125-135
Hours: In Session: Monday-Friday 7:30am - 2:30pm
Out of Session: Monday-Friday 7:30am - 2:30pm

Ford Carryout, Ford HOB
Hours: In Session: Monday-Friday 7:30am - 4:00pm
Out of Session: Monday-Friday: 9:00am - 4:00pm
directions Directions

GWU Marvin Center cafes

(UNITE HERE 23)
Coffee Stop (8a-2p M-F)
ZeBi (11a-2p M-F)
NON-UNION: Auntie Anne's, Bamboo, BONMi
directions Directions

GWU Pelham Commons at West Hall (student dining center)

2100 Foxhall Rd NW
DC, 20007 US
J-Dub Java, Zebis
Unite Here Local 23

2100 Foxhall Rd NW
George Washington University
Washington, DC 20007

Closed in the summer, re-opening in the Fall
http://gwcampusdining.com/dining/pelham.html
directions Directions

Harry's Pub

2660 Woodley Rd NW
Washington, DC, 20008 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

High Velocity

901 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Illy's at Marriott Wardman Park

2660 Woodley Rd NW
Washington, DC, 20008 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Indigo Landing Restaurant

1 Marina Dr
Alexandria, VA, United States
UNITE HERE Local 23
directions Directions

International Market Place (Embassy Row Hotel)

2015 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20036 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

James Madison Memorial Building (Library of Congress) cafes

Madison Café (LM 625, James Madison Memorial Building) (UNITE HERE 23)
Monday through Friday; Breakfast, 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.; Lunch, 11a.m. to 2p.m.
Limited Service, 10:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. & 2-3:30 p.m. Limited service is hot and cold beverages, made to order grill items and cold grab and go items.
“The full-length windows are worth the trip, showing off a view of the south side of the Capitol, with the Anacostia River curving around.”

Madison Snack Bar (LM G47, James Madison Memorial Building) (UNITE HERE 23)

Adams Snack Bar (LA 110) James Madison Memorial Building) (UNITE HERE 23)
Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
directions Directions

Jefferson Coffee Shop (Library of Congress)

(LJ Cellar Level) (UNITE Here 23)
Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
directions Directions

KC Cafe

2700 F St NW
Kennedy Center
Washington, DC, US
UNITE HERE Local 23
directions Directions

Lafayette, The (Hay Adams Hotel)

800 16th St NW
Washington, DC, 20006 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Longworth House Office Bldg Cafeterias

UNITE HERE 23

The Creamery, Longworth B-224A
Hours: In Session: Monday-Friday 7:30am - 5:00pm
Out of Session: Closes at 4:00pm.

C-Store, Longworth B-224B
Hours: In Session: Monday-Friday 9:00am - 6:00pm
Out of Session: Monday-Friday 9:00am - 4:00pm

Longworth Cafe, Longworth B-223
Hours: In Session: Monday-Friday 7:30am - 2:30pm
Out of Session: Monday-Friday 7:30am - 2:30pm
directions Directions

Marquee Lounge (Omni Shoreham Hotel)

2500 Calvert Street NW
Washington, DC, 20008 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Martin's Crosswinds

7400 Greenway Center Dr
Washington, DC, US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

McClellan’s Sports Bar at the Washington Hilton

1919 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20009 US
directions Directions

Monocle Restaurant

107 D St NE
Washington, DC, 20002 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Muze

1330 Maryland Ave SW
Washington, DC, 20024 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

National Gallery of Art cafes

UNITE HERE 23

Cascade Café
The Cascade Café, with a view of the cascade waterfall, offers soups, salads, specialty entrées, wood-fired pizzas, sandwiches, and a selection of fresh pastries and desserts.

Espresso & Gelato Bar
A full espresso bar offers 19 flavors of house-made gelato and a selection of fresh sandwiches, salads, pastries, and desserts.

The Garden Café provides a serene spot for lunch in the West Building next to the Ground Floor galleries.

Pavilion Café
With a panoramic view of the Sculpture Garden, the Pavilion Café offers specialty pizzas, sandwiches, salads, desserts, and assorted beverages.
directions Directions

National Pastime Sports Bar and Grill

201 Waterfront St
Fort Washington, MD, 20744 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

National Portrait Gallery Courtyard Cafe

UNITE HERE 23
11:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.* daily
Soups, made-to-order salads and salad bar, panini, sandwiches, bottled beverages, wine, beer, coffee, teas, pastries and ice cream.
directions Directions

North Gate Grill at Capital Hilton

1001 16th St NW
Washington, DC, 20036 US
directions Directions

Oasis

2399 Jefferson Davis Hwy
Arlington, VA, 22202 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Off The Record Bar (Hay Adams Hotel)

800 16th St NW
Washington, DC, 20006 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Old Hickory Steakhouse

201 Waterfront St
Fort Washington, MD, 20744 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

P.O.V. at the W Hotel

515 15th St NW
Washington, DC, 20004 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Park Promenade (Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill)

400 New Jersey Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Pienza Italian Market

201 Waterfront St
Fort Washington, MD, 20744 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Plume

1200 16th St NW
Washington, DC, 20036 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Rayburn House Office Bldg CAFES

UNITE HERE 23

Rayburn Cafe, Rayburn B-357
Hours: In Session: Monday-Friday 7:30am - 2.30pm
Out of Session: Closed

Rayburn Deli, Rayburn B-236
Hours: In Session Monday-Thursday 11.00am-6.00pm, Friday 5.00pm
Out of Session: Monday-Friday 7:30am - 2.30pm
directions Directions

Relish

2399 Jefferson Davis Hwy
Arlington, VA, 22202 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Robert's Restaurant

2500 Calvert St NW
Washington, DC, 20008 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Roof Terrace Restaurant

2700 F St NW
Kennedy Center
Washington, DC, United States
UNITE HERE Local 23
directions Directions

Rural Society (Madison Hotel)

1177 15th St NW
Washington, DC, 20005 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
(formerly PostScript)
directions Directions

Starbucks at the Marriott Marquis

901 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Statler Lounge at Capital Hilton

1001 16th St NW
Washington, DC, 20036 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Stone's Throw Restaurant and Bar

2660 Woodley Rd NW
Washington, DC, 20008 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

The Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf at the Washington Hilton

1919 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20009 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

The District Line at the Washington Hilton

1919 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20009 US
directions Directions

The Fourth Estate Restaurant

The Fourth Estate Restaurant is open to the public and serves stylish American food in the historic National Press Club. Executive chef Susan Delbert uses locally grown produce and meats for a menu that elevates taste above trendiness. The atmosphere is ideal for a meal with a source or a sweetheart.
Brunch Sat Seating from 11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Lunch Mon - Sat Seating from 11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Dinner Tues - Sat Seating from 5:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. (Saturday seating begins at 5:00 p.m.)
202-662-7638
http://press.org/fourthestate
Represented by Unite Here Local 25
directions Directions

The Greenhouse

1200 16th St NW
Washington, DC, 20036 US
directions Directions

The Lafayette at Hay Adams

800 16th St NW
Washington, DC, 20006 US
directions Directions

The Marketplace

600 New Jersey Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
on the Georgetown Law campus; staffed by members of UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Town & Country Bar (Renaissance Mayflower Hotel)

1127 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20036 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Twigs

1001 16th St NW
Washington, DC, 20036 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

Two Continents Restaurant

15th St & Pennsylvania
Washington, DC, 20003 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

United States Capitol cafes

UNITE HERE 23

Capitol Market, Capitol HB9
Open to the public
Hours: In Session: Monday-Thursday 7:30am -5:00pm
Friday 7:30am - 4:00pm
Out of Session: Closes at 3:30pm

Members' Dining Room, H-118
(by invitation of a Member of Congress)
Hours: In Session: Monday-Friday 8:00am - 2:30pm
Out of Session: Closed
directions Directions

US Dept of Agriculture Cafeteria

1400 Independence Ave SW
DC, 20250 US
(UNITE HERE 23)
Open to the public. Enter from C St and 9th St. SW
directions Directions

Woodley Market

2660 Woodley Rd NW
Washington, DC, 20008 US
directions Directions

Woodner, The

3636 16th Street, NW
Washington, DC, 20010 US
UNITE HERE Local 25: 202-737-2225
directions Directions

L Local union offices

1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers-East

611 N Eutaw St
Baltimore, MD, 21201 US
John Reid, Executive VP
directions Directions

ACE/AFSCME 2250

3231 Superior Ln
Suite A3
Bowie, MD, 20715 US
Richard Putney, Executive Director
directions Directions

AFGE 1000

609 H Street NE
Room 400
Washington, DC, 20002 US
Richard Campbell, President
directions Directions

AFGE 12

200 Constitution Ave NW Rm N-1501
Washington, DC, 20001 US
Alex Bastani, President
directions Directions

AFGE 2798

50 Irving St NW Rm GC100
Washington, DC, 20422-0001 US
Cleo Pennington, President
directions Directions

AFGE 2978

4200 Connecticut Ave
Bldg 44, A24
Washington, DC, 20008 US
JoAnn McCarthy, President
directions Directions

AFGE 3721

6930 Carroll Ave Ste 1040
Takoma Park, MD, 20912 US
Kenneth Lyons, President
directions Directions

AFGE 4055

441 G St NW, Rm 3M50
Washington, DC, 20001 US
Sherell Fersner, President
directions Directions

AFGE 476

451 7th St SW Rm 3143
Washington, DC, 20024 US
Eddie Eitches, President
directions Directions

AFGE Council 1

13607 Engleman Dr
Laurel, MD, 20708 US
Tom Murphy, President
directions Directions

AFGE District 14

80 F St NW Ste 804
Washington, DC, 20001 US
Dwight Bowman, National Vice President
directions Directions

AFM 161-710

4400 MacArthur Blvd NW
306
Washington, DC, 20007 US
John Cusick, President
directions Directions

AFSCME 1509

800 Independence Ave SW Rm 114
Washington, DC, 20024 US
Roy Robinson, President
directions Directions

AFSCME 1808

901 G St NW, Ste 206
Washington, DC, US
Anntoinette White-Richardson, President
directions Directions

AFSCME 2091

1724 Kalorama Rd NW Ste 200
Washington, DC, 20009 US
James Ivey, President
directions Directions

AFSCME 2401

1724 Kalorama Rd NW Ste 200
Washington, DC, 20009 US
Deborah Courtney, President
directions Directions

AFSCME 2462

1801 McCormick Dr Ste 160
Largo, MD, 20774 US
John Hawkins, President
directions Directions

AFSCME 2478

624 9th St NW Rm 504
Washington, DC, 20001-5301 US
Vanessa Williamson, Acting President
directions Directions

AFSCME 2743

941 N Capitol St NE
Ste 9400
Washington, DC, 20002 US
Cliff Deedrick, President
directions Directions

AFSCME 2921

1724 Kalorama Rd NW Ste 200
Washington, DC, 20009 US
Lucille Washington, President
directions Directions

AFSCME 2953

800 Independence Ave SW Rm 114
Washington, DC, 20024 US
William Chouinard, President
directions Directions

AFSCME 3097

950 Pennsylvania Ave NW Rm B-634
Washington, DC, 20004 US
Scott Fennimore, President
directions Directions

AFSCME 3389

3003 Hospital Dr
Room 053
Cheverly, MD, 20785 US
Thomas Colbert, President
directions Directions

AFSCME 3925

1400 Independence Ave SW
Washington, DC, US
Lauren Beatty, President
directions Directions

AFSCME 86

1410 Bush St
Ste A
Baltimore, MD, 21230 US
Archer Blackwell, Staff Representative
directions Directions

AFSCME COUNCIL 20

1724 Kalorama Rd NW Ste 200
Washington, DC, 20009 US
George Johnson, Executive Director
directions Directions

AFSCME COUNCIL 26

729 15th St NW Fl 7
Washington, DC, 20005-2101 US
Carl Goldman, Executive Director
directions Directions

AFSCME COUNCIL 67

1410 Bush St Ste 2
A
Baltimore, MD, 21230 US
Glenard Middleton Sr., Executive Director
directions Directions

AFSCME COUNCIL 92

190 W Ostend St Ste 101
Baltimore, MD, 21230 US
Sue Esty, Interim Executive Director
directions Directions

AFTRA/SAG Washington-Baltimore

7735 Old Georgetown Rd Ste 950
Bethesda, MD, 20814 US
Patricia O'Donnell, Executive Director
directions Directions

AGMA

16600 Shea Ln
Gaithersburg, MD, 20877 US
Eleni Kallas, National Dir. of Organizing and Training
directions Directions

ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL

6037 Baltimore Ave
Riverdale, MD, 20737 US
Paul Atwell, President
directions Directions

APWU, Nation's Capital and Southern MD Local

6139 Chillum Pl NE
Washington, DC, 20011 US
Dena Briscoe, President
directions Directions

ASASP

1300 Mercantile Ln Ste 144
Largo, MD, 20774 US
Doris Reed, Executive Director
directions Directions

ATU 689

2701 Whitney Pl
Forestville, MD, 20747 US
Jackie Jeter, President
directions Directions

Bakery Workers 118

9602 Martin Luther King Jr Hwy Ste B
Lanham, MD, 20706 US
Allen Haight, Business Mgr.
directions Directions

Boilermakers 193

1101 W Patapsco Ave
Baltimore, MD, 21227 US
Ernest Dorsey, Business Manager
directions Directions

CLUW

12116 N Keys Rd
Brandywine, MD, 20613 US
Brenda Savoy-Bushrod, Chapter President
directions Directions

CWA 101-12

4626 Wisconsin Ave NW Ste 200
Washington, DC, 20016 US
Robert Stevenson, President
directions Directions

CWA 2108

10782 Rhode Island Ave
Beltsville, MD, 20705 US
Les Evans, President
directions Directions

CWA 2222

4308 Evergreen Ln
Suite F
Annandale, VA, 22003 US
Stacie Adams, President
directions Directions

CWA 2300

6215 Greenbelt Rd Ste 206
Berwyn Heights, MD, 20740 US
Daisy Brown, President
directions Directions

CWA District 2

17000 Science Dr Ste 210
Bowie, MD, 20715 US
Ron Collins, Vice President
directions Directions

DCNA

5100 Wisconsin Ave NW Ste 306
Washington, DC, 20016 US
Herman Brown, Jr, Executive Director
directions Directions

FIRE FIGHTERS 1664

932 Hungerford Dr Ste 33A
Rockville, MD, 20850 US
John Sparks, President
directions Directions

FIRE FIGHTERS 36

2120 Bladensburg Rd NE Ste 210
Washington, DC, 20018 US
Dan Dugan, President
directions Directions

GCC/IBT 285-M

6210 N Capitol St NW
Washington, DC, 20011 US
Edward Williams, President
directions Directions

GCC/IBT 538-C

3318 20th St NE
Washington, DC, 20018 US
George Parrish, President
directions Directions

GPO Joint Council of Unions

732 N Capitol St NW Ste A-201
Washington, DC, 20001 US
George Lord, Chairman
directions Directions

IAM Capital Air Lodge 1759

1037 Sterling Rd
Fairfax County, VA, 20170 US
International Association of Machinists
1037 Sterling Rd #104
Herndon, VA 20170
703-318-8487; Fax: 703-318-9204
Email: jgrandestaff@mail.iam1759.org
Website: http://www.iam1759.org
Facebook: www.facebook.com/iam1759
Richard Pascarella, President
Major Employers: United Airlines, US Airways, Piedmont Airlines, British Airways, Southwest Airlines, and Alaska Airlines
directions Directions

IAM Lodge 193

2002 Dogwood Dr
Waldorf, MD, 20601 US
Allen Johnson, Secretary-Treasurer
directions Directions

IATSE 22

1810 Hamlin St NE
Washington, DC, US
directions Directions

IATSE 487

1414 Key Highway
Suite 201
Baltimore, MD, 21230 US
David Beach, President
directions Directions

IBEW 1200

9660 Marlboro Pk
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 US
Lillian Firmani, Business Manager
directions Directions

IBEW 1900

1300 Mercantile Ln Ste 202
Largo, MD, 20774 US
John Holt, President
directions Directions

IBEW 26

4371 Parliament Pl Ste A
Lanham, MD, 20706 US
Chuck Graham, Business Manager
directions Directions

IBEW 70

3606 Stewart Rd
Forestville, MD, 20747 US
Chris Brown, President
directions Directions

IFPTE 70

1611 Connecticut Ave NW Ste 400
Washington, DC, 20009 US
Heather Boushey, President
directions Directions

Insulators 24

901 Montgomery St
Laurel, MD, 20707 US
Lino Cressotti, Business Mgr.
directions Directions

Ironworkers 5

9100 Old Marlboro Pike
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 US
Kendall Martin, Business Manager
directions Directions

Ironworkers District Council

9001 Harford Rd Ste 2
Baltimore, MD, US
Buddy Cefalu
directions Directions

IUEC 10

9600 Martin Luther King Jr Hwy
Lanham, MD, 20706 US
Jimmy Demmel, Business Manager
directions Directions

IUOE 99

2461 Wisconsin Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20007 US
Michael Murphy, Business Mgr.
directions Directions

LABORERS 657

5201 1st Pl NE
Washington, DC, 20011 US
Anthony Frederick, Business Manager
directions Directions

Laborers Baltimore/Washington District Council

11951 Freedom Dr
Fairfax County, VA, 20190 US
Orlando Bonilla, Business Manager
directions Directions

Laborers' Local 11

3680 Wheeler Ave
VA, 22304 US
(703) 504-6167
Dennis Desmond, Business Manager
directions Directions

MAILERS (CWA 14-201) 29

9100 Old Marlboro Pk
Ste 100
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772 US
Mark B. Pullium, President
directions Directions

Metropolitan Washington Council, AFL-CIO

888 16th St NW
Suite 520
Washington, DC, US
202-974-8150
www.dclabor.org
directions Directions

NABET-CWA 31

962 Wayne Ave Ste 300
Silver Spring, MD, 20910 US
James Carl Mayers, President
directions Directions

NALC 142

6310 Chillum Pl NW
Washington, DC, 20011 US
Robert Harnest, Acting President
directions Directions

NEA/UDCFA

4200 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20008 US
Mohamed El-Khawas, President
directions Directions

NEWSPAPER GUILD 32-035

1100 15th St NW Ste 350
Washington, DC, 20005 US
Cetewayo Parks, Executive Director
directions Directions

NPCEU CEI

1320 G St SE
Washington, DC, 20003 US
Rochell Vaughan, President
directions Directions

NUHHCE/AFSCME 1199

729 15th St NW Fl 7
Washington, DC, 20005-2101 US
Ed Ford, Area Director
directions Directions

NWU/UAW 1981 2

1757 N St NW
Washington, DC, 20036 US
Jo Freeman,
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OPEIU 2

8455 Colesville Rd Ste 1250
Silver Spring, MD, 20910 US
Dan Dyer, President
directions Directions

PAINTERS AND ALLIED TRADES DISTRICT COUNCIL 51

4700 Boston Way Ste D
Lanham, MD, 20706 US
Timothy Edney, Business Mgr.
directions Directions

PLASTERERS' & CEMENT MASONS 891

1517 Kenilworth Ave NE
Washington, DC, 20019 US
Keith Hickman, Business Mgr.
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PLATE PRINTERS 2

14th & C Sts SW Rm 213-5A
Washington, DC, 97411 US
Dan Bradley, President
directions Directions

PLUMBERS 5

5891 Allentown Rd
Camp Springs, MD, 20746 US
John McKee, Business Manager
directions Directions

ROAD SPRINKLER FITTERS 669

7050 Oakland Mills Rd Ste 200
Columbia, MD, 21046 US
John Bodine, Business Manager
directions Directions

RODMEN 201

1507 Rhode Island Ave NE
Washington, DC, 20018 US
Kevin McVeigh, Business Mgr.
directions Directions

ROOFERS 30

2008 Merritt Ave
Baltimore, MD, 21222 US
Tom Pedrick, Business Mgr.
directions Directions

SCHOOL OFFICERS, COUNCIL OF 4

2120 Bladensburg Rd NE Ste 205
Washington, DC, 20018 US
Aona Jefferson, Acting President
directions Directions

SEIU 32BJ, District 82

1329 11th St NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
Jaime Contreras, District Chair and Supervisor
directions Directions

SEIU 400 PG

5132 Baltimore Ave
Hyattsville, MD, 20781 US
Carnell Reed, President
directions Directions

SEIU 500

901 Russell Ave Ste 300
300
Gaithersburg, MD, 20879 US
Merle Cuttitta, President
directions Directions

SEIU 722

1673 Columbia Rd NW Ste 100
Washington, DC, 20009 US
Daniel Fields, President
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SEIU MARYLAND/DC STATE COUNCIL

3700 Koppers St Ste 410
410
Baltimore, MD, 21227 US
Terry Cavanagh, Executive Director
directions Directions

Sheet Metal Workers 100

4725 Silver Hill Rd Ste 1
Suitland, MD, 20746 US
John Shields, Business Mgr.
directions Directions

TEAMSTERS 639

3100 Ames Pl NE
Washington, DC, 20018 US
Thomas Ratliff, President
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TEAMSTERS 730

2001 Rhode Island Ave NE
Washington, DC, 20018 US
Ritchie Brooks, President
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TEAMSTERS 96

2120 Bladensburg Rd NE Ste 106
Washington, DC, 20018 US
Michael S. Hampton, President
directions Directions

TEAMSTERS JOINT COUNCIL 55

2120 Bladensburg Rd NE Ste 102
Washington, DC, 20018 US
Ferline Buie, President
directions Directions

UFCW 400

4301 Garden City Dr Ste 400
Landover, MD, 20785 US
Mark Federici, President
directions Directions

UFCW/MCGEO 1994

600 S Frederick Ave Ste 200
Gaithersburg, MD, 20877 US
Gino Renne, President
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UNITE HERE 1071-02

1003 K St NW Ste 700
Washington, DC, 20001 US
Emil Abate, Assistant Director
directions Directions

UNITE HERE 14R

4909 Godfrey Ave
Alexandria, VA, 22309 US
Peter Sitnik, President
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UNITE HERE 25

1003 K St NW Ste 700
Washington, DC, 20001 US
John Boardman, Exec. Secretary-Treasurer
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UNITE HERE 7

7-9 W. Mulberry St W
Baltimore, MD, 21201 US
Roxie Herbekian, President
directions Directions

UNITE HERE Mid-Atlantic Regional Joint Board

7 -9 West Mulberry St
Baltimore, MD, 21201 US
Harold Bock, Regional Director
directions Directions

Washington Building Trades WBCTC

5829 Allentown Rd
Camp Springs, MD, 20746 US
Vance Ayres, Secretary-Treasurer
directions Directions

WTU 6

490 Lenfant Plz SW Ste 7200
Washington, DC, 20024 US
George Parker, President
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L International Unions & Federations

AFA (Association of Flight Attendants)

501 3rd St NE
Washington, DC, US
202-434-1300
www.afanet.org
directions Directions

AFGE: American Federation of Government Employees

80 F St NW
Washington, DC, US
202-737-8700
www.afge.org
directions Directions

AFL-CIO

815 16th St NW
Washington, DC, United States
directions Directions

AFSCME: American Federation of State, County & Municipal Employees

1625 L St NW
Washington, DC, US
202-429-1000
www.afscme.org
directions Directions

AFT (American Federation of Teachers)

555 New Jersey Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
202-879-4400
www.aft.org
directions Directions

Airline Pilots Association

1625 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
703-689-2270
www.alpa.org
directions Directions

Amalgmated Transit Union

5025 Wisconsin Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
directions Directions

American Federation of School Administrators

1101 17th St NW
Washington, DC, US
202-986-4209
www.admin.org
directions Directions

APWU (American Postal Workers Union)

1300 L St NW
Washington, DC, US
202-842-4200
www.apwu.org
directions Directions

Asbestos Workers (Int'l Association of Heat & Frost Insulators & Allied Workers)

Martin Luther King Jr Hwy
Lanham, MD, 20706 US
301-731-9101
www.insulators.org
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Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers & Grain Millers International Union

10401 Connecticut Ave
Kensington, MD, 20895 US
301-933-8600
www.bctgm.org
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Bricklayers (Int'l Union of Bricklayers & Allied Craftworkers)

620 F St NW
Washington, DC, United States
202-783-3788
www.bacweb.org
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Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen

917 Shenandoah Shores Rd
Front Royal, VA, 22630 US
540-622-6522
www.brs.org
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Carpenters

101 Constitution Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
directions Directions

Change to Win

1900 L St NW
Suite 900
Washington, DC, US
202-721-0660
www.changetowin.org
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CWA (Communications Workers of America)

501 3rd St NW
Washington, DC, US
202-434-1100
www.cwa-union.org
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Federation of Professional Athletes

1133 20th St NW
Washington, DC, 20036 US
202-756-9100
www.nflpa.org
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IAFF (International Association of Firefighters)

1750 New York Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20006 US
202-737-8484
www.iaff.org
directions Directions

IAM (International Association of Machinists & Aerospace Workers)

9000 Machinists Pl
Upper Marlboro, MD, 20772-2675 US
301-967-4500
www.iamaw.org
directions Directions

IBEW (International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers)

900 7th St NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
202-833-7000
www.ibew.org
directions Directions

IFPTE (International Federation of Professional & Technical Engineers)

501 3rd St NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
202-239-4880
www.ifpte.org
directions Directions

Iron Workers

1750 New York Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20006 US
202-383-4800
www.ironworkers.org
directions Directions

IUEC (Int'l Union of Elevator Constructors)

7154 Columbia Gateway Dr
Columbia, MD, US
410-953-6150
www.iuec.org
directions Directions

IUOE (Int'l Union of Operating Engineers)

1125 17th St Nw
Washington, DC, 20036-4701 US
202-429-9100
www.iuoe.org
directions Directions

Laborers

905 16th St NW
Washington, DC, US
202-737-8320
www.liuna.org
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MEBA (Marine Engineers' Beneficial Association)

444 North Capitol St NW
Suite 800
Washington, DC, 20001 US
202-638-5355
www.d1meba.org
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NALC (Nat'l Association of Letter Carriers)

100 Indiana Ave Nw
Washington, DC, 20001-2143 US
202-393-4695
www.nalc.org
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NATCA (Nat'l Air Traffic Controller's Association)

1325 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20005 US
202-628-5451
www.natca.org
directions Directions

National Education Association (NEA)

1201 16th St NW
Washington, DC, United States
directions Directions

OP&CMIA (Operative Plasters' & Cement Masons' Int'l Assoc. of the U.S. and Canada)

11720 Beltsville Dr
Beltsville, MD, US
301-623-1000
www.opcmia.org
directions Directions

Painters

7234 Parkway Drive
Hanover, MD, 21076 US
directions Directions

Plate Printers (International Plate Printers, Die Stampers & Engravers Union of North America)

906 Dennis Ave
Silver Spring, MD, 20901 US
301-681-7052
directions Directions

Plumbers

3 Park Place
Annapolis, MD, 21401 US
directions Directions

Postal Workers (Nat'l Postal Mail Handlers Union)

1001 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
202-833-9095
www.npmhu.org
directions Directions

Roofers

1660 L St NW
Suite 800
Washington, DC, United States
202-463-7663
www.unionroofers.com
directions Directions

SEIU (Service Employees Int'l Union)

1800 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
202-730-7000
www.seiu.org
directions Directions

SIU (Seafarer's Int'l Union of N.A.)

5201 Auth Way, MD 20746
MD, US
301-899-0675
www.seafarers.org
directions Directions

SMWIA (Sheet Metal Workers Int'l Assoc)

1750 New York Ave Nw
Washington, DC, 20006-5305 US
202-783-5880
www.smwia.org
directions Directions

TCU/IAM

3 Research Pl
Rockville, MD, US
301-948-4910
www.tcunion.org
directions Directions

Teamsters (Int'l Brotherhood of Teamsters)

25 Louisiana Ave NW
Washington, DC, United States
202.624.6800
www.teamster.org/
directions Directions

Transport Workers Union

501 3rd St NW # 9
Washington, DC 20001
202) 719-3900
www.twu.org/
directions Directions

UAN

8515 Georgia Ave
Silver Spring, MD, US
301-543-8320
www.uannurse.org
directions Directions

UFCW

1775 K St NW
Washington, DC, US
directions Directions

UMWA

8515 Lee Hwy
Fairfax, VA, US
703-208-7200
www.umwa.org
directions Directions

UNITE HERE

1775 K St NW
Suite 620
Washington, DC, US
202-393-4373
www.unitehere.org
directions Directions

Utility Workers

888 16th St NW
Washington, DC, US
202-974-8200
www.uwua.org
directions Directions

L Labor Art

"American Professional Workers & American Laborers" bas-relief

441 G St NW
GAO Building
Washington, DC, 20001 US
Flanking the doors of the main entrance of the GAO Building, 441 G Street, NW is a bas relief/frieze of American Professional Workers and American Laborers. Created by…,along with the building (?), in 1951, the images honor the service of workers in such fields as science, economics, farming and construction. They express the idea of transforming raw materials into goods for the advancement of humanity.
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"Health and Welfare" frieze (1941)

300 Indiana Ave Nw
Washington, DC, 20001-2108 US
"Health and Welfare," a ceramic frieze by artist Hildreth Meiere, was created in 1941 on the west wall of the east open-air courtyard at 300 Indiana Avenue (Municipal Center). It depicts a wide range of activities performed by social and public health workers.
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"The Meaning of Social Security" Mural

330 Independence Ave Sw
first floor, Wilbur J. Cohen Bldg
Washington, DC, 20024 US
Ben Shahn's mural, painted in 1940, shows the hardships of life before the establishment of Social Security, and its benefits--work, the family, and prosperity. Workers in various occupations are shown re-building America through public works projects. The murals are open to the public by appointment only. Call 202-619-3919 or email pubaff@voa.gov
- LHF
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Coal Miner's Stained Glass Window, Foundry United Methodist Church

1500 16th St NW
Washington, DC, 20036 US
Foundry United Methodist Church has, in its vestry, a stained glass window presented in memory of John T. Jones by his colleagues of the United Mine Workers of America. The window depicts the Founder of Methodism, John Wesley, proclaiming his burning message to those who toiled in the coal pits. Coming up from the mines of his native Wales, Mr. Jones became a trusted leader in the ranks of organized labor in his adopted country, which he loved and served with ardent devotion. John T. Jones was an
honored official of Foundry Church, a joyful partner in its work and worship, giving generously of his time, talents, and substance to the welfare and to the cause of the Christian church in all the earth as he
practiced the creed of John Wesley--"The world is my parish."

Visitors are welcome to view the window during normal office hours when services are not being held. For hours see
http://www.foundryumc.org/contact/index.html
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DC Labor FilmFest

8633 Colesville Rd
AFI Silver Theatre
Silver Spring, MD, United States
Screening films about work and workers since 2001. The 2009 FilmFest is scheduled for October 12-18 in Washington, DC at the American Film Institute's Silver Theatre and Cultural Center and other area venues. Click on www.dclabor.org for latest details
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Depictions of Labor & Trade (1930s)

Interstate Commerce Commission
This site includes two statues flanking the Federal Trade Commission building, as well as four bas reliefs: two on the Pennsylvania Avenue side and two on the Constitution Avenue side.
"Man Controlling Trade" statues: these works by Michael Lantz speak to the power workers have when united in a common goal. Not only are workers responsible for creating the goods to enable trade and spur economic growth, but they also have the power to bring the economy to a stand-still by withholding their labor. The two statues, although similar, are not identical. In "the Pennsylvania Avenue version, the horse has a sinister look. It appears to be biting the man, and the man’s weak positioning suggests that he will fail to bridle the menace. In the other, on Constitution Avenue, the man appears sinister, and he has a more powerful hold upon a more elegant and sympathetic animal. Perhaps Lantz’s statuary captures our ambivalence about the regulation of trade."
"Americans at Work, Past & Present" is comprised of 4 bas reliefs over the doorways of the FTC: four artists collaborated to create the elements of Americans at Work, Past and Present: "Industry," by Chaim Gross, "Shipping," by Robert Laurent, "Agriculture," by Concetta Scarabaglione and "Foreign Trade" by Carl Schmitz. As part of the WPA, these bas-relief were created in 1937.
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Harold Weston Federal Construction Murals (1938)

7th St SW & D Streets
Ground floor, east vestibule
Washington, DC, 20024 US
Perhaps one of the best-kept labor and art secrets in DC (and there seem to be many) are the murals of Harold Weston. Depicting the construction of government buildings and office activities, these murals are excellent examples of New Deal art projects of the 1930s; they were designed to represent the recovery being made from the Great Depression. Harold Weston, a painter, etcher, muralist, author and national leader in art and public service, won the competition (which was part of the Treasury Relief Art Project, a program of the WPA). He did extensive drawings before beginning his murals, paintings on canvas that cover 840 feet of wall space. "It seemed to me," said Weston, " that my mural, in which any emotional approach would be out of place, would only become more than a suitable decoration if I got to know the essential processes of construction, character of things, gestures of workers and then let emphasis, exaggeration or scale be dictated by what was needed to build up the design. I felt I had to know the fundamentals of what I was trying to paint.” Weston created the mural panels in his studio in the Adirondacks and supervised the installation. He added details where necessary, based on the actual site and lighting of the space. The murals were unveiled in a ceremony on July 1, 1938.
(Jon Garlock from handout at building)
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John Joseph Earley

734 15th St Nw
Washington, DC, 20005-1001 US
Earley's work in concrete (note the colorful work over the doorways on the Walker Building here) shows up all over Washington. A stonecutter's son, his "genius enriched the city from the 1910s into the 1940s," according to Benjamin Forgey (WashPost 3/31/2001). Earley "ran a union shop organized along ancient apprenticeship lines; his workers were carefully trained in a system that placed a high value on near-perfect finishes."
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Justice Department murals

Constitution between 9th & 10th Sts NW
Washington, DC, 20003 US
The Department of Justice building houses a unique collection of murals by George Biddle, Henry Varnum Poor, Leon Kroll and others. These artists created images of daily life in America, and were particularly interested in portraying triumphs and tragedies of workers, families and issues facing the country. One particularly powerful mural depicts women, children and men crammed into a small textile factory; the title of this mural is "Sweatshop." The Biddle murals are located on the Constitution Avenue side of the building.(check to see if still there, find out interesting stories)
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National Union Building

918 F Street NW
Washington, DC,
The National Union Building is an historic building that actually has nothing to do with unions. The fire proof steel frame brownstone was built for the National Union Fire Insurance Company. Located in the Penn Quarter neighborhood, it was designed by Glenn Brown in 1890 and is an example of Romanesque architecture and is currently owned by DC-based LivingSocial.
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Post Office Murals (1930s)

1200 Pennsylvania Ave NW
lobby to left of postal station
Washington, DC, US
Reginald Marsh, among others, created murals for the Post Office building, depicting such themes as the internal operations of the Post Office, the Postal Service in isolated areas, postal workers unloading, sorting and transferring mail and the connections the Postal Service facilitates between people around the world. According to xxx, these murals, plus the murals in the Department of Justice building represented significant works of government art, both in quality and quantity; "..... led to the formation of a permanent section of painting and sculpture in the Treasury Department for the decoration of new Federal buildings."
(NOTE: the only murals you can see are on the ground floor on Pennsylvania Avenue in the lobby to the left of the postal station; to see the ones on upper floors -- including the two by Marsh (corridor in the southwest corner of the 4th floor), one of the unloading of mail from an ocean steamer and one of the internal workings of "the great Post Office" -- you must have someone from the EPA get you into the building)
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SEIU Bas-Relief

1313 L St NW
Washington, DC, US
Inscribed, "In Unity, Strength," the relief depicts labor's progress, from the days of early factory workers to today's SEIU membership. SEIU headquarters are now located at (address)
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United Unions Building

1750 New York Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20006 US
Houses several small sculptures in the downstairs lobby. A mural depicting (need detail) can be seen near the Painter's offices on the XX floor.
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Washington National Cathedral's Labor Windows

Massachusetts Ave NW & Wisconsin Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
Among the Washington National Cathedral’s 231 stained glass windows are three honoring men who spent their lives “pursuing the rights of workers”: Samuel Gompers, William Green and Philip Murray (cite other DC sites for each). The windows (see below for locations) are spectacular and tangible evidence of labor’s place in Washington, with work and workers portrayed both explicitly and allegorically, as well as union emblems from both the AFL and the CIO (which had not yet merged). Take binoculars or a camera with a good zoom lens (photos are permitted) to get the best view of the windows’ many details. (Chris Garlock)

The descriptions below are from “Jewels of Light,” by Elody R. Crimi and Diane Ney, with photographs by Ken Cobb, and available in the Cathedral Gift Shop.

“Agriculture and Maritime” (1959; in the Nave, North Main Arcade, Bay 6, White Bay; artist & fabricator Joseph G. Reynolds, Jr.) “recognizes those members of the agriculture and maritime ‘guilds’ who ply their trades in the soil and on the sea, providing the basic nourishments of life. William Green…spent his early life in the coal mines and his later life organizing the American Federation of Labor…his life’s work was to create a society in which every human being was recognized for the value of his or her work…the theme of this window is the sacramental nature of work through the production of food, basic to life.”

“Industrial and Social Reform” (1959, Nave, North Main Arcade, Bay 7, Boardman Bay; artist & fabricator: Napolean Setti): “Philip Murray…championed the well-being of families as a means of promoting the well-being of nations. Both result from a fair wage for a fair day’s labor, and this is played out in the window’s theme, which is the necessity for justice for laborers, as illustrated through a series of biblical and modern scenarios.”

“Artisans and Craftsmen” (1959, Nave, South Main Arcade, Bay 6, Wilson Bay; artist & fabricator: Joseph G. Reynolds, Jr): “Dedicated to labor leader Samuel Gompers…the last of the three labor windows to be completed, it includes many symbols and emblems in tribute to worthy artists, artisans and craftsmen.”

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L Monuments & Markers

A. Philip Randolph Memorial

Union Station
Columbus Cir at Mass Ave and First St
Washington, DC, United States
Honors the labor leader and civil rights leader A. Philip Randolph, leader of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters.
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Amtrak Workers Memorial

50 Massachusetts Ave NE
Union Station
Washington, DC, US
Memorial honors those Amtrak employees who "lost their lives in performance of their duties."
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Arsenal Monument

1801 E St SE
Congressional Cemetery: Range 97, Site 142
Washington, DC, US
An accidental explosion at the Washington Arsenal on June 17, 1864, killed at least 21 women who worked filling cartridges for the Union Army during the Civil War. President Abraham Lincoln led the cortege to the cemetery, followed by a band, 90 pall bearers and 2,000 mourners. The monument was paid for with contributions from the public.
- LHF
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Arsenal Monument

785 17th St SE
D.C., DC, 20003 US
Twenty workers are killed and many others seriously injured in an explosion at the U.S. Arsenal in Washington, D.C. The workers were girls and young women, mostly Irish immigrants, making ammunition for the Union Army. The funeral procession, which included President Abraham Lincoln, stretched for more than a mile. A monument was erected in the Congressional Cemetery, where 17 of the workers were buried.
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Emancipation Memorial

Lincoln Park; East end
Near E Capitol & 13th
DC, US
The Emancipation Memorial, also known as the Freedman’s Memorial or the Emancipation Group, and sometimes referred to as the "Lincoln Memorial" before the present more prominent so-named memorial was built, is a monument in Lincoln Park in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Washington, D.C.[1][2]

Designed and sculpted by Thomas Ball and erected in 1876, the monument depicts Abraham Lincoln in his role of the "Great Emancipator" freeing a male African American slave modeled on Archer Alexander. The ex-slave is depicted crouching shirtless and shackled at the president's feet.[1]

The monument has long been the subject of controversy. According to information from American University:

If there is one slavery monument whose origins are highly political, the Freedman’s memorial is it. The development process for this memorial started immediately after Abraham Lincoln’s assassination and ended, appropriately enough, near the end of Reconstruction in 1876. In many ways, it exemplified and reflected the hopes, dreams, striving, and ultimate failures of reconstruction.[1]

Despite being paid for by African Americans, because of the supplicant and inferior position of the Black figure, historian Kirk Savage in 1997 condemned it as "a monument entrenched in and perpetuating racist ideology".
- Wikipedia

"One of the inscribed tablets upon the pedestal informs us that the first contribution was the first free earnings of Charlotte Scott, a freed woman of Virginia, at whose suggestion, on the day of Lincoln's death, this monument fund was begun. This statue...was unveiled on April 14, 1876, the eleventh anniversary of Lincoln's assassination, Frederick Douglass making the oration."
- Rand McNally's Handy Guide to Washington
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IBEW Museum

900 7th St NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
Cool museum focusing on the history of the electrical worker's union. Currently offers tours of the building and museum to IBEW members at 10am and 1:30pm, M-F. Sign up in the lobby or use website http://www.ibew.org/tours/index.htm to schedule a tour The IBEW is "working on creating a larger online museum presence and we are in talks to open the museum from 9-4pm, M-F to all visitors," says Museum Curator Curtis Bateman. "When these changes happen, they will be posted on the Tour section of the website." Reach Bateman at 202-728-7691 or by e-mail at Curtis_Bateman@IBEW.org
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Malcolm X Park (aka Meridian Hill Park)

According to Jessica Kadylak in the Washingtonian, “A leader of the Black United Front began referring to the park in honor of the civil-rights leader on the one-year anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., says Simone Moffett, cultural-resource specialist for Rock Creek Park…. DC resi-dents later voted for the name to be officially changed to Malcolm X. A bill to change the name was introduced to Congress in January 1970, says Moffett, but didn’t pass.”
The name and the controversy surrounding it represents a radical history in and of itself. Over the last couple of decades alone, there has been a tremen-dous number of protests that have taken place here and many marches have started here. From anti-war, anti-corporate globalization, women’s and civil rights protests to rallies against the drug war, for amnesty for political prisoners and for immigration reform. Many May Day rallies in recent years have been focused on the latter. This park has played host to hundreds of protests. We are contributing to a rich radical history surrounding this park as we speak.
- Fhar Miess
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Mother Jones marker

2501 Powder Mill Rd
in front of the Hillandale Baptist Church, near the intersection with Riggs Rd
Silver Spring, MD, 20903 US
Irish-born Mother Jones was one of the most well-known women of the 20th century. She was called "the Joan of Arc of the Labor Movement," "the Miners' Angel," "the Most Dangerous Woman in America" and, in her later years, the "Grand Old Champion of Labor." Throughout her long life she spread the gospel of unionism, organizing workers throughout the country, often sleeping in union halls or on the floor of a coal miner's home. She once told a congressional committee, "my address is like my shoes, it travels with me. I abide where there is fight against slavery. In her later years, from 1928-1930, she stayed at the home of Walter and Lillian Burgess who lived on a small truck farm at the site of what is now the Hillandale Baptist Church in Adelphi, Maryland. The Burgesses loved Mother Jones. Lillian befriended her and became her caregiver during the last years of her life."
(Saul Schniderman; see whole posting at http://www.cwluherstory.org/mother-jones-in-2008.html)
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National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial

5th Street Northwest
E St., between 4th & 5th Sts. NW
Washington, DC, United States
The Memorial honors all of America's federal, state and local law enforcement officers who have been killed in the line of duty, dating back to the first known death in 1794.
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Robert A. Taft Memorial and Carillon

Honors Senator Robert Taft, the namesake, with Representative Fred A. Hartley, Jr. of the Taft-Hartley Act, a United States federal law that monitors the activities and power of labor unions. Taft-Hartley became law by overcoming U.S. President Harry S. Truman's veto on June 23, 1947; labor leaders called it the "slave-labor bill" while President Truman argued that it was a "dangerous intrusion on free speech", and that it would "conflict with important principles of our democratic society".
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Titanic Memorial

Workers on the Titanic
Of the 1514 people lost at sea in the sinking of the Titanic, 696 were members of the crew. The worst hit members of the crew were subcontractors who worked in the restaurant: of 69 people, only 3 survived. Several Titanic sur-vivors indicated that the restaurant employees were locked up in their quarters by the stewards to prevent them from rushing the lifeboats. It has never been confirmed whether this was true or not.
- Fhar Miess
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L Labor Organizations - historic

"Trade Unionist" publication (1896)

429 7th St NW
Washington, DC, 20004 US
"Official organ of 95% of the organized labor of Washington" (Illus Hist 1900) 5th St NW (1956); paper first issued 1896 from 429 7th st nw; in the 1900 illus hist; of the wash ctrl labor union, an ad on p380 lists it at 441-443 G st NW; by 7/1912 it had moved to 606 5th st nw; it moved to 720 5th in 1924.

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AFL HQ (1897)

700 14th St NW
Washington, DC, US
Founded in 1881 as the Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions of the United States and Canada. Organized along craft lines, it sought to build strong and well-knit national unions financially able to carry on strikes, if necessary, to secure increased wages, shorter hours, and improved working conditions (Labor's Untold Story, p 90). Became the American Federation of Labor in 1886 and founder Samuel Gompers moved the fledgling organization from New York City to a 3-room office on this site in 1897. The preamble to the Constitution adopted in 1896 read: "A struggle is going on in the nations of the world between the oppressors and oppressed of all countries, a struggle between capital and labor which must grow in intensity from year to year and work disastrous results to the toiling millions of all nations if not combined for mutual protection and benefit." In 1915 the AFL built a 7-story headquarters of brick and limestone on the NW corner of 9th & Massachusetts.
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AFL HQ (1916)

901 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
Served as headquarters for the American Federation of Labor (AFL) from 1916 to 1956. The cornerstone inscription, written by Samuel Gompers, said: "American Federation of Labor, Founded 1881. This edifice erected for service: in the cause of Labor-Justice-Freedom-Humanity, 1915-1916." In 1957, the United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbers and Pipefitters Industry moved into the building. National Historic Landmark.
- Inventory of American Labor Landmarks #5, Labor Heritage Foundation

Dedicated by President Wilson on July 4, 1916; included a Samuel Gompers Memorial Room, which contained personal mementos, portraits etc., of the 'grand old man of labor'.
- Federal Writer's Project
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Building Trades Council (1894)

430 9th St NW
Washington, DC, US
formed 9/18/1894
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Building Trades Council (1935)

1211 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
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Central Labor Union (1880-1896)

4 1/2 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
For several years, the CLU -- the forerunner of the modern Metropolitan Washington Council AFL-CIO -- co-existed with another city-wide labor organization, District Assembly 66 of the Knights of Labor (see 16); in fact, both organizations met at the same location, 4 ½ & Pennsylvania, the CLU on Tuesday nights, DA 66 on Thursdays. Eventually, DA 66 was dissolved but this would not be the last time there would be parallel citywide labor organizations:
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Central Labor Union (1896)

423 G St NW
Typographical Temple
Washington, DC, US
The current Metropolitan Washington Council, AFL-CIO, traces its roots to a March 23, 1897 meeting of delegates from ten unions: granite-cutters, carpenters, electrical workers, bricklayers, bakers, stereotypers, musicians, cigar-makers, typographical workers, and plumbers. Milford Spohn, of the Bricklayers' Union, was elected the 1st President. Just three years later, the Central Labor Union boasted 42 unions representing 12,000 members. The CLU was originally chartered as the Washington Branch of the AF of L.
- MWC centennial history book (KM)
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Central Labor Union (1918)

605 5th St NW
Washington, DC, US
Forerunner of the Metro Washington Council, AFL-CIO
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Central Labor Union (1935)

750 5th St NW
Washington, DC, US
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Central Labor Union (1946?)

525 New Jersey Ave NW
Washington, DC, US
Forerunner of the Metro Washington Council, AFL-CIO
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Central Labor Union (Metropolitan Washington Council) (19??-2003?)

1401 K St NW
Washington, DC, US
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Central Labor Union (Metropolitan Washington Council) 2003?-2007

1925 K St NW
Washington, DC, US
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CIO HQ (1938-39)

1001 15th St NW
Washington, DC, US
Site of what became the Congress of Industrial Organizations (which merged with the AFL in 1957), but was then known as the Committee on Industrial Organizing. [needs explanation of why CIO was formed]
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CIO HQ (1953)

718 Jackson Pl NW
Washington, DC, US
Fourth and final headquarters for the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO). As of 2008, the building is owned by the federal government and houses small units attached to the Executive Office of the President.[
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Colored National Labor Union (1869)

481 9th St NW
Washington, DC, US
(W side of 9th between E & F; now a freeway; closest site is L'Enfant Plaza) At this site -- Union League Hall -- in December, 1869, a national convention of black workers met in Union League Hall and founded the CNLU. Over several days, the 159 delegates elected Baltimore caulker Isaac Myers president, adopted a broad platform covering relations between labor and capital, education, and other issues, and developed plans to build the organization. The need for a separate organization of black workers was underscored by their exclusion from existing trade unions, including that of Lewis H. Douglass (son of Frederick Douglass) from the Printers Union. The following year the CNLU made the weekly "New National Era" its national publication and named Frederick Douglass (see 43, 48) as editor. (CNLU duration and impact?)
- Breier Volume 1, pages 541 & Dubois (J Garlock)
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Department of Labor: Labor Hall of Fame, History of Labor Murals

200 Constitution Ave NW
Frances Perkins Building
Washington, DC, US
The Department of Labor is in the Frances Perkins Building (need bio of Perkins here).
The Labor Hall of Fame (C Street entrance; open during government working hours and a picture ID is necessary to enter the building) honors those Americans whose distinctive contributions to the field of labor have enhanced the quality of life of millions. Included are leaders: Samuel Gompers, John L. Lewis, A. Philip Randolph, Eugene V. Debs, and Mother Jones.

"The History of Labor in America" Murals: The murals feature the evolution of labor in America. Each mural represents a specific period and they are respectively titled: Colonization, Settlement, Industry, and Technology.

Sturdivant, John (bust; need location): John Sturdivant was the president of the American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE) from 1988 until his death in 1997. He is credited with revitalizing AFGE as a key players in federal personnel issues.
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Federated Press (1956)

720 5th St NW
Washington, DC, US
A wire and mail service of America's labor press, which existed for 30 years, probably from the 1920s(?) to 19??. The Federated Press had bureaus in Washington, New York City and Chicago, and stringers throughout the United States and around the world. FP gathered news and information about working people and disseminated it to daily and weekly labor and radical newspapers during the 1930s. The DC bureau located at this site was headed by Len DeCaux, a radical labor journalist and educator. (Jon Garlock)
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First DC HQ of Laborers

Originally built in the 1920's, The Bowen Building was the first DC headquarters of the Laborers, from 1940-1959, before they moved to their current building at 905 16th St NW. The building was redeveloped into a modern, first-class office building in 2004, preserving only the existing facade, which was deemed historic by the DC Historic Preservation Review Board.
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Gov't Worker's Housing/Women's Dorm (1918-1920s)

"Over 30 temporary buildings were erected on this site in front of Union Station to house government workers during the World War 1 era. One group of these buildings, the Union Plaza Dormitories, was built between 1918-1920, specifically for 2,000 female government workers. The dorms featured maid service and a spacious dining room serving two meals a day. These 'Government Hotels' were razed starting in 1931, to clear the area for today's Union Station Plaza."
- "On This Spot, Washington, DC," p 34 (see photo) by Douglas E. Evelyn & Paul Dickson
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Isaac Cohen's Brotherhood of Labor (1878)

3501 New York Ave NE
National Arboretum (just inside the New York Avenue entrance)
Washington, DC, United States
Exploited black laborers at the Federal Brickyards organized into a group referred to as Isaac Cohen's Brotherhood of Labor in 1878 and successfully agitated for higher wages (Peter Winch).
NOTE: this may not be the correct site; this is the site of a "historic brickyard" at the site of what is now the U.S. National Arboretum, which says that "The brickyard was started in 1909-1910, becoming one of more than 100 large and small brick makers then located in the Washington, D.C. area." Further research needs to be conducted to determine the exact location of the Federal Brickyards, where Cohen organized the workers.
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John L. Lewis House (1937-1969)

614 Oronoco St
(Lee-Fendall House)
Alexandria, VA, US
United Mine Workers President John L. Lewis lived here with his wife Myrta and daughter Katherine. It was the site for many key meetings and historic decisions in the development of the American labor movement, such as the strike to win gains like health care and safety protection for UMWA members, the decision to organize Big Steel into the United Steel Workers of America, and the establishment of the Congress of Industrial Organizations. (Peter Winch)
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Knights of Labor HQ (1895)

4 1/2 & Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20003 US
Founded in 1869, the Knights of Labor was America's first national labor organization. 12,000 locals included workers in all trades/occupations, both skilled and unskilled, women and men, and blacks as well as whites. Its national office moved from Philadelphia to Washington in 1895, to this site already used by KOL District Assembly 66, which represented (?#) of Local Assemblies in Washington from 18?? to 18??. In 1891, DA 66 represented bakers, carpenters and joiners, clerks, machinists, molders, musicians, painters, paperhangers, plasterers, plate printers, tailors, tinners, book binders, butchers, coachmakers and plumbers. (Jon Garlock)
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National Women's Trade Union League of America

815 Mt Vernon Pl NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
The Women's Trade Union League (WTUL) was a U.S. organization of both working class and more well-off women formed in 1903 to support the efforts of women to organize labor unions and to eliminate sweatshop conditions. The WTUL played an important role in supporting the massive strikes in the first two decades of the twentieth century that established the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union and Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America and in campaigning for women's suffrage among men and women workers.
- Wikipedia
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United Mine Workers of America HQ (1937-99); CIO HQ

900 15th St NW
Washington, DC, US
Under the leadership of John L. Lewis, the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) moved their headquarters to Washington, D.C., in 1937. The union sold the building in 1999. The CIO's second headquarters was an office on the third floor (dates needed)
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WPA headquarters

1734 New York Ave NE
Washington, DC, 20002 US
The Walker-Johnson Building, headquarters of the WPA, at 1734 New York Avenue, Washington, DC. This is where Harry Hopkins and his fellow WPA administrators created one of America's greatest public policies - a work-relief program for 8.5 million unemployed Americans, working on hundreds of thousands of public works projects, many of which we still utilize and enjoy today. This photo was taken in March 1938. According to Emporis.com, the building has been demolished. Like the WPA, and like the hopes & dreams of millions of unemployed Americans over the subsequent decades, it disappeared. Photo courtesy of the National Archives.
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L Labor Leaders - historic

Andrew Furuseth Memorial Bust

8th & F Sts NW
Washington, DC, United States
Union leader, Andrew Furuseth, was one of the founders of the SUP and the president of the International Seamen's Union of America. He was known as the "Abe Lincoln of the Seas." He was an immigrant from Romedal, Norway and has a monument there as well. There are at least seven castings of this bust; locations unknown.

see: Furuseth, Andrew, Memorial
see book: "Calf's Head and Union Tale" by Archie Green, 1996
- LHF
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Chavez/Douglass/Gompers/MLK/Tubman/Keller plaques

655 15th St NW
D.C., DC, 20005 US
The Extra Mile – Points of Light Volunteer Pathway is honors individuals who championed causes to help others realize a better America.

The Extra Mile medallions, set into the sidewalk, begins at the corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and 15th Street, NW and continues north on 15th Street to G Street, NW. There, at the Old Ebbitt Grill, it turns east on G Street for two blocks to its intersection with 13th Street.


Cesar Chavez
Led by his desire to secure a better quality of life for migrant farm workers, Cesar Chavez helped found the United Farm Workers for America (UFW), the first effective farm workers’ union in the United States. Under his leadership of nonviolent protest, the UFW was able to secure improved wages and benefits, more humane living and working conditions and better job security for some of the poorest workers in America. Through his life of service, Chavez provided inspiration to countless others.

Frederick Douglass
Famed orator and writer Frederick Douglass was also a key architect of the movement that ended slavery, the very institution into which he was born. Even after his goal to abolish slavery was achieved, Douglass persisted in his struggle for equality. His work in the women’s rights and civil rights movements helped set the stage for further landmark change in this country.

Samuel Gompers
As founder and 37-year president of the American Federation of Labor (AFL), Samuel Gompers is credited with winning unprecedented rights and protections for the American worker. Never wavering in his belief that power for the worker lay in collective action and honest negotiation, Gompers experienced unequaled success in organizing millions of laborers into a single national organization. Read more on Samuel Gompers.

Martin Luther King, Jr.
In founding the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave momentum to the civil rights movement. Dr. King’s persistent efforts, inspiring oratory and non-violent protests, despite physical attacks, death threats and retaliatory violence, brought America closer to his dream of equality for all. Read more on Martin Luther King, Jr.

Harriet Tubman
Harriet Tubman escaped a life of slavery only to return south, at her own peril, time and again, to lead more than 300 fugitive slaves through the Underground Railroad to safety and freedom. After the Civil War, Tubman raised money to clothe and educate newly freed African-American children and established a home for and indigent African-Americans.

Helen Keller Memorial Plaque
Like the statue of her found in the US Capitol (see picture) the “Helen Keller story” that is stamped in our collective consciousness freezes her in childhood. We remember her most vividly at age seven when her teacher, Annie Sullivan, connected her to language through a magical moment at the water pump. We learned little of her life beyond her teen years, except that she worked on behalf of the handicapped, as mentioned in this commemorative plaque.
But there is much more to Helen Keller’s history than a brilliant deaf and blind woman who surmounted incredible obstacles. Helen Keller worked throughout her long life to achieve social change; she was an integral part of many important social movements in the 20th century. She was a socialist and a radical who believed she was able to overcome many of the difficulties in her life because of her class privilege—a privilege not shared by most of her blind or deaf contemporaries. “I owed my success partly to the advantages of my birth and environment,” she said. “I have learned that the power to rise is not within the reach of everyone.”
Consider her in her own words, during a 1916 interview in the New York Tribune:
I was religious to start with. I had thought blindness a misfortune.
Then I was appointed on a commission to investigate the conditions of the blind. For the first time I, who had thought blindness a misfortune beyond human control, found that too much of it was traceable to wrong industrial conditions, often caused by the selfishness and greed of employers. And the social evil contributed its share. I found that pov-erty drove women to a life of shame that ended in blindness.
Then I read HG Wells’ Old Worlds for New, summaries of Karl Marx’s philosophy and his manifestoes. It seemed as if I had been asleep and waked to a new world—a world different from the world I had lived in.
For a time I was depressed, but little by little my confidence came back and I realized that the wonder is not that conditions are so bad, but that society has advanced so far in spite of them. And now I am in the fight to change things. I may be a dreamer, but dreamers are necessary to make facts!
She was even a long-time member of the much maligned (and still active) Industrial Workers of the World. In the same interview, she stated: “The true task is to unite and organize all workers on an economic basis, and it is the workers themselves who must secure freedom for themselves, who must grow strong.” Miss Keller continued. “Nothing can be gained by political action. That is why I became an IWW.”
- Fhar Miess
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Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

1411 W St Se
Washington, DC, 20020-4813 US
In 1877 Douglass purchased a home in Uniontown (now Anacostia), which is now a National Historical Site. He remained there until his death, serving as Recorder of Deeds for the District of Columbia from 1881 to 18??. Devoted increasingly to his family and to lecturing, Douglass lived out his life as "The Sage of Anacostia." At his death a public service was held at the Metropolitan A.M.E. Church in downtown Washington; public schools were closed and a Letter Carrier honor guard attended Douglass at the service.

In 1870, Douglass had moved from Rochester, New York (last stop on the Underground Railroad) to Washington to become editor of The National Era, the official weekly journal of the National Colored Labor Union. In 1871 he was appointed to the Legislative Council of the District of Columbia. He continued to edit the National Era (renamed The New National Era) until 1877, when he was appointed U.S. Marshal of the District of Columbia. That same year he purchased a home in Uniontown (see 48). Douglass is perhaps best remembered in labor circles for his ringing declaration that "Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. Find out just what people will submit to and you will have found out the exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them; and these will continue til they have resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they suppress."

“Cheap Labor”
Cheap Labor, is a phrase that has no cheering music for the masses. Those who demand it, and seek to acquire it, have but little sympathy with common humanity. It is the cry of the few against the many. When we inquire who are the men that are continually vociferating for cheap labor, we find not the poor, the simple, and the lowly; not the class who dig and toil for their daily bread; not the landless, feeble, and defense-less portion of society, but the rich and powerful, the crafty and schem-ing, those who live by the sweat of other men’s faces, and who have no intention of cheapening labor by adding themselves to the laboring forces of society. It is the deceitful cry of the fortunate against the un-fortunate, of the idle against the industrious, of the taper-fingered dan-dy against the hard-handed working man. Labor is a noble word, and expresses a noble idea. Cheap labor, too, seems harmless enough, sounds well to hear, and looks well upon paper.
—Frederick Douglass
Isaac Myers
One of the official titles Frederick Douglass held during his long career was President of the Colored National Labor Union. Preceding him in that position was Isaac Myers, a pioneering early black labor leader who, like Frederick Douglass, also gained his first experience as an industrial worker as a caulker. In the late 1850s, the caulkers were being paid $1.75 per day—which was more than many white workers earned in similar trades. The high pay did not go un-noticed by shipyard owners and the influx of immigrant workers seeking jobs on the waterfront. In 1858, the historian Thomas wrote, “riots were instigated against black workers.”
Partly in response to similar events, In 1853, in a letter to Harriet Beecher Stowe, Douglass wrote “Prejudice against the free colored people in the United States has shown itself nowhere so invincible as among mechanics [a term at the time for skilled tradesmen].”
In response, some shipyard owners refused to hire black caulkers, and the situation was tense for several years. At the end of the Civil War, in 1865, white workers staged a successful strike that forced shipyards to dismiss Afri-can-Americans. Approximately 1,000 dock workers lost their jobs.
In response to the white workers’ successful strike, Myers organized a group of black and white businessmen to create a new shipyard, the Chesapeake Ma-rine Railway and Dry Dock Company, a cooperative that employed 300 black workers, and some white tradesmen, at $3 a day.
In a similar move, activists with ONE DC are currently organizing a Black Workers Center to create and maintain racial and economic justice through popular education, policy campaigns, direct action and the creation of work-er-owned coops and other worker-owned alternatives.
(Fhar Miess)
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Henry Miller, IBEW Founder

2219 Lincoln Rd NE
Washington, DC, 20002 US
(NOTE: grave is on Linden Avenue, just south of the Masonic Circle, Site 178 in Section F, Lot B) Henry Miller was a local lineman working at the 1890 St. Louis Exposition, featuring "a glorious display of electrical wonders." But as he spoke informally to his fellow tradesman, they found industry wide problems and concluded that in addition to exceptionally high mortality rates, they could earn no more than fifteen-to-twenty cents an hour for 12-hour days. Wiremen fared no better. Seeking to act collectively, they turned to the American Federation of Labor and chartered themselves as the Electrical Wiremen and Linemen's Union, No. 5221 of the AFL. Miller was elected president. Recognizing immediately the organization had to be national to command any real bargaining power, he traveled the country spreading the word about the benefits of unionization. Everywhere he went, he organized the electrical workers he worked with into local unions. Among the locals chartered in those early years were in Chicago, Milwaukee, Indianapolis, New Orleans, Toledo, Pittsburgh, New York and other cities. On November 21, 1891, the first convention was called in St. Louis with 10 delegates representing 286 members. Meeting in a small room above Stolley's Dance Hall in a poor section of St. Louis, they drafted a constitution, laws and emblem -- a fist grasping lightning bolts. The National Brotherhood of Electrical Workers was born. Miller died on July 10, 1896, when an electric shock caused him to fall from a pole in Northeast Washington, DC. Click here http://www.ibew.org/articles/01daily/0107/010711.htm for a longer version of this bio on the IBEW website.
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Joe Hill's ashes

National Archives
7th & D Sts
Washington, DC, United States
Joe Hill provided the American labor movement with one of its most compelling slogans: "Don't Mourn. Organize!" Although he never visited Washington, labor songwriter and agitator Joe Hill turned up posthumously. After his execution by the state of Utah on a trumped-up murder conviction, Hill's body was sent to Chicago to be cremated (Hill had famously declared that he did not want to "be caught dead in Utah"). Packets of his ashes were then mailed to members of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW, or Wobblies) to be scattered in every state. One such packet, intercepted by postal officials under the Espionage Act, ended up at the National Archives. Thanks to the Potomac Labor History Association, the ashes were turned over to the IWW in 1988. However, the envelope remains in the National Archives. It bears a photo of labor's martyr and the caption "Joe Hill, murdered by the capitalist class, November 19, 1915. Industrial Workers of the World. We must never forget." (Jon Garlock, based on reports in the New York Times 11/17/88 and The New Yorker 12/.19/88)
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John L. Lewis Residence (mid-'30s?)

607 Oronoco St
Alexandria, VA, US
Lewis lived there 40 years, planned most of the CIO there (Peter Winch)
Now the Lee-Fendall House.
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Samuel Gompers Memorial

10th & Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC, 20001 US
At 10th and Massachusetts Avenue is the Samuel Gompers Memorial Park, at the center of which is a bronze sculpture honoring the founder of the American Federation of Labor (AFL). Designed and executed by Robert Aitken in 1933, the monument brings together representations of work and family. In the 1940s, thieves reportedly discovered that the base of the monument was hollow and used it as a hideout. After years of neglect, the sculpture was renovated in 19xx.

The inscriptions on the Memorial read:
"So long as we have held fast to voluntary principles and have been actuated and inspired by the spirit of service, we have sustained our forward progress and we have made our labor movement something to be respected and accorded a place in the councils of our Republic. Where we have blundered into trying to force a policy or decision, even though wise or right, we have impeded, if not interrupted the realization of our aims." (left side)

"Say to the organized workers of America that as I have kept the faith I expect that they will keep the faith. They must carry on. Say to them that a union man carrying a card is not a good citizen unless he upholds the institutions of our country and a poor citizen if he upholds the institutions of our country and forgets the obligations of his trade associations." (right side)
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Samuel Gompers Residence (1920)

3500 35th St NW
Washington, DC, US
Address info drawn from 1920 City Directory (p 677); as of 2008, there's no 3500 35th Street; the big house on the corner (which looks like it could be Gompers house) is now 3601 Ordway; across the street is 3500 Ordway, which is a modern structure and an unlikely candidate. Further research -- check a 1920's-era plat map -- needs to be done to determine if Gompers' house is still standing (and if so, the location).
- 11/22/2008, Chris & Jon Garlock
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Terence V. Powderly gravesite

Rock Creek Cemetery
Section I (Eye), Lot 277
Washington, DC, 20011 US
Gravesite of Knights of Labor Grand Master Workman Terence V. Powderly (see also Powderly, Terence V, Home). Powderly (1849-1924), led the Knights Of Labor from 1878 to 1892. A machinist and Greenback-Labor Party Mayor Of Scranton, PA, Powderly conducted the KOL's transition from a secretive coal miner's union in the 1870s to an inclusive national labor organization. Rivalry between the powerful KOL and the emerging American Federation of Labor (AFL) in the 1880s, disagreement over reform vs. bread-and-butter emphasis, and personal differences with both the other KOL officers and AFL leaders -- especially Samuel Gompers (see cite) -- characterized Powderly's tenure. After retiring as Grand Master Workman in 1892, Powderly was appointed Assistant Commissioner of Immigration (?) and moved to DC (see Terence V. Powderly Home). His voluminous papers are in Catholic University's archives. (Jon Garlock)
DIRECTIONS: You can get a map from the parish office (the main building on the left when you come in off Allison Street). The grave is in Section I; follow the main road to that section; when it curves to the left, a path goes off to the right, and Powderly's grave is about a hundred feet down on the left, just off the path. NOTE: this icon is actually right on the graveside
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Terence V. Powderly Home

503 Rock Creek Church Rd NW
Washington, DC, US
After relinquishing leadership of the Knights of Labor, Terence Powderly moved to Washington, D.C., in 1897 when he was appointed U.S. Commissioner General of Immigration. He built the home to host his many friends and Mother Jones was a frequent visitor.
- Labor Heritage Foundation District of Columbia Labor Landmarks http://www.laborheritage.org/IALL-DC.html
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DC Labor Map

Welcome to the DC Labor Map! Here you can find both current and historic labor sites in Washington, DC, including union hotels, restaurants, international and local union organizations, labor art and historic labor sites. You can use it for an online virtual tour of DC labor, or to plan your visit to our nation’s capital.
CLICK ON "LEGEND" at right to view categories; TO CHOOSE A SPECIFIC CATEGORY just click on it and only those sites will be shown.
We welcome your comments and suggestions: click on the “comments” tab at the bottom of the map. The DC Labor Map is a project of the Metropolitan Washington Council, AFL-CIO: primary research was done by Chris Garlock, Jon Garlock and Lisa Garlock; contributors include: Saul Schniderman, Peter Winch and Fhar Miess.

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